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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/19/2018 in all areas

  1. Sora at Nayanquing pt in East Central Michigan
    4 points
  2. Blackburnian Warbler - Minnesota
    4 points
  3. New bird to Charlotte, NC backyard today. I'm guessing blue gray gray gnatcatcher because of the birds color and the white around its eye. Can you confirm? Thanks!
    2 points
  4. I got lucky with this shot last winter. Male Downy and male Hairy on the same feeder at the same time. IMGB3125 by ruthcatrin, on Flickr For me the beak length is the biggest, and often easist, quick identifier. The size (when seen in person) also usually jumps at me, though size is harder to tell in a photo usually.
    2 points
  5. If the first word that comes to your mind is "cute", it's a Downy. šŸ™‚
    2 points
  6. Great blue heron taking off after being pestered by some terns. 0C3A8717-4 by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    2 points
  7. Osprey being cooperative and hunting my side of the shoreline. 0C3A0863 by lonestranger102, on Flickr 0C3A0847 by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    2 points
  8. Hi there, a few more... 1. Black-crowned Night Heron? NIght Heron for ID by Morganirich, on Flickr 2. Least Sandpiper? Least Sandpiper for ID by Morganirich, on Flickr 3. Dragonfly for ID anyone? Dragonfly for ID by Morganirich, on Flickr 4. Carolina Chickadee (v Black-capped?0 Carolina Chickadee by Morganirich, on Flickr 5. Tern - Forster's or Roseate? Tern for ID - Roseate or Forsters? by Morganirich, on Flickr 6. Least Tern? Tern for ID - Least? by Morganirich, on Flickr 7. Forster's? Tern for ID - Least - Forster's? by Morganirich, on Flickr 8. Forster's? Tern for ID - Forster's? by Morganirich, on Flickr 9. Common Tern? Tern for ID - Common? by Morganirich, on Flickr 10. Caspian Tern Tern for ID - Caspian by Morganirich, on Flickr thx all!
    1 point
  9. With buteos, always look at the tail pattern if you can -- I think they use them as a distant species-recognition signal. It's harder in juveniles, but in adults they're diagnostic. (It's a bit harder with a couple of the western species, Gray and Swainson's, but Gray is quite local and the two look quite different otherwise.)
    1 point
  10. Cliff Swallow.
    1 point
  11. Mt Rainier is a special place for most of us Washington locals. Hikes around the mountain can be a challenge but the views are spectacular.
    1 point
  12. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47909046 https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47909046 Checklists from the past few days.... Also school starts tomorrow for me šŸ˜„
    1 point
  13. #4 looks like a Tree Swallow in bad light -- as Blackburnian states, the forked tail doesn't work for a Chimney Swift.
    1 point
  14. Hmmm, Iā€™m not sure about Chimney Swift for 4 with that forked tail. Looks more like a swallow to me.
    1 point
  15. taken today near Houston
    1 point
  16. House Finch for the first two, then Downy Woodpecker.
    1 point
  17. The streaking is probably juvenile plumage, actually.
    1 point
  18. That's true for females, but males are free anyway--they don't help with the young. And even females with flightless ducklings are surprisingly mobile. They typically nest over a kilometer from the bodies of water where they raise their young. The longest move mentioned in Birds of North American Online (subscription required) was 9.2 km within two days of nesting for a female and young in S. Dakota. The two or three times I've seen woodlings (I just made that up), they left the pond they were in, and I couldn't find them again.
    1 point
  19. Yes, a young Broad-winged.
    1 point
  20. Another mark for Hairy is the black "shoulder spur" that you can see coming forwards from the neck in that later shot. Two other issues with the tail spots: first, sometimes, you're not seeing the outermost tail feathers and the next pair or two in show less black than the outermost ones. Second, at least in some parts of the country Hairy can occasionally show a few black spots there.
    1 point
  21. BBC Here's a Hairy Woodpecker I took a number of years ago in Suburban Chicago, Illinois.They are much bigger then a Downy, also the bill is much longer. Hope this helps. Hairy Woodpecker (male) by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  22. I would advise being a little more cautious about using the presence/absence of black on the outer tail feathers as a definitive field mark. Some Downy Woodpeckers show quite a bit of black, while others have little to even none. A quick Google Images search on DOWO will bring up a number of Downies that almost completely lack any black spots. It's a subtle clue, but not definitive- I'd argue that it's not that useful of a field mark, especially considering the fact that lightning can also have an impact on what is or isn't visible on a bird. Other field marks such as bill length and overall structure are much better ways of identifying DOWO and HAWO in my opinion.
    1 point
  23. Amazing they can fly after one or two of these isn't it ?
    1 point
  24. If they make enough noise and are in the right place at the right time, a healthy meal is delivered on the fly without even a touchdown !
    1 point
  25. Bald Eagle - Alaska
    1 point
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