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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/31/2018 in all areas

  1. Great Kiskadee by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    3 points
  2. Green Heron Green Heron by Johnny, on Flickr Little Blue Heron (Juv.) Little Blue Heron by Johnny, on Flickr
    3 points
  3. Thank you psweet for the id Charlie, a great bird indeed! I had seen a nightjar flying around the area a few times over the past 3 days, but when I went out to change the hummer feeder, I was surprised to see it resting in one of my trees. That made my day 3 hours later and it is still in the same tree, so I took a few more pics: nighthawk by Andrew Lyall, on Flickr nighthawk by Andrew Lyall, on Flickr
    2 points
  4. Hawks and Falcons are hard for me, especially since almost everything I see is a Red-Tailed. Spotted these last week in or near Salt Creek Wildlife Refuge, near Tremonton Ut. last Saturday and Monday. I would appreciate verifying me IDs on these. I'm calling the first three photos a Ferruginous Hawk, the next two a Prairie Falcon, and the next one a Dark Morph Swainson's and then a more normal Swainson's. There were all kinds of raptors there those two days including several Northern Harriers and some very cute Burrowing Owls. Thanks in advance
    1 point
  5. I agree with Snowy. Congrats on the lifers!
    1 point
  6. It's Spizella time! Gary, for more fun with sparrows, I imagine Clay-colored Sparrows are migrating through your area these days too. Dan, Brewer's would be very unlikely in NC, I believe. Several sparrow species have those dark malar stripes. One where they're especially noticeable that has a long tail is Song Sparrow, though I'd expect that to have darker streaks than the Brewer's in these pictures. But Song Sparrows are very variable, and I've been wrong before.
    1 point
  7. 1 point
  8. The easiest way to distinguish Hawks versus Falcons is to determine if it's playing basketball or football. I'll take my Atlanta-based sports humor and be on my way now.
    1 point
  9. I think it is just dropping from one place to another.
    1 point
  10. Tropical Kingbird by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  11. Looks like a pelagic cormorant to me. With the the very thin bill.
    1 point
  12. Just a follow up for what it may be worth: I reached out to two people outside of the forum. Both said these are Forster's. Just to be on the safe side, I submitted bird 1 as Forster's based on light primaries, lack of carpal bar, and bill color that leans toward the yellow end of the spectrum. Bird number 2 is probably a Forster's for the same reasons but I submitted it as Common/Forster's. Both have been confirmed on that basis.
    1 point
  13. I'll second #1 and #4. What rules out White-Winged Dove for #5? I can't find any reliable photos of one from that angle, and the only WWDOs I've seen live were perched. Thanks.
    1 point
  14. I have no idea if the software allows for that, but it would be fine with me.
    1 point
  15. Hello. Photo taken today at my home in Corpus Christi, TX. Is this a Common or a Lesser? Thank you. nighthawk by Andrew Lyall, on Flickr
    1 point
  16. IMO, I agree with @GigiC. I think there should be not limit and/or have a larger amount. Or have a carry over system. So if I react to 5 today, the leftover say, 10 get carried over to tomorrow. Thoughts, @Aveschapines?
    1 point
  17. Agree with Blue-winged. Green-winged have shorter bills and a distinct creamy white line below the tail.
    1 point
  18. If that's the top end of a 2" x 4" that he's perched on, that's relatively spacious. I've see them jam themselves in to smaller areas. My parents have roll-up blinds for their patio, and of course they roll up unevenly. CAWRs regularly tuck themselves into concavity at one end of the roll.
    1 point
  19. 283. Rock Wren Rock Wren by Greg Miller, on Flickr 284. House Wren House Wren by Greg Miller, on Flickr 285.Winter Wren Winter Wren by Greg Miller, on Flickr 286. Marsh Wren Marsh Wren - Mill Creek Point - Secaucus, NJ - May 2012 by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  20. Carolina Wrens are known for roosting in the corners of buildings with their back feathers puffed out like this. Remember to include location so we can rule out other species.
    1 point
  21. Today, McCormick County, SC. I cant seem to get a handle on this guy. I lightened the second photo. Thanks.
    1 point
  22. 1 point
  23. Prairie Warbler, I'd say.
    1 point
  24. Ebony Jewelwing Ebony Jewelwing by Greg Miller, on Flickr Painted Lady Painted Lady - Lake Paulinskill, Stillwater, NJ by Greg Miller, on Flickr Unknown Fly Species Unknown Fly Species by Greg Miller, on Flickr Spicebush Swallowtail Spicebush Swallowtail by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  25. Bell's in Missouri should be more contrasty than this, with a darker face and white concentrated around the eyes. They also have a wingbar, although it might be worn off by now. Warbling vary in the amount of yellow below, especially the ones that have started their pre-basic molt.
    1 point
  26. Looks like a Warbling Vireo. Also, I’ve been to Riverlands many times. An absolutely great birding location. I saw my first Yellow-billed Cuckoo and Dickcissel there.
    1 point
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