Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. By Michael Pollan. The chapters on the apple, tulip, and potato offer cautionary evidence on the danger of destroying diversity in the name of commerce. I give it this rating because of the incredible thoughtfulness and concept behind it. The review of this Book prepared by David Loftus Chapter Analysis of The Botany of Desire Click on a plot link to find similar books! It also sets the stage nicely for O.D. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World at Amazon.com. The science also contributes to areas like farming practices, pharmaceutical research, and ecology to name just a few. Gave it as a gift on a couple of occasions after I read it. This is the best piece of anything that I've ever read on gardening, even though its not entirely on gardening. This book was a beautiful book, though not the tome that O.D was, it's beautifully written. and it occurred to me. In Michael Pollan’s The Botany of Desire, we get four stories: the histories of apples, tulips, marijuana, and potatoes. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published He is an amazing, amazing writer: he makes me want to plant a garden, to tour his garden (his bedroom? Reviews of The Botany of Desire April 30, 2001 “Pollan shines a light on our own nature as well as our implication in the natural world.” —The New York Times “[Pollan] has a wide-ranging intellect, an eager grasp of evolutionary We’d love your help. His prose is unrivaled, and he draws readers into his narrative with seamless ease. The Botany of Desire is obviously trying to entice people into watching a … Pollan takes his readers on an odyssey through the natural histories of four plants that have been important to the course of human history, and relates them to a certain form of desire that he believes to be inherent in each and every person. This book had highs and lows but I the "strange" aspect is a reflection of emotional tone and style, The Omnivores dilemma was my favorite book of his. We’re all aware of the co-evolutionary relationship between bees and flowers : the flowers open their petals to the bees, who buzz from flower to flower, collecting pollen and nectar and spreading the plants’ genes in the process. Just wow! ), to only eat organic food, and to find out the story and origin of every morsel of food I put in my body. what? Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Mark A Super Reviewer Feb 24, 2010 Lopsided and a bit misdirected, but overall entertaining and informative. Chef, writer, and cookbook author Samin Nosrat's first book Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking not only... Every schoolchild learns about the mutually beneficial dance of honeybees and flowers: The bee collects nectar and pollen to make honey and, in the process, spreads the flowers’ genes far and wide. what? In. Too much navel-gazing and not enough substance. —The New Yorker, “We can give no higher praise to the work of this superb science writer/reporter than to say that his new book is as exciting as any you’ll read.” UC Berkeley Events 367,303 views 1:11:42 Botany in … In telling the stories of four familiar plant species that are deeply woven into the just as a warning, the below is not really about the book by pollan at all (which is great, btw! Pollan represents one of my favorite types of writers: modern polymaths who can bring scientific, historic and literary knowledge to bear on whatever they're writing about. Slow book and kind of strange. Pollan is sometimes whimsical ... he writes in a way that is like no other author. Gave it as a gift on a couple of. But we’l. This is an enjoyable book that wanders back and forth through the subjects of botany, history, and literary philosophy. Inside you'll find 30 Daily Lessons, 20 Fun Activities, 180 Multiple Choice Questions, 60 Short Essay Questions, 20 Essay Hell, that's what the author's introduction led me to expect, too. The premise was a good one, but Pollan's writing style drove me up the wall. —The New York Times, “[Pollan] has a wide-ranging intellect, an eager grasp of evolutionary biology and a subversive streak that helps him to root out some wonderfully counterintuitive points. ISBN 0-375-50129-0 Johnny Appleseed’s efforts were to the overwhelming advantage of apple genetic proliferation, and the science of mass potato farming means more seeds are planted every year. Quick Facts on The Botany of Desire When looking for books about nutrition and eating, it’s hard not to stumble up Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma and In Defense of Food. All rights reserved. Book Review: The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World. I read this a few days after "The Omnivore's Dilemma", and began it the day after picking up "In Defense of Food". The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World is a 2001 nonfiction book by journalist Michael Pollan. Dratted industry and their shipping lives, appearance over taste, money over environmental responsibility; dratted consumers and our being trapped in busy schedules, cheap produce, the quick&easy, the short range. The conversation between history, literature and science really interests me, though, which is why nearly all of the books I read fall into one of those categories. ), but is mostly some really juvenile hatin' on thoreau. Pollan takes his readers on an odyssey through the natural histories of four plants that have been important to the course of human history, and relates them to a certain form of desire that he believes to be inherent in each and every person. —Los Angeles Times, “Until I read Michael Pollan’s original, provocative and charming The Botany of Desire, I had never managed to get inside the soul of a plant. It is a stunning