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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/21/2018 in all areas

  1. mississippi kite fledgling snacking on a cicada
    7 points
  2. I do a lot of hiking and I don't usually have a camera that I can take bird pictures with - so plan "B". I love to see various critters I pretty sure most of us do! I think this marmot was smiling for me!
    3 points
  3. Lifer Blue Jay in Austin,TX. Blue Jay by Jason, on Flickr
    2 points
  4. This is a Yellow Warbler. The extensive bright yellow in the tail is diagnostic for them. The bill is only deep black in adults -- juveniles start out with pale bills and they take a while to darken. The eye-ring is actually correct for Yellow, it's just that in adult males it's bright yellow on bright yellow. On younger birds, the eye-ring is still bright yellow but the face will show gray or olive tones, so that you see the eye-ring.
    2 points
  5. What does a bear do?
    2 points
  6. Not usually my style but for some reason I couldn't help myself with this one..
    1 point
  7. Given the plant it's sitting on, Hooded Oriole looks right. The bill shape fits, the long tail fits, and the overall color fits a young female.
    1 point
  8. Yeah we drove a lot on the highway back and forth. The Rest area is on the 80 mph highway and the nearest exits are several miles away in either direction. So to get from one side of the rest area to the other it's a good 10 minute drive. And then we had to go off another exit to get up in the Stone Hills which was quite a ways on gravel roads. So yeah we drove a lot 😛
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. I’ve lived here for 20 years, I can’t recall ever seeing them before. They were Startling Starlings. Large numbers and extremely loud.
    1 point
  11. Feral is an interesting term -- it's supposed to refer to domestic species that have returned to the wild. But with pigeons, there's basically no way to make the distinction, in part because domestic birds keep escaping into the wild, keeping the gene pools well-mixed. (For that matter, even if there truly are wild-type Rock Pigeons left in the world, there are enough feral birds that closely resemble them that you could never detect the wild-type ones anywhere away from their normal ranges.)
    1 point
  12. Observed on 8/20/18 in Pinole, California (near San Francisco). I can't decide on this one. Thanks in advance, Jack
    1 point
  13. Cassin's has a darker head that contrasts with the white cheek and chin, lacks the white edges on the outer tail feathers (this time of year, they can be worn off on Western), and has a vague pale tip to the tail. There are also some rather subtle differences in the back and wings.
    1 point
  14. Cormorant On Sign Anahauc NWR 7-18 Cormorant On Sign Anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  15. Canadian Geese Ft Worth Nature Center 8-18 Canadian Geese Ft Worth Nature Center 8-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  16. 😥 I'm sorry! Horse camps start tomorrow for me! One week, first time. Just curious, how did you go 100 miles in 2 hours?
    1 point
  17. Hmmm, I’m not sure about Chimney Swift for 4 with that forked tail. Looks more like a swallow to me.
    1 point
  18. I got lucky with this shot last winter. Male Downy and male Hairy on the same feeder at the same time. IMGB3125 by ruthcatrin, on Flickr For me the beak length is the biggest, and often easist, quick identifier. The size (when seen in person) also usually jumps at me, though size is harder to tell in a photo usually.
    1 point
  19. I agree with your thanks to Charlie and that sounds are important. I'd definitely add something, maybe after the "What did the bird look like?" section Or What did the bird sound like? If you can, make a sound recording or a video with sound of the bird and upload it to an external site. If you heard sounds the bird made but didn't record them, describing them can help. You can imitate sounds with words or nonsense words ("wit wit tew tew tew") or describe them musically. How long did calls or songs last and how much time was there between them? The tone is as important as the tune. Did you hear whistles, chirps, trills, buzzes, squawks, coos? Did the sound remind you of another bird, or of any musical instrument or other familiar sound? I didn't follow the earlier discussion, so I apologize if the following has been suggested already. In the "What did the bird look like?" section, I'd change the first "photos" to "photos or videos". At the end of the "Please limit" paragraph, I'd add, "If you have more than photo, please indicate clearly whether photos are of the same bird or whether you're not sure. Good ways are to number the photos (for example, "1, 2, and 3 are one bird, and 4 and 5 are another") or number the birds (for example, "1. [three photos here] 2. [two photos here])." I'd also add, "Don't stop looking for answers when you've gotten one. Sometimes someone will improve the first answer or correct it--everybody makes mistakes once in a while. Or people will agree with the first answer, which makes you more confident."
    1 point
  20. I think Cave Swallow is right, but I'm not sure I can rule out Cliff Swallow from these shots.
    1 point
  21. I live in Sacramento, so I see quite a few of these each year. I failed to point out some of the marks I use to distinguish Swainson's from Red-tailed. On a Red-tailed the breast is usually lighter with a dark belly, whereas yours has a dark breast and lighter belly. The head pattern is diagnostic also. Yours shows white between the eyes and a whitish throat, which is typical of Swainson's. Having said that, Red-tailed, being the most variable of all the Hawks, can show similar facial features at times, but Red-tailed will show (usually!!) more white in their wings. There have been times when I haven't been sure either and have posted a photo on here for ID. I think Red-tailed Hawks just love to confuse us!!
    1 point
  22. Bumpity-bump, ... bump, ... bump.
    1 point
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