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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/30/2018 in all areas

  1. A good way to start is to get a field guide for your area. Spend some time over lunch just browsing through it. You'll notice that birds with similar shapes are grouped together. Then when you see a bird like your plover, you'll have a rough idea what type of bird it is and where in the guide to look for it. And don't worry about being unskilled. Everybody was unskilled at some point (and some of us still are!). The idea is to have fun, not stress out.
    4 points
  2. Aurora Borealis from north central Oregon.
    3 points
  3. Scaly-breasted Mannikins are indeed not native to California, but they appear to have established themselves there. (They've been in Hawaii for quite a while now...) They are in the family Estrildidae, with the waxbills. "Finch" is an imprecise term, often used to refer to any little bird with a seed-eater's bill, but most of our finches are in the family Fringillidae. Grosbeak is another term without a taxonomic meaning -- just here in the US, Evening and Pine Grosbeaks are in the Fringillidae, whereas Rose-breasted, Black-headed, and Yellow are in the Cardinalidae.
    3 points
  4. The OP's bird is a Yellow Warbler. The apparent black cap is a shadow -- the clinching mark is the yellow visible in the tail. Our only other warbler with yellow in the tail is American Redstart, and they only show it in the basal half. Wilson's have an entirely gray undertail that contrasts well with the undertail coverts.
    3 points
  5. White River Falls in north central Oregon.
    2 points
  6. Prairie Warbler by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    2 points
  7. Eastern Sierras The Mitten, Navajo Tribal Park, Monument Valley, AZ.
    2 points
  8. Seen today on Bastian Island just south of Empire Louisiana. 2 individuals 1. Possible young? 2.
    1 point
  9. A few days old, but in my defense I just got back from my trip 😛 Black Skimmer with chicks, Navarre, FL by Christopher Clark, on Flickr
    1 point
  10. I can agree with Psweet, plus a lot of ducks are molting right now, which can make for some odd looking birds.
    1 point
  11. They do lose the spots, but these look like juveniles -- the triple bars on the wing coverts are good marks for that.
    1 point
  12. The flying bird is a Common Nighthawk. I'm not sure about the first one -- at that age, I'm not sure how to rule out Chuck-will's Widow.
    1 point
  13. The white duck is indeed a domestic. The others appear to be at least part Mallard (domestic or Black Duck ancestors wouldn't be surprising) -- white in the tail and flank feathers with internal barring are Mallard traits.
    1 point
  14. Yes, Spotted Sandpipers
    1 point
  15. I see that. Thanks
    1 point
  16. Notice the stockier, shorter bill.
    1 point
  17. My first thought was that there was too much tail for a Calliope, but after a quick check, I think you're right. (Although, this is one of the species where you shouldn't be allowed to count it until you've seen a breeding male -- they're spectacular.)
    1 point
  18. Juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird.
    1 point
  19. So the original guess of a grosbeak was in the right family.
    1 point
  20. "Sounds like a Red-Winged Blackbird", says the half-deaf guy.
    1 point
  21. Older field guides may use the previous name for the bird, Nutmeg Mannikin. A member of the finch family.
    1 point
  22. Welcome. You must be in Calif or Texas. This is an introduced species....Scaly Brested Munia.
    1 point
  23. On these hot days you gotta use what ever shade you can grow!
    1 point
  24. Looks like another Coop. Sharpies have blurrier streaking below and less graduated tails. Also, if you're not up in the mountains, it's probably too early to expect Sharpies.
    1 point
  25. ??????????????? Your picture didn't embed correctly.
    1 point
  26. That is for sure the way to ID Tree and violent green. So great observation
    1 point
  27. Perfect! Thank you so much😊
    1 point
  28. Looks like a Red-winged Blackbird.
    1 point
  29. I found mine on the internet.
    1 point
  30. Yes, Violet-green Swallow
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Agreed!! I’ll pay for the travel expenses, and you get ALL of the EUSTs and HOSPs.
    1 point
  33. Someone should round up all of the starlings and House Sparrows and take them back to Eurasia where they belong.
    1 point
  34. There's always a rebel in the group.
    1 point
  35. Mount Shasta Florence Oregon waterfront
    1 point
  36. Phinizy Swamp and Nature Park, Augusta, GA
    1 point
  37. Tallulah Gorge, Georgia
    1 point
  38. Milky Way over Center Ridge School. Wasco County, Oregon
    1 point
  39. Thanks, @Liam ! I'm glad this riddle was solved. I looked at this photo for about 15 minutes this morning and couldn't commit one way or the other. It didn't look right for a mature BHNU, but eBird had no record of a PYNU this side of the Great Plains.
    1 point
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