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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/03/2018 in all areas

  1. taken this morning in Louisiana.....bet he's thinking, "Man, 4 weeks ago I was a gorgeous blue bird but look at me now"!
    3 points
  2. Wow, that is a life bird for me. Never having seen one, I obviously have not seen one. Thanks so much for this confirmation akiley and Bird Nuts!!!
    2 points
  3. The empid in flight and the one you just posted are definetly Yellow-bellied. Note the overall greenish/yellow coloring, compact structure and shape, and most importantly the lack of contrast between the throat and the rest of the head.
    2 points
  4. Here's a mulie buck with a Meadowlark sitting on his head
    2 points
  5. Magnolia Magnolia 3a -- Magnolia Warbler; 3b (the flight shot) Empidonax, most likely Yellow-bellied Looks like the same bird as 3b Canada Warbler Blackburnian Warbler Bay-breasted Warbler Yes to Scarlet Tanager, but aging and sexing them at this time of year is complicated -- all of them will look green right now.
    2 points
  6. 2 points
  7. I'm awfully late to the picture, but this fella has been around for the past week or so. Maine is killing it on the rarities again this year, I don't know if that's something to be afraid of.
    1 point
  8. She said they’re visiting her feeder, so I don’t think Redstart would be likely.
    1 point
  9. Bird Nuts, I totally forgot about this, and the fact that you helped me with the ID. So not a lifer, but still a FOY. A rare bird for me, and one that I need to be a little more aware of, as you never know when one will show up. Thanks again. Mike
    1 point
  10. Pine Warbler is a rather rare vagrant to Colorado.
    1 point
  11. Nice catch - next time how about explaining why so I don't have to do the work? Yes, that's an Ovenbird -- the contrast between the face and the malar is too strong for a Swainson's.
    1 point
  12. I agree with psweet this time😉
    1 point
  13. Ruby-crowned Kinglet.
    1 point
  14. I agree with Yellow-bellied for the flycatcher as well.
    1 point
  15. Least and Yellow-bellied calls are similar.
    1 point
  16. Look like Northern Shovelers to me.
    1 point
  17. I don't think it's identifiable, but if I had to guess I'd say Mallard (with some photo distortion). Shape doesn't look right for a Canvasback.
    1 point
  18. In Maryland. Suet is a seed, mealworm and berry mix block with hot pepper in it to help deter the voracious squirrels living in the huge oak tree above. The hot pepper is why it looks orangey and kind of gross. :-/
    1 point
  19. Yeah, the squirrels kept opening up the suet feeders so I clipped on some keychains things I had lying around to try to keep them out. Seems to work.
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. I would lean towards Blue-winged. Cinnamon would have a "plainer" face and would be brighter overall.
    1 point
  22. I'm having trouble seeing it as a Yellow. Maybe an Orange-crowned of the brighter Western subspecies?
    1 point
  23. Not much of a picture, but you asked... Code 5: Rufous-necked Wood-Rail
    1 point
  24. I agree with psweet, and you have some great shots!
    1 point
  25. Yes, looks like an American Goldfinch
    1 point
  26. Some from this summer. Male Red Saddlebags by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr Wheel Bug by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr Male Sooty Dancer by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr I'm pleased to have gotten a Flame Skimmer with a background that wasn't green or brown. Male Flame Skimmer by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr Back to green and up to to date. Blue-eyed Darner by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr
    1 point
  27. We don't see a lot of Red-necked Phalaropes here in northern New Mexico. (This was actually last weekend, but I forgot this thread that I started.)
    1 point
  28. Looks like a Northern Waterthrush to me.
    1 point
  29. Just looked up Molting.... Blue Jays go through one complete molt a year in late summer. This molt usually proceeds in an orderly fashion so that you barely notice that it's going on. But Blue Jays (as well as Northern Cardinals) often experience a complete molt of their head and maybe even their neck feathers. Nothing is wrong with the bird and the feathers will grow back. But for a period of time until they feathers return, they do look rather odd.
    1 point
  30. We have marmots in New Mexico too. (By the way, @HamRHead, woodchucks are marmots.) Yellow-bellied Marmot by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr And ground squirrels. Queen of all she surveys by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr And more glamorous mammals, but I didn't get any pictures of the bear I saw a few weeks ago.
    1 point
  31. Tropical Kingbird by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  32. A photo that I took years ago, of a juvenile and adult engaged in a face off.
    1 point
  33. It takes a lot of patience and breath-holding 😛 It's taken me forever to get out of the habit of kinda talking over the microphone so it sounds like some creep whispering lmho
    1 point
  34. Wow, very nice shot!
    1 point
  35. The immature of both have a red cap that fades. There is a kinda reddish tinge to the Downy's head, so its not impossible that thats an immature bird with a fading cap. But here at least they won't lose that red cap till later in the season. So I'm leaning towards mature birds.
    1 point
  36. Yes, Downy on the left and Hairy on the right. Now you have a photo that you can refer to that shows the sizes of both compared to your feeder. 🙂
    1 point
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