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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/23/2018 in all areas

  1. Little Blue Heron (Juv.) Little Blue Heron (Juv.) by Johnny, on Flickr Little Blue Heron (Juv.) by Johnny, on Flickr
    6 points
  2. Three that may have been on the old forum: Northern Parula, Prothonotary Warbler, and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.
    6 points
  3. 5 points
  4. The wing shape is definitely useful - it's only got 4 fingers per wing, for instance. But he's in a turn -- you can see that the wings are slightly angled compared to the body, and the wingtips are spread rather than slightly tucked the way they are in a glide. A Broadie in a glide has wings shaped almost like paring knives - a gentle curve in front leading to a nearly pointed tip and a very straight trailing edge.
    3 points
  5. "House Wren and the Tattered Tails" is a great name for a garage band.
    3 points
  6. Assuming this was in Ontario, this would be a young Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. Note the large white patch along the front edge of the wing.
    2 points
  7. #3 looks like a Marsh Wren, with no streaks on the crown.
    1 point
  8. Looks better for juvenile Song or Swamp.
    1 point
  9. I'm guessing it's to keep the squirrels out. If I let them, my squirrels will open the cage up and take the whole cake out.
    1 point
  10. Saw this beauty with its mate nearby in the Sacramento Valley today. Just not sure of the specific hawk species. Help is much appreciated!
    1 point
  11. I see absolutely nothing here that point’s to Wilson’s. The head does look Grey to me plus that eye ring looks pretty normal, in my experience, for Nashville. Other shots could help clarify.
    1 point
  12. 1 point
  13. My first day out with a new lens. It certainly isnt great for cloudy days, but I was glad to capture this pair of, "Northern flickers".
    1 point
  14. Lifer Blue Jay in Austin,TX. Blue Jay by Jason, on Flickr
    1 point
  15. This is a Yellow Warbler. The extensive bright yellow in the tail is diagnostic for them. The bill is only deep black in adults -- juveniles start out with pale bills and they take a while to darken. The eye-ring is actually correct for Yellow, it's just that in adult males it's bright yellow on bright yellow. On younger birds, the eye-ring is still bright yellow but the face will show gray or olive tones, so that you see the eye-ring.
    1 point
  16. What does a bear do?
    1 point
  17. mississippi kite fledgling snacking on a cicada
    1 point
  18. I agree, looks like a Cooper's. Gos have coarser streaking below that typically extends all the way to the undertail coverts. The uneven tail bands don't really work too well from below -- the outer pair of tail feathers don't seem to follow the same pattern as the rest. The white patches you see are on the scapulars, and Coops and Sharpies both frequently show white patches there at this age. On Gos, you want to look for pale buff spots on the wing coverts, below those scapulars.
    1 point
  19. seems like a Cooper's Hawk
    1 point
  20. Cormorant On Sign Anahauc NWR 7-18 Cormorant On Sign Anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  21. Great minds think alike!! 😁
    1 point
  22. Great blue heron taking off after being pestered by some terns. 0C3A8717-4 by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    1 point
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