insight, and no one will come away from this book without having their ideas of nature stretched and challenged. short, and by all means worth reading if it's all you have available. I called it quits when he started analogizing Johnny Appleseed and Dionysius. But this is not a review of those books. Aside from making me incredibly sad at not having a garden patch anymore in my home and having to contend with purchased pots and soil, this book was a delightful read. Dratted industry and their shipping lives, ap. Johnny Appleseed’s efforts were to the overwhelming advantage of apple genetic proliferation, and the science of mass potato farming means more seeds are planted every year. He talks about 4 crops: apples, potatoes, tulips and marijuana, and the interactions between them and humans: history, culture, human psychology, and science, etc. New York: Random House. Did anyone else Think so ? It's so beautifully written and full of wonder at the plant world. Mr. Pollan, an accomplished gardener and garden writer, presents a plant’s-eye view of the world that challenged some of my most basic assumptions about gardening, particularly the one about whether I control my lilies or they control me. Okay, okay, books by Michael Pollan are clearly a fad right now, but I have bought into it whole-heartedly. But he does it in a way that isn't overly preachy or agenda-driven. He masterfully links four fundamental human desires--sweetness, beauty Best of all, Pollan really loves plants.” (119)”, Borders Original Voices Award for Nonfiction (2001). A brief but compelling history of four plants whose genetic destiny has been markedly altered by man – the apple, the tulip, cannabis, and the potato. This may be my favorite Pollan book of all time. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World at Amazon.com. He talks about 4 crops: apples, potatoes, tulips and marijuana, and the interactions between them and humans: history, culture, human psychology, and science, etc. I had it sit in my library of blinks for a while, thinking it had something to do with how plants influence sex, for example explaining aphrodisiacs. Michael Pollan has convinced me to buy only organic potatoes from now on. Clearly the number four has no such associations for Michael Pollan. This was the "broomstick" by which these women were said to travel. Well, I was kind of familiar with marijuana's development (not from personal toking, honest Asian, but from being surrounded by tokers - hey, it was Oregon) and that it was completely villified in the "just say no" era of drug awareness education. the potato chapter was great, the marijuana chapter irritating, the tulip chapter needlessly verbose (but full of some of the book's best trivia), the apple chapter...quixotic. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. You might not think the story of a plant would be very compelling, but as our Plaza Branch Barista’s Book Club learned, Pollan intrigues readers through careful management of historical facts, research, and personal anecdotes. The science. Refresh and try again. Wow! Michael Pollan approaches the relationship between plants and humans through the aperture of the plant. This was a total surprise, and a great one. The time spent on talking heads is reasonable for a documentary, and much of the time "A bumblebee would probably... regard himself as a subject in the garden and the bloom he's plundering for its drop of nectar as an object. Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our … The altered perspective displays the multiple props of genetic diversity — color, shape, size, fragrance, taste and robustness — offered to seduce the gardener's favors. Mr. Pollan disabused me of my anthropocentric ignorance. I've wanted to read this book ever since it came out, but, so far, I've been pretty deeply disappointed by it. Their potion recipes called for such things as datura, opium poppies, belladona, hashish, fly-agaric mushrooms (Amanita muscaria), and the skin of toads (which can contain DMT, a powerful hallucinogen). This is a marvellous book, which discusses the science, sociology, aesthetics and culture, relating to four plants. In his elegant sections on marijuana and potatoes, Mr. Pollan braids together cosmic ideas, conversations with experts and day-to-day reports from his own garden. An example of the later is quoted below: everyone, unless they loathe all non-fiction, I really enjoyed this book (and enjoyed the lecture I attended when the author talked about the book and answered questions.) Okay, okay, books by Michael Pollan are clearly a fad right now, but I have bought into it whole-heartedly. Mr. Pollan’s discussion of the genetically engineered NewLeaf potato, which was devised to resist its most dreaded enemy, the Colorado potato beetle, is a lucid and balanced assessment of this new horticultural technology, a subject too often tackled with barely muffled hysteria.” We first came to understand the way cells work through botany. I really enjoyed this book (and enjoyed the lecture I attended when the author talked about the book and answered questions.) The other two contributors... Reading the transcript of … “Pollan shines a light on our own nature as well as our implication in the natural world.” I took many a too-long lunch break because I was so hooked. THE BOTANY OF DESIRE 2 9/22/09 ©Kikim Media 2009 Michael Pollan: It was that very special week in May when the apple trees are in spectacular bloom and they're just vibrating with the attention of bees. We first came to understand the way cells work through botany. In The Botany of Desire, Pollan makes a persuasive case that the plants we might be tempted to see as having been most domesticated by humanity are in fact also those that have been most effective in