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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/19/2018 in all areas

  1. The text below is my proposed post advising new members how to help us help them. Get out your red pencils and razor blades and post your suggestions, edits, etc. Hopefully we can come up with something to make it easier and faster to answer ID questions. Thanks! New Members - How to Request a SUCCESSFUL Bird ID! Welcome! We understand you're excited to learn about that mystery bird you saw, and we're delighted to help. Some of our members can give you an answer based on a surprisingly small amount of data. Still, the more information you can provide, the more likely we'll be able to give you a correct identification. At a minimum, please include these items: ⦁ Where did you see the bird? Please tell us what state or province you were in. Other useful items are geographic region, city or county, local or national park, body of water, etc. ⦁ When did you see the bird? Often the month is enough, although the day or week is better. Time of day is also useful (early morning, middle of the night, etc.) ⦁ If you don't have a photo, tell us the physical details you remember. What colors were the head, body, wings, and tail? Can you compare the mystery bird to a bird you're already familiar with? Was it smaller, fatter, longer necked, shorter tailed, etc.? ⦁ If you do have a photo, you can link to most popular photo sharing sites. That information is usually enough, but some birds are very similar. These items can be useful in narrowing down the options: ⦁ If you think you know what the bird is, please include the bird's name and location in your post's title. For example, "Carolina Wren in Eastern Kentucky?" ⦁ What was the local environment? Was the bird in a forest, desert, beach, urban area, etc.? Was it raining, snowing, windy, etc.? ⦁ What was the bird doing? Was it hopping, flying, singing, sitting still, etc.? If it was eating, could you tell what it was having for lunch? ⦁ Were there other birds? Did they look like the mystery bird or were they different? Were there a few of them or many? Please limit your requests to three birds per post. When there are more than three ID requests in a single post, it becomes difficult to follow the discussions for each bird. Also, please submit only three posts at a time. Please be patient. We have many active members, but we aren't Facebook or Twitter. It may be a few hours before our members respond, especially your request requires research. If you don't have a reply within 24 hours, feel free to 'Bump' your question. Sometimes a bird can't be identified. All of us here have had sightings and photos that left us scratching our heads. That's just part of birding. Thanks for joining us! We hope you come to enjoy birding as much as we do.
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  3. When you edit you have a check box at the bottom you can click on if you want to show that the post was edited, and a space where you can write the reason. I just checked and the default is that the show edit box is unchecked, so it's not automatic.
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  4. Thanks akiley! I did try to brighten them up but even then they had a richer tone than what I'm used to. That said, I'm usually based in Texas, so maybe our killer sun makes me see things weirdly. ;-) Had a great time along your coast, btw! Nice to see some birds in breeding colors (semi. plovers, e.g.) that are always washed out by the time they migrate through our area. Thanks again
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  5. Hi from a Connecticut birder! These are indeed Semipalmated Sandpipers. The photos are rather underexposed, which is likely why the bird doesn't appear very pale. Birds can look quote different in the field depending on lighting conditions, or appear different in photos due to exposure, or other camera settings/factors.
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  6. I definitely do not want a limit on editing a post. I am bad about typos and I like to fix them when possible. I once misspelled The Bird Nuts name! Thankfully I was able to fix it. Also I am not all that jazzed about the post automatically showing an edit. In most cases it doesn't do anything for me to know that a post has been edited. In the past, the site admin could tell what had transpired in a post and that seems good enough.
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  7. I saw these birds recently at crescent lake national wildlife refuge in Nebraska. At first I thought the sandpiper was a Baird's Sandpiper but taking another look through the photos I'm not so sure (because of the yellow legs). The second photo shows two birds which I first thought were Wilson's Phalaropes but again the yellow legs are throwing me off. I am very confused for both so any help is appreciated :).
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  8. The wren looks good for House. There's virtually no eye-line, he's barred not spotted above, and the bill's pale-based and not long enough for Rock Wren.
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  9. On the Baird's, I think that what you're perceiving as yellow legs is actually a bent-over grass blade. The legs are visible just to the right of it, and they're shaded enough that you can't tell the color.
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  10. I am going to go with a juvenile Sabine's, based on the lack of any consistent ear patch or black wing lines (especially in the 2nd photo). It could easily be a opossum in a gull costume as well! ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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  11. For some reason I’m having trouble with the wren, does it not looks better for House?
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  12. 1) Vesper Sparrow. That chestnut colored patch at the base of the wing (covert) is distinctive. 2) Say's Phoebe I think. 3) Rock Wren.
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  13. In addition to various shape/structure clues that are hard for me to explain in words, Ruffs also have short, and slightly downcurved bills. Note the short but perfectly straight bill here, typical of LEYE.
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  14. Looks like a young Black-legged Kittiwake to me.
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  15. Thanks, @MerMaeve. In that habitat around here the only two choices are Warbling and Plumbeous, and I can tell it's not Plumbeous. (I admit I got my one and only White-eyed Vireo in the same preserve, and other vagrants could show up, but nobody's reported any such thing.)
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  16. I wouldn't be so frustrated if I knew what the current limit is and how long between resets. I think I've asked twice but may have missed the answer. A limit is much easier to deal with when you know what it is.
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  17. Yep, that's my photo! Yup!
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  18. Estes Park, CO, Rocky Mountain National Park, July 13, 2018. The bird list for this area does't include the Ruby-throated Hummingbird, but it sure looks the ones in Arkansas. https://flic.kr/p/29g4DcT
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  19. Thank you! ... and thank you for the observation about not taking ID for granted.
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  20. Taken a couple of weeks ago north of San Diego. I think a first year Bullock's Oriole.
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  21. This is a great example of how poorly we eastern birders really know our own Ruby-throats. (No need to really look closely, since there's nothing to confuse them with.) This is a male Broad-tailed Hummingbird. From this shot, good things to look at are the absence of a black mask and the rosy rather than ruby red color on the throat.
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  22. I'm one who is guilty of not always putting in the location. I link to Flikr, and the information is under the photo. I will correct my mistake in future posts. The information you are working on is very good. I read it all, and understand the process much better. Thank you!
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  23. On the scoters, look at the shape of the feathering at the base of the bill. On Surf, it forms that neat rectangle around the base of the bill. On White-winged, it will extend forwards almost to the nostrils. From a distance, this makes for different shapes in the front white spot -- ending at a vertical line on Surf, as an oval on White-winged.
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  24. I would say female Surf Scoter for the first, and Greater Scaup on the second bird. The nail appears to be spread out just a little and the head profile looks like Greater to me.
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  25. Croatan National Forest, Carteret Co., North Carolina
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  26. Agree with Clay-colored for 2.
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  27. #2 does look good for Clay-colored.
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  28. My most recent lifer (as of this writing) is the Wedge-tailed Shearwater:
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  29. Cattle egret Cattle Egret anahauc nwr 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
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  30. From a several weeks ago but just uploaded yesterday. Piping Plover (F) Piping Plover (F) by Johnny, on Flickr Common Goldeneye Common Goldeneye by Johnny, on Flickr
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  31. I was thrilled to see this one fly out of a waterfall in Oregon. DSC07662r American Dipper by Mark Ross, on Flickr
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  32. Juvi Yellow crowned Night Heron anahauc NWR 7-18 Yellow crowned Night Heron anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
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  33. Early morning Northern Bobwhite
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  34. Living in AZ, this Red headed woodpecker is a lifer for me taken in FL
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