Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/04/2018 in all areas

  1. I'm awfully late to the picture, but this fella has been around for the past week or so. Maine is killing it on the rarities again this year, I don't know if that's something to be afraid of.
    5 points
  2. Never know what you'll see when you're birding. Red Fox by Greg Miller, on Flickr Who is looking at who? by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    3 points
  3. Was it all yellow? If not, how about a Yellow-headed Blackbird?
    2 points
  4. We have marmots in New Mexico too. (By the way, @HamRHead, woodchucks are marmots.) Yellow-bellied Marmot by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr And ground squirrels. Queen of all she surveys by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr And more glamorous mammals, but I didn't get any pictures of the bear I saw a few weeks ago.
    2 points
  5. Since the forum came back I've been trying to think of what threads we had, this was one Fire on the north rim Grand Canyon Kiger Gorge Steens Mountain, Oregon
    1 point
  6. Is this a Cassin's Sparrow? NW New Mexico today. Thanks. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/km19hex1vap0kfs/AAAI4_KjPhlACMB8LNXU7Y1Ca?dl=0
    1 point
  7. My son's photo from yesterday--frog on a kayak paddle.
    1 point
  8. Yes, or maybe an escaped kazoo?
    1 point
  9. Here is an image of the Nu'upia Ponds WMA. Awesome birds here!
    1 point
  10. Are you sure it was yellow? Could it have orange? Rufous Hummingbirds should be down here by now
    1 point
  11. Incidental today, Augusta GA. Possibly two birds. Bird 1-5: This has me thinking Common with that dark primary wedge, although the bill looks black. Bird 6-10: Is there any chance this is the same bird as in 1-5? On a fairly large body of water I shot several sequences of what I thought was the same bird making passes. Upon looking at my photos I am wondering if there was a second bird. I definitely lost track of it several times so perhaps...
    1 point
  12. This is a classic Cooper's Hawk. Like you said, tail is too long for a Red-shouldered.
    1 point
  13. Another wild guess would be Peregrine Falcon.
    1 point
  14. I have no problem seeing the first as a Common. Lots of ours now have black bills. 1st summers. 2nd set looks likely to be a tern. I am not good enough to say more from those pictures.
    1 point
  15. Leg color is something to be careful of -- it can be obscured by mud, etc., and can be rather variable in youngsters. Don't know where you got the "eyebrow means semi" line -- that's simply wrong. In this case, the extensive rufous on the scaps and tawny-rufous on the wing coverts coupled with the nice, clean, crisp juvenile plumage say Least as well as the legs. Semi's lack extensive rufous above in this plumage, and Western have distinctly gray wing coverts.
    1 point
  16. They both look like Least to me.
    1 point
  17. this is fine. more people will see it here
    1 point
  18. with yellow-green legs, it's a least
    1 point
  19. Worn, faded feathers tend to have frayed edges and markings that are blurred, low-contrast, etc. Fresh feathers have crisply-defined edges, often with a bit of contrast, and clean, crisp, contrasty markings -- when you get the two together, the difference shows up nicely. Other diagnostic marks? The pink legs do help, although you have to be careful of leg color in youngsters -- a first-year bird especially can surprise you. Similarly, the bill pattern does fit a young Herring, although the structure is a better clue -- fairly heavy with a distinct gonydeal angle. Also, young Ring-billed should never be mottled on the undersides -- the breast and neck have very clean dark scaling, the belly tends to lose that pretty quickly and ends up white. The back in juveniles is well-marked, but even then it's very clean and regular, with dark centers and pale edges to the feathers, rather than the anchor-shapes you see here. A lot of ID'ing immature gulls, though (except for a few experts), comes down to elimination by range. Fact is, there are several European species, etc. that I couldn't possibly rule out here -- but they're very unlikely to be there, so I don't worry about it. Given the location and date, the other options are Great and Lesser Black-backed and Laughing. Laughing is quite different even as a juvenile. Great Black-backed should be overall bulkier, with a more checkered back pattern and a whiter head, and a heavier bill. Lesser is closer to this, but they shouldn't show so many warm tones in the plumage, and be a bit whiter on the head. Can't help you with the programming side of things -- I can understand the general idea of neural networking, but I couldn't explain it any better than we can understand how it happens in our own heads.
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. OK, thanks. I haven't been up to Colusa NWR since Spring. Just my luck!!
    1 point
  22. Great Kiskadee by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  23. Green Heron Green Heron by Johnny, on Flickr Little Blue Heron (Juv.) Little Blue Heron by Johnny, on Flickr
    1 point
  24. from before Tern Anahauc NWR 7-18 Tern Anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  25. Code 3: Fork-tailed Flycatcher Fork-tailed Flycatcher by Greg Miller, on Flickr Code 5: Whiskered Tern Whiskered Tern by Greg Miller, on Flickr Code 3: Curlew Sandpiper For ID - Curlew Sandpiper by Greg Miller, on Flickr Code 3: Common Greenshank For ID - Common Greenshank by Greg Miller, on Flickr Code 4: White-winged Tern Old Shot - White-winged Tern by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  26. Tufted Duck: Code 3 Tufted Duck - Parvin State Park by Greg Miller, on Flickr Barnacle Goose: Code 4 Barnacle Goose by Greg Miller, on Flickr Pink-footed Goose: Code 4 Pink-footed Goose by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  27. Northern Lapwing, Code 4 Statesboro, GA Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus)! by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Tufted Flycatcher, Code 4 Ramsey Canyon, AZ Tufted Flycatcher by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Carr Canyon, AZ Tufted Flycatcher by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Slate-throated Redstart: Code 4 Pinery Canyon, AZ Slate-throated Redstart by Liam Wolff, on Flickr IMG_8562 by Liam Wolff, on Flickr
    1 point
  28. Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl: Code 3 Cameron County, TX Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Aplomado Falcon: Code 3 Old Port Isabel Road, TX IMG_3940 by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Black-capped Gnatcatcher: Code 3 Madera Canyon, AZ Black-capped Gnatcatcher by Liam Wolff, on Flickr IMG_6473 by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Clay-colored Thrush: Code 3 Hidalgo, TX IMG_2488 by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Five-striped Sparrow: Code 3 California Gulch, AZ Five-striped Sparrow by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Rufous-capped Warbler: Code 3 Florida Canyon, AZ Rufous-capped Warbler by Liam Wolff, on Flickr Rufous-capped Warbler by Liam Wolff, on Flickr
    1 point
  29. Semi-landscape: West Maui Rainbow by Drew Beamer, on Flickr
    1 point
  30. My Dad birding by MerMaeve, on Flickr IMG_4925 by MerMaeve, on Flickr Paul Henry Trail by MerMaeve, on Flickr
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Scarlet Tanager from a couple of weeks ago.
    1 point
  33. Horrible light, but happy enough with this pic of lifer Louisiana Waterthrush. _91A9637 by chipperatl2, on Flickr
    1 point
  34. Juvy Yellow Crowned Night Heron
    1 point
  35. Brown-crested Flycatcher by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. Osprey chicks fighting it out for superiority, there is a third behind mom but its hidden cause he is the runt,I dont expect the runt to last much longer,the other two pic on it constantly
    1 point
  37. From a couple days ago - Mourning Dove carrying nesting material: And a Cedar Waxwing:
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...