domesticating us. He chronicles the potato (sustenance), the tulip (beauty), cannabis (pleasure), and the apple (sweet. In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship. In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan ingeniously demonstrates how people and domesticated plants have formed a similarly reciprocal relationship. These ingredients would be combined in a hempseed-oil-based "flying ointment" that the witches would then administer vaginally using a special dildo. The chapters on the apple, tulip, and potato offer cautionary evidence on the danger of destroying diversity in the name of commerce. But we’ll get to the argument bit in a minute. Instead, he lets you get what he is saying while at the same time telling an engaging, well-researched story. But he does it in a way that isn't overly preachy or agenda-driven. Pollan's The Botany of Desire is by far one of the best books I have ever read, and it is one of those books that has changed my world view for the better. Pollan does a superb job of weaving together how humans effectively adopted Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Botany of Desire at Amazon.com. He is an amazing, amazing writer: he makes me want to plant a garden, to tour his garden (his bedroom? Michael Pollan takes a simple question - Have we domesticated plants or have plants domesticated us?- and to make a case for the latter, provides us with a heady mix of history,science,philosophy,botany,literature and what not, punctuating the text with juicy anecdotes, which I must say made for a truly spell-binding read. I knew nothing much about botany and have never been particularly interested in that branch of science, but this book was a very easy read and I found it extremely fascinating. Of course Pollan realizes that intent cannot be ascribed to the plant. This is because it sounds a bit like the word for death. —The New York Times Book Review, “A wry, informed pastoral.” The Botany of Desire is my favorite of Pollan's book-length works, and his lecture is a lovely taste of the book as a whole. The Botany of Desire is all about the evolutionary co-partnership plants have with humans: in particular, apple, tulip, marijuana, and potato plants. Aside from making me incredibly sad at not having a garden patch anymore in my home and having to contend with purchased pots and soil, this book was a delightful read. Caffeine: How coffee and tea created the modern world, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Young Readers Edition. The Botany of Desire The domestication of animals has given us many advantages such as four-legged hunting partners, faster means of transportation, and the convenience of plucking the day’s meal out of the backyard rather than risking life and limb tracking it for miles. Four common plants and I didn't know they each held such a rich history. Even the description made it look doubtful that it would be my cup of tea. Pollan’s argument is that, though we see domestication as a strictly top-down, subject-to-object process, there really may also be some co-evolutionary force at work. “The Botany of Desire” is Mr. Pollan’s first book to be adapted for television and, he says, his favorite of all his works. Start by marking “The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World” as Want to Read: Error rating book. We study botany because plants have a lot of information to share with us. ), to only eat organic food, and to find out the story and origin of every morsel of food I put in my body. I knew nothing much about botany and have never been particularly interested in that branch of science, but this book was a very easy read and I found it extremely fascinating. June 12th 2001 I love books that open my eyes, teach me something, and even go so far as to re-educate me on the fallacies foisted upon me by ill-informed elementary school teachers. this was like NPR in printed form, and felt intended to be read in that medium. “For it is only by forgetting that we ever really drop the thread of time and approach the experience of living in the present moment, so elusive in ordinary hours.”, “Witches and sorcerers cultivated plants with the power to "cast spells" -- in our vocabulary, "psychoactive" plants. He is very emotional and at the same time very scientific and logical, that is not a common group of traits in my opinion. Welcome back. —Chicago Tribune, “Funny, interesting and as delicious as a slice of summer peach … a must for people who like a good story.” It may sound like science fiction, but let me assure you... it's not. it's all grotesquely bucolic, and the lack of any synthesis at the end left me underwhelmed. Boy, was I wrong! The Botany Of Desire Review The only complaint I have about The Botany Of Desire is that the title is misleading. so if you read it, shut up, i warned you; i needed to get some trash-talking out of my system before going on w/ my day. The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan introduces the possibility to the reader that plants are using insects, animals and humans to ensure their own survival. This was another museum book club pick from our Minneapolis Institute of Art; while I like Michael Pollan it's unlikely I would have otherwise read this fascinating book. The Botany of Desire is a very well done, enjoyable, and informative documentary, though with some flaws. To see what your friends thought of this book, Pollan is sometimes whimsical ... he writes in a way that is like no other author. Making my little rows and putting in my chunks. To that last end, I found the chapter on Johnny Appleseed very enlightening as well as highly entertaining. In East Asian cultures – according to my increasingly Japanese daughters – the number four brings bad luck. Michael Pollan wrote