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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/07/2018 in all areas

  1. Yellow it is ! How about a Yellow Warbler ? Light as a Feather !
    4 points
  2. Immature Osprey caught up close at the San Joaquin Marsh Ecological Reserve in Irvine, CA
    3 points
  3. Had a nice Roseate Tern today! Roseate Tern by Patrick Felker, on Flickr
    3 points
  4. Continous focus is usually what you would use for flying birds, HOwever,there are so many variables,One is shutter Speed,you need a minimum of 1600 for a shutter speed to catch something flying, focus is a catch all, i use single point but many others I know use group,I am comfortable with single point and confident with it so thats what I use, try to get as close as possible that will get you better pics, Do a search on youtube for flying birds and photos and you will find a lot of videos to get you started...
    3 points
  5. More Yellow ? How about a Common Yellowthroat ? Here is an example of a handsome adult male.
    2 points
  6. The Chukar I subscribe to an App that notifies me when an unusual bird shows up in my area and sure enough, this one was right where they said he would be ! This guy is certainly unusual on the Coast of New Hampshire across the street from the beach ! He certainly didn't fly here with those stubby little wings and plump little body ; - ) He was very friendly and calm, my presence was obviously no cause of concern to him. Every bit the handsome, self assured gentleman. I swear if I had some cracked corn he would have come to my hand ! Likely an escapee from some nearby farm, it was a pleasure to have made his acquaintance.
    2 points
  7. Immature Red-tailed Hawk. I met this guy on a jobsite near Canobie Lake in Salem, NH. It was great fun to watch him throw his small stick in the air and pounce on it over and over. Preoccupied with his exercise he (?) paid me little mind and allowed me to get pretty close for some nice shots.
    2 points
  8. Yes, looks like a young one.
    1 point
  9. That’s a lot of species, and I believe the bird you saw the most was my favorite.
    1 point
  10. Great Crested Flycatcher in photo 1. Photo 2 is the GCFL on the left and a Summer Tanager on the right.
    1 point
  11. Bird 1 looks like a female Brown Headed Cowbird to me. Bird 2....I'm bad enough with Flycatchers in the East, so Western ones would be even worse. That being said, the wing bars look good for a Pewee, but you're right, that bill looks really big. Maybe wait for the experts on that one.
    1 point
  12. 1 point
  13. Thanks! I'll definitely keep working on it. For now, how about some yellow! (Yellow is one of my favorite colors, so I'm glad some of the birds decided to hang out near the flowers.) More yellow, for good measure:
    1 point
  14. Yes to the Saltmarsh and GW Teal. Not sure on the tern but I'd lean towards Common if I had to choose.
    1 point
  15. Me either. I just saw my first Semipalmated two days ago.
    1 point
  16. I ran the 1st set of photos through photo sleuth for fun (because I don’t have a lot of experience with shore birds yet, thus think they’re horrible) it agreed with @HamRHead on all counts! Almost so easy it takes the fun out of learning! #icanfinallystartaddinggullstomylifelist
    1 point
  17. The first bird looks like a Red-tailed. I'd say Coopers for the second. Wait for additional input.
    1 point
  18. Photo 1: 3 Leasts and a Semi on the far right Photo 2: Both Least. Pecs are larger overall are have a different shape/structure (bulky, etc), as well as differences in bill color. There aren't any Pecs in these photos.
    1 point
  19. I agree with this.
    1 point
  20. Large plump bird with long down curved bill is a dead giveaway. Whimbrel confirmed. Nice picture too.
    1 point
  21. Wait for the pros but in the interval here's a shot at it 1. Solitary 2. Least 3. Semi 4. Least 5. Semi
    1 point
  22. Thanks, akiley!
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. Yep, it's a Whimbrel
    1 point
  25. Appears to be a female Black-throated Blue Warbler.
    1 point
  26. I respectfully disagree with Aveschapines. I think the off topic sections, including the sub-forums for mammals, reptiles, butterflies, etc., is a large part of what made the old website so popular. Instead of members leaving the website and coming back hours or days later to check the ID forum, I believe the old off topic forums often kept the members(experts) here on the website where they would continue to monitor the ID forums for new activity while entertaining themselves with the off topic sections in between bird IDs. Some of the site's best birders would often offer their knowledge in the other wildlife forums, that's what made some of those sub-forums so popular, like the butterfly and dragonfly sub-forums. I think it's better to attract/keep people's attention with a few extra forums than to have them get bored and surf away to another website. Again, just sharing thoughts here.
    1 point
  27. I've recently been enjoying watching Osprey fish. They slowly circle overhead and, once they see something, they stop circling and begin descending. Slowly at first, then quickly into the water. It's interesting because you can tell when they see something, just by the way they fly. This one seemed interested in me too. I wonder what it was thinking as it flew by, watching a person on the ground staring up at it.
    1 point
  28. White-tailed Kite by Jason, on Flickr
    1 point
  29. The gape is the corner of the mouth. On juvenile passerines, there's a fleshy protrusion, usually yellow, that serves to attract a parent's attention when they're begging for food -- that's what birders mean when they talk about "a distinct gape". The mouth itself isn't any bigger on youngsters than an adults, and if there is a difference in bill length, the adults are going to have larger bills.
    1 point
  30. Awesome photo. Pileated Woodpeckers are my arch enemy. I live in a log house - they can peck a hole the size around of a tennis ball in a window frame in just a few minutes. And they aren't easily scared off, without coming right back.
    1 point
  31. I have 3 feeders.....1 each at the front, side, and back of the house. The dominant Anna's male here tries to control the back feeder and another one tries to control the front. Right now I have more Hummers around than I can count, with the resident Anna's and migrant Black-chinneds and all their offspring of the year all wanting to feed! My best guess is somewhere between 12 to 20 Hummers around. It's a constant battle, with 3 or 4 feeding from the same feeder(s) at a time until the male comes swooping in and tries to chase them all off. Then it's a free-for-all!! It's fun to watch them, and if I happen to be out by a feeder they buzz by close enough to feel the wind from their wings. I'm having to fill the back feeder daily, and the other 2 every 1-1/2 to 2 days. They're very entertaining to watch, to say the least!
    1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. I definitely do not want a limit on editing a post. I am bad about typos and I like to fix them when possible. I once misspelled The Bird Nuts name! Thankfully I was able to fix it. Also I am not all that jazzed about the post automatically showing an edit. In most cases it doesn't do anything for me to know that a post has been edited. In the past, the site admin could tell what had transpired in a post and that seems good enough.
    1 point
  34. Cattle egret Cattle Egret anahauc nwr 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  35. Orchard Oriole by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. This Red-eyed Vireo landed really close to me and didn't seem to notice me. This was only the second time I've seen a REVI at the house, the first time being only a few weeks ago. It took me longer to get a good shot of a REVI, than it did the WEVI :) This is from yesterday. REVI06302018 by Michelle Summers, on Flickr
    1 point
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