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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/01/2018 in Posts

  1. Young male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.
    3 points
  2. I agree on both. I've heard that the sound that the AMGO is making is a fledgling call.
    3 points
  3. Rare for New Jersey - White Ibis Adult White Ibis by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    3 points
  4. Juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron.
    3 points
  5. Tropical Kingbird by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    3 points
  6. Day 6. We met our guide for the next two weeks, Rene Santos of Calyptura Expeditions, at 6am at our hotel. After a long drive, we finally reached our destination, Intervales State Park, perhaps the best birding site in the Atlantic Forest. We'd stay here two nights, and I couldn't be more excited. Even the entrance road was productive, producing a pair of Red-legged Seriemas, a flyover Buff-necked Ibis, and Double-collared Seedeater and Long-tailed Tyrants on the fencelines. Once we got there and checked in at the excellent Pousada Pau Pica it was just about lunch time, but we couldn't resist a little bit of birding. Rene got them to put some new bananas in the feeders, and we were soon beset by tanagers. Olive-green Tanagers were the most common, but good numbers of Red-necked, Green-headed, Black-goggled, Azure-shouldered, Diademed, and Ruby-crowned all made appearances. Green-winged Saltators and Golden-winged Caciques also made occasional forays to the feeder, while Rufous-crowned Sparrow, Plumbeous Pigeon and a single Sharpbill (we only saw two the entire trip) fed in the trees nearby. A single Violet-capped Woodnymph (the first of many) visited the hummingbird feeder. After lunch the others took a short nap, but I wandered off on my own down the path deeper into the forest. A small mixed flock turned up more new species, including Whiskered Flycatcher, Buff-browed Foliage Gleaner, Dusky-tailed Antbird, Hangnest Tody-Tyrant, Rufous-crowned Greenlet and Lesser Woodcreeper. A pair of Wattled Jacana on the pond nearby were also new, as was a Campo Flicker on the lawn. Around 3, we met back up with the guide and he took us deeper into the forest. It's amazing how much more you can see with a guide. Even covering the same exact ground that I had alone, we quickly turned up more lifers. A small flock of Brassy-breasted Tanagers (the only ones of the trip) flew in, distracting me from the skulking Pallid Spinetail that I was supposed to be looking at. A Slaty-breasted Wood-Rail ran across the trail. A Surucua Trogon showed itself nicely, while a Red-breasted Toucan flew off as soon as we spotted it, and a small flock of Scaly-headed Parrots screamed by overhead. Giant and Variable Antshrikes were heard only (we eventually would see Variable, but never could lay eyes on Giant), while Bertoni's and Squamate Antbird eventually showed themselves. We worked hard for good views of an Araucaria Tit-Spinetail way up in the top of an Araucaria tree. The guide called out new birds by ear faster than I could even point my binos in the right direction, but I eventually got at least halfway decent looks at Plain-winged Woodcreeper, Rufous-capped Spinetail, Southern Beardless-Tyrannulet, Gray-hooded Flycatcher, Gray-capped Tyrannulet, Eared Pygmy-Tyrant (my favorite pygmy-tyrant), and White-throated Spadebill, but had to settle for a heard-only Greenish Schiffornis. Way too soon it was time to turn back as the light was failing, but not before we happened into a small troupe of Capuchin monkeys, thrashing their way through the canopy looking for food in the bromeliads. My first full day in the Atlantic Forest and I added 41 new species, bring me up to 97 new species so far. Some eBird checklists, with pictures: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47789226 https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47789220 Once I figure out a good format for uploading my videos, I'll include some of those too.
    2 points
  7. I like critters too.
    2 points
  8. The dark breast spot is not a reliable ID mark as some Song Sparrows lack the spot and other sparrow species can have it.
    2 points
  9. The easiest way to distinguish Hawks versus Falcons is to determine if it's playing basketball or football. I'll take my Atlanta-based sports humor and be on my way now.
    2 points
  10. Green Heron Green Heron by Johnny, on Flickr Little Blue Heron (Juv.) Little Blue Heron by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  11. I do a lot of hiking and I don't usually have a camera that I can take bird pictures with - so plan "B". I love to see various critters I pretty sure most of us do! I think this marmot was smiling for me!
    1 point
  12. I'm suggesting this for photos of birds that were especially fun or exciting for you, regardless of photo quality. You might want to say something about why that bird was special. I'm always happy to see a Common Black Hawk way up north here in EspaƱola, N.M. This was on June 24. Common Black Hawk by J Friedman, on Flickr
    1 point
  13. To add to Mark5's list: The Eastern Wood-Pewee looks to be a vireo of some sort (I think Warbling, but I'm not sure) and the White-eyed Vireo is another American Redstart.
    1 point
  14. The repetitive call throughout the video is an American Goldfinch.
    1 point
  15. All look except: Carolina wren is eastern towhee. kinglet is chestnut-sided warbler. Don't know about the eastern wood pee-wee. Townsend's warbler is Blackburnian warbler by range. No Townsend's in the east.
    1 point
  16. The two "smacks" near the end sound like a Northern Cardinal.
    1 point
  17. Given the pink legs, I'd go with Herring Gull. I think the beak of a young Herring Gull is generally all black, and the beak of a young Ring-billed would have a yellow tip. Disclaimer: I'm not much of an authority on gulls.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. Looks like s townsends to me. The facial features are to black for green.
    1 point
  20. Both Little Blue. 1 is an adult. 2 isn't a juvenile- note that the term juvenile refers to a plumage, not an age. I believe that a LBHE that is technically a juvenile would be all white. The term I would use here would be "immature" or "subadult', but "transitional" pretty much means the same thing in this case.
    1 point
  21. I think it's the old keepers' house that is haunted.
    1 point
  22. That's such a beautiful area! That lighthouse is supposed to be haunted!
    1 point
  23. I think that dark spot on the first bird is just displaced feathers showing the darker down feathers below. These both look like Black-chinned -- the hint of color on the underparts of the second one looks like a reflection off of the red feeder. Lucifer are really distinctive-looking, when you do spot one. (The most reliable spot I know of is the Ash Canyon B&B just south of Sierra Vista -- earlier in the month she suggests coming in an hour before sunset, if I remember correctly, but they're likely a bit easier by this point in the season.)
    1 point
  24. 1) Looks like a bright juvenile Semipalmated to me. Looks rather "compact" overall I'm not seeing a really long-winged appearance 2) This is a Least. Note compact-ish shape/ structure, more reddish brown coloring, and slightly downcurved bill. 3) I'm leaning Greater as well
    1 point
  25. Double-crested would have extensive orange facial skin both above the lores and below the eyes, extending back to a curve on the throat.
    1 point
  26. Oh, wow. That's a lifer. Thank you! Re-posting photo with correct name: Pelagic Cormorant by Mark Featherstone, on Flickr
    1 point
  27. I have the book "The Warbler Guide" in front of me. From the photos I'm seeing, it certainly seems like this could be the underside of a Townshend's, especially from the belly up to the tail. Since there is little black on the throat it would have to be a female or first-year.
    1 point
  28. Hello. Photo taken today at my home in Corpus Christi, TX. Is this a Common or a Lesser? Thank you. nighthawk by Andrew Lyall, on Flickr
    1 point
  29. Great Kiskadee by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  30. Heceta Head Light. Oregon Coast
    1 point
  31. 1 point
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