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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/20/2018 in all areas

  1. mississippi kite fledgling snacking on a cicada
    3 points
  2. Yes, a young Broad-wing.
    2 points
  3. Cormorant On Sign Anahauc NWR 7-18 Cormorant On Sign Anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  4. Very cool Charlie! This one didn't stay long. I was lucky to get the pics that I did. He hopped around a bit and then was gone. I am having a great time identifying birds. It's been almost a year now and the gnatcatcher was bird #25. 🙂
    2 points
  5. Canadian Geese Ft Worth Nature Center 8-18 Canadian Geese Ft Worth Nature Center 8-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  6. Sora at Nayanquing pt in East Central Michigan
    2 points
  7. It could be an Alder -- they should be migrating right now. But ID'ing them by sight is virtually impossible.
    1 point
  8. Broad-winged Hawk, right? Seen in Vermont a few days ago.
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Flycatcher on the first bird. Maybe an eastern wood Pewee. Yes on the Summer Tanager. Edit: Sniped by tsegarra
    1 point
  11. Second one looks good for Summer Tanager. The first one doesn't look like a gnatcatcher though -- probably a flycatcher. Maybe Eastern Wood-Pewee?
    1 point
  12. Looks like an immature Dickcissel.
    1 point
  13. 1 a) Worn adult Semipalmated Sandpipers 1 b photo 1) Worn adult SESA again 1 b photo 2) Fresh juvenile SESA 1 c) Looks like a White-rumped in the front and a Semi in the back 2) Least Sandpiper- rich brownish coloring 3) Leaning towards Least 4) Yes, Stilt. The dowitcher looks like a good candidate for Long-billed, but we'd need better photos of the tertials to confirm 5) I'd be comfortable calling that a LB. Bird in the front is probably a hendersoni Short-billed. Just a note- size isn't usually very helpful in identifying Dows- shape/structure is much more useful 6) Yes, SAND 7) Yes, Gadwall
    1 point
  14. 2 Looks good for Least. Pass on 1.
    1 point
  15. I'm leaning Long-billed, but I'm not sure we can tell with 100% certainty from these pics.
    1 point
  16. That's typical of the species. Mine was cooperative enough for me to get a great ID. He spent about a full minute dust bathing about 10 feet from the window. He (or she) was flopped on his belly with tail and wings spread so I could clearly make out the white outer tail feathers, eye ring, and black bill and legs. He hopped around in the trees for a few minutes, giving me plenty of chance to see the white underparts. Unfortunately, by the time I went after the camera, he'd cleared out. I"m going to have to get a second camera to leave with the binos on the kitchen window ledge!
    1 point
  17. Hmmm🤔 . Let's just fix that and move on... EDIT: I have it down as 4 hours but I think you saw my party of 2 thing.
    1 point
  18. Looks like a Pine Warbler. The beak's too thin and pink for a vireo.
    1 point
  19. The second looks like a Northern Parula. Yellow-throated Vireos have thicker, darker beaks and lack the faint streaking on the breast as well as the blue tones in the face. I think you're correct on the first bird.
    1 point
  20. Taken today at mammoth caves in Kentucky Eastern wood pewee Yellow throated vireo
    1 point
  21. I was in Lansing for a few days for a wedding. Only got to bird one morning and when I saw there were still snowys in the area I knew I had to take my aunt to find one. The rails were a nice bonus.
    1 point
  22. Great, thank you. Looks like the eBird reviewers agree as well. Thanks again!
    1 point
  23. With buteos, always look at the tail pattern if you can -- I think they use them as a distant species-recognition signal. It's harder in juveniles, but in adults they're diagnostic. (It's a bit harder with a couple of the western species, Gray and Swainson's, but Gray is quite local and the two look quite different otherwise.)
    1 point
  24. Coincidentally, I had my third-ever Blue-Gray this afternoon, just south in Lexington, SC.
    1 point
  25. @ruthcatrin, what's really great about your photo is the presence of the familiar suet cage. That makes a great reference for size comparisons.
    1 point
  26. I noticed the same thing in my yard. Over the last week they have begun to appear again, but in smaller numbers
    1 point
  27. Mt Rainier is a special place for most of us Washington locals. Hikes around the mountain can be a challenge but the views are spectacular.
    1 point
  28. Blackburnian Warbler - Minnesota
    1 point
  29. Not the best picture, but definitely the coolest bird I've seen in a while. And a lifer!
    1 point
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