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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/03/2018 in all areas

  1. I disagree on the handout. More like looking for something to steal.
    3 points
  2. That looks like it might just be staining, or even just wet feathers from hitting the water.
    2 points
  3. I thought this bird was reclassified as a “Parkinglot Sparrow” 🤔
    2 points
  4. I have 3 feeders.....1 each at the front, side, and back of the house. The dominant Anna's male here tries to control the back feeder and another one tries to control the front. Right now I have more Hummers around than I can count, with the resident Anna's and migrant Black-chinneds and all their offspring of the year all wanting to feed! My best guess is somewhere between 12 to 20 Hummers around. It's a constant battle, with 3 or 4 feeding from the same feeder(s) at a time until the male comes swooping in and tries to chase them all off. Then it's a free-for-all!! It's fun to watch them, and if I happen to be out by a feeder they buzz by close enough to feel the wind from their wings. I'm having to fill the back feeder daily, and the other 2 every 1-1/2 to 2 days. They're very entertaining to watch, to say the least!
    2 points
  5. Black-crowned Night-Heron w/ Catch of the Day (#3 of 3) Black-crowned Night-Heron by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  6. Oh...I'm a bit slow today. 😁
    1 point
  7. Thank you! That's a new one for me!
    1 point
  8. I cropped it a bit more and upped the exposure adjustment. It does lose some detail when uploading, so I hope this helps. Note: The head is a brownish color on my monitor.
    1 point
  9. Hmmm.....I get LOTS of Savannah and Clay-colored sparrows both at this particular platform feeder.
    1 point
  10. Like I said in the iBIRD Group it really is necessary to have two ID forums for North American birds. Here is what I said. If no one minds I'm going to remove this post as I agree having the ID in two places IS confusing.
    1 point
  11. Someone I know had this friendly bird visit a riding lesson in Alberta, Canada recently. I.D.?
    1 point
  12. Hi- welcome back! This is actually another Bobolink- female or immature.
    1 point
  13. 1+2) Definitely subadult Cali Gulls 3) Looks like a fresh juvenile California 4) Adult Heermann's 5) Young Western 6) Heermann's 7) Western
    1 point
  14. Not the best pictures, but definitely the coolest thing I saw yesterday. Momma rail and babies
    1 point
  15. I think you did pretty good with your flight shot, except for the noise(grain). As you pointed out, 1/200 is pretty slow for an action shot so capturing more than just a blur is something to be proud of. When you have to push your ISO up as high as 6400 you're going to get a lot of noise, unless you have exceptionally good equipment. More light will allow you to lower the ISO with the added advantage of being able to go with a faster shutter speed, so yes, the best solution is to get out there when there's more light. Then again, if you have bottomless pockets, you could buy a full frame camera and an f/2.8 lens and see if that would worked for you.
    1 point
  16. I believe all western gulls
    1 point
  17. I hate gulls, here are some guesses #1 and 2 California Gull??? #3 unknown #4 Herman’s? # 5??? #6 hermans #7 Western gull
    1 point
  18. Based on the amount of red, I think you are correct with Red Masked.
    1 point
  19. How close did you manage to get for this shot? After wanting to see one for nearly a year, I finally got a look at some Black-crowned Night Herons! This was in the evening, but there's a lot of grain. Anyone have tips? The first one was shot at 1/200 second, wide open (f/6.3) and 6400 iso. That's a very high iso, but I feel like the shutter speed was already a bit low as it is. The second was 1/60 second, but that was after I'd gotten my tripod out. Is the best solution just to go out when there's more light?
    1 point
  20. MN : Same person after the bath. Looks like a smile or something :
    1 point
  21. Definitely GRCA, aged as a juvenile by the fleshy gape visible here.
    1 point
  22. Think of them the same way you would barnyard chickens, ducks, or geese.
    1 point
  23. The word domestic means simply that a population has been changed through human selective breeding -- even plants can be domesticated. (Just about all of our food crops are.) There are plenty of populations of domestic animals living in the wild -- Rock Pigeons and wild Mustangs are both examples here in the US. (The term feral is often used to refer to domestic species living in the wild.) In this case, though, I'm not aware of any established populations of guineafowl in New York -- the habitat really doesn't fit. So it's almost certainly an escape.
    1 point
  24. 8-1-18 MN : I laughed so hard... he caught the fish though.
    1 point
  25. Oh, and an Acadian Flycatcher would also be greener with an orange lower mandible plus a white eyering.
    1 point
  26. The beak appears to be completely black and the brownish color looks better for an Eastern Phoebe to me. The cinnamon wingbars are indicative of a youngster. Eastern Wood-Pewees have longer primary projection and both Wood-Pewees and Traill's are usually a more green/gray color and have orange lower mandibles.
    1 point
  27. A few days old, but in my defense I just got back from my trip 😛 Black Skimmer with chicks, Navarre, FL by Christopher Clark, on Flickr
    1 point
  28. So we just post our bird photos? *confused...........* 65. American Black Duck American Black Duck by MerMaeve, on Flickr 66. Green Heron Green Heron by MerMaeve, on Flickr 67. White-Crowned Sparrow White-Crowned Sparrow by MerMaeve, on Flickr 68. Lincoln's Sparrow Lincoln's Sparrow by MerMaeve, on Flickr 69. Orchard Oriole Orchard Oriole by MerMaeve, on Flickr 70. Herring Gull Herring Gull by MerMaeve, on Flickr 71. Red-winged Blackbird Red-winged Blackbird by MerMaeve, on Flickr 72. Black-necked Stilt Lifer Black-necked Stilt by MerMaeve, on Flickr 73. Brown Creeper Brown Creeper! by MerMaeve, on Flickr 74. Snowy Owl Snowy Owl.... by MerMaeve, on Flickr 75. Dark-eyed Junco Dark-eyed Junco close up by MerMaeve, on Flickr
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. Shortnose gar taking a breath
    1 point
  31. Orchard Oriole by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  32. Western Wood-Pewee by jeffroscoe, on Flickr
    1 point
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