beautifully, made extremely valid points, and explained each plant in 3.5 stars, 'Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat' Author Shares Some Favorite Cookbooks. Michael Pollan: "Cannabis, The Importance of Forgetting, and the Botany of Desire" - Duration: 1:11:42. Well, I was kind of familiar with marijuana's development (not from personal toking, honest Asian, but from being surrounded by tokers - hey, it was Oregon) and that it was completely villified in the "just say no" era of drug awareness education. These are merely the standard tools available to the plant for survival and procreation. The Botany of Desire lesson plan contains a variety of teaching materials that cater to all learning styles. —New York Daily News. —The Wall Street Journal, “A don’t-wanna-put-it-down unspooling of the socio-political, economic and historical forces that led to the cultivation of four crops. William Ballard - March 02, 2018 It's always fun to read Michael Pollan books In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan argues that the answer lies at the heart of the intimately reciprocal relationship between people and plants. ''The Botany of Desire'' is full of such moments -- moments when the thickets of rhetoric and supposition clear, and the reader stumbles onto a thesis as elegant and orderly as an apple orchard. Elizabeth Gilbert’s novel “The Signature of All Things” is about a botanist whose hunger for explanations carries her through the better part of Darwin’s century. —Entertainment Weekly, “A whimsical, literary romp through man’s perpetually frustrating and always unpredictable relationship with nature.” See all 4 questions about The Botany of Desire…, Popsugar 2020 - A Book by or about a Journalist, Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, The Botany of Desire / Michael Pollan. The cinematography is gorgeous. His prose both shimmers and snaps, and he has a knack for finding perfect quotes in the oddest places. by Random House, The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World. Pollan’s argument is that, though we see domestication as a strictly top-down, subject-to-object process, there really may also be some co-evolutionary force at work. There are currently 9 reader reviews for The Botany of Desire He chronicles the potato (sustenance), the tulip (beauty), cannabis (pleasure), and the apple (sweetness). An interesting book about the symbiosis between all living organism and how Charles Darwin's evolutionary theory of natural selection is happening. Four common plants and I didn't know they each held such a rich history. The section on tulips as a flower embodying Apollo and Dionysus and about the apple were just brilliant. Pollan is a master at making connections, seeing the lines that connect disparate dots in the complexities of the garden, be they of a political, literary, historical, socioeconomic or, even, sexual realm.” Packed with food-related history, trivia and stories, Michael Pollan attempts to explain how four types of plants have had such a large effect on humanity. He masterfully links four fundamental human desires—sweetness, beauty, intoxication, and control—with the plants that satisfy them: the apple, the tulip, marijuana, and the potato. A brief but compelling history of four plants whose genetic destiny has been markedly altered by man – the apple, the tulip, cannabis, and the potato. From the jacket copy and reviews I'd read, I'd come to expect a poetic lay-science book about the entwined destinies of plants and humans. And I was planting potatoes. I loved the former, thought the latter was thin and a resaying of what he'd already said. He is very emotional and at the same time very scientific and logic. When it's done well, I don't care what the question is; for instance, tulips aren't really my thing, despite their presence on my dining room table right now. We study botany because plants have a lot of information to share with us. Michael Pollan takes a simple question - Have we domesticated plants or have plants domesticated us?- and to make a case for the latter, provides us with a heady mix of history,science,philosophy,botany,literature and w. This is the best piece of anything that I've ever read on gardening, even though its not entirely on gardening. I couldn't get into this book at all and gave up reading it after the first chapter. Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. Michael Pollan likes bees, and mentions them frequently in _The Botany of Desire: A Plant's Eye View of the World_ (Random House). Pollan presents case studies that mirror four types of human desires that are reflected in the way that we selectively grow, breed, and genetically engineer our plants. The Botany of Desire reader reviews and comments, and links to write your own review (Page 1 of 2). © 2020 Michael Pollan. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World at Amazon.com. Instead, he lets you get what he is saying while at the same time telling an engaging, well-researched story, both personal and historic, and one that made me want to read quickly to the very end. But we know that this is just a … Pollan's The Botany of Desire is by far one of the best books I have ever read, and it is one of those books that has changed my world view for the better. In The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World, Pollan builds on his former work and demonstrates how humans and plants have formed reciprocal relationships. and the bees were working above me. The Botany of Desire deserves a solid 4.5 stars out of 5. As beguiling as the plants this book enlightened me about. 2001. Great book, The Botany of Desire: A Plants-Eye View of the World pdf is enough to raise the goose bumps alone.
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