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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/18/2018 in all areas

  1. Not the best picture, but definitely the coolest bird I've seen in a while. And a lifer!
    6 points
  2. Blackburnian Warbler - Minnesota
    3 points
  3. While it's always difficult to say for sure, I'm not sure there's enough here to say it's a hybrid. The wingbars look right for a young Blue-winged in terms of extent and shape. Everything else fits Blue-winged, and both Sibley and Pyle indicate that young female Blue-winged can show yellowish wingbars. The green on the crown suggests that this is a HY female.
    3 points
  4. 229. Sooty Grouse IMG_8097 by Jim Joe, on Flickr 230. Black-backed Woodpecker IMG_6556 by Jim Joe, on Flickr 231. Ferruginous Hawk IMG_8674 by Jim Joe, on Flickr 232. Long-eared Owl IMG_8755 by Jim Joe, on Flickr
    2 points
  5. Looks like a Blue-winged Warbler x Golden-winged Warbler hybrid to me. It has two yellow wingbars (indicating some Golden-winged ancestry) and it appears to have a dark eyeline.
    2 points
  6. I got lucky with this shot last winter. Male Downy and male Hairy on the same feeder at the same time. IMGB3125 by ruthcatrin, on Flickr For me the beak length is the biggest, and often easist, quick identifier. The size (when seen in person) also usually jumps at me, though size is harder to tell in a photo usually.
    2 points
  7. Eye color only works for adults -- this time of year, youngsters all have dark eyes. Pyle (intended for use in-hand) states that some juveniles in late summer/early fall may not be identifiable at all.
    1 point
  8. I think #1 is a juvenile Savannah. Agree with White-crowned for the last two.
    1 point
  9. 2 and 3 are immature white-crowned sparrows, pass on 1
    1 point
  10. 1 point
  11. Yes, eye color is definitely a clue, but I'm not sure we can discern that with 100% confidence from these photos.
    1 point
  12. Given your location, this is an extremely difficult call -- both Glossy and White-faced are in that area, and in this plumage they're nearly impossible to distinguish.
    1 point
  13. Looks like a 2nd-year Swainson's Hawk.
    1 point
  14. Looks like a Horned Grebe to me.
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. My thoughts are mallard and juvenile yellow-crowned night heron...
    1 point
  17. Not sure about the duck (Blue-winged teal?), but the second is a juvenile night heron, I think. Possibly yellow-crowned with that blunt, heavy bill.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. Warbling Vireo, actually.
    1 point
  20. Your Red-wings haven't migrated, in fact a lot of them winter in Arkansas. What happens this time of year is they move away from their breeding locations and gather in large flocks, typically in roosts close to feeding areas.
    1 point
  21. Young Red-bellied Woodpecker, actually. Hairy Woodpeckers have a lot more black on the back, wings, and head, even when they're young.
    1 point
  22. 237: Red-breasted Sapsucker Red-breasted Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus ruber) by A S, on Flickr 238: Hairy Woodpecker Hairy Woodpecker (Leuconotopicus villosus) by A S, on Flickr 239: Black Oystercatcher Black Oystercatcher (Haematopus bachmani) by A S, on Flickr 240: Ruddy Turnstone (yes, there's a Black in the background, but IMO photos should feature their subject) Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres) by A S, on Flickr 241: Snow Bunting (it's actually a video, but the thumbnail is decent) Snow Bunting (for record) by A S, on Flickr
    1 point
  23. 233: Parasitic Jaeger Parasitic Jaeger by Greg Miller, on Flickr 234: Long-tailed Jaeger Juvenile Long-tailed Jaeger by Greg Miller, on Flickr 235: Glaucous Gull Adult Glaucous Gull by Greg Miller, on Flickr 236: Black Tern Black Tern by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  24. Looks like an Orange-crowned Warbler.
    1 point
  25. I'd call it an Eastern Wood-Pewee based on the long primaries, peaked head shape, darker vest, and lack of eyerings.
    1 point
  26. Hello. Photos taken at Lakeview Park, Corpus Christi, TX on August 12. Thank you. _DSH4658pp by Andrew Lyall, on Flickr _DSH4659pp by Andrew Lyall, on Flickr
    1 point
  27. The streaking is probably juvenile plumage, actually.
    1 point
  28. If the first word that comes to your mind is "cute", it's a Downy. 🙂
    1 point
  29. Another mark for Hairy is the black "shoulder spur" that you can see coming forwards from the neck in that later shot. Two other issues with the tail spots: first, sometimes, you're not seeing the outermost tail feathers and the next pair or two in show less black than the outermost ones. Second, at least in some parts of the country Hairy can occasionally show a few black spots there.
    1 point
  30. BBC Here's a Hairy Woodpecker I took a number of years ago in Suburban Chicago, Illinois.They are much bigger then a Downy, also the bill is much longer. Hope this helps. Hairy Woodpecker (male) by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  31. Crayfish Toss by hbvol50, on Flickr Just about to eat by hbvol50, on Flickr Down it goes! by hbvol50, on Flickr
    1 point
  32. Not sure why the app suggests Ruby-throated. Black-chinned female/immatures are almost identical, and would be much more likely based on range.
    1 point
  33. I watched in amazement as this BCNH caught this big fish (I think called a "Sunny"), held it for a minute or so until it stopped moving & swallowed it in 1 gulp. Black-crowned Night-Heron by Johnny, on Flickr Black-crowned Night-Heron by Johnny, on Flickr Black-crowned Night-Heron by Johnny, on Flickr Black-crowned Night-Heron - Happy Heron by Johnny, on Flickr
    1 point
  34. Brown Pelican Anahauc NWR 7-18 --Brown Pelican Anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
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