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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/05/2018 in Posts

  1. My son's photo from yesterday--frog on a kayak paddle.
    3 points
  2. I agree it doesn't look like a Great-crested, with so little yellow below, but I think I want to see a bit more of the bill or wings before I say Phoebe for sure.
    2 points
  3. Agreed. A good field guide is usually the best way to go, in my opinion. Online searches bring the risk of having misidentified photos, general confusion of using Google Images, and usually take more effort! šŸ™‚
    2 points
  4. Agree with Clark's Nutcracker. Are you using a physical field guide? It is often much easier to find a bird in a field guide rather than searching on the internet.
    2 points
  5. Welcome to Whatbird! This is a Clark's Nutcracker. Gray body, thick beak, black wings and tail with white patches.
    2 points
  6. #3 may be, the others are clearly Downy's. Hairy don't have stout bills -- they have long bills. The barring on the outer tail feathers is tricky in photos -- most of the time you're only seeing a little bit of a couple of feathers, and you won't see any bars. Even if you are seeing the entire feather, it turns out that Downy's don't always have very much (little enough that you might not see it even in #3), and Hairy's occasionally show a small amount -- to the point that there is actually a bit of overlap.
    1 point
  7. I think 1, 3 and 4 are all Hairy's...there is not any barring/spots on the outside edge of the tail. The bill on the second one looks pretty stout to me...not as dainty and sharply pointed as a Downy's should look. šŸ™‚
    1 point
  8. Okay, if you're reading a size out of a field guide or on-line source, and it gives you one number -- laugh at it. Just like people aren't all 5'6", Downy Woodpeckers aren't all 6.5" -- those are averages, and there's variation around them. Pyle lists wing measurements as 84 - 115 mm, for instance, which is a fair bit of variation. Interestingly, he also lists overlap between Downy and Hairy in both wing and tail measurements, although that may be a geographic issue. (Large Downy in one place could overlap with small Hairy somewhere else, without ever showing an overlap at any one location.) The one measurement he doesn't show overlap with is the bill length, although even there they can come closer than field guides often make it look. Looking back at that third bird, I'm not quite as comfortable calling it as I was -- there isn't a shoulder spur which a Hairy should show, but the head and bill look a bit bigger than I was thinking.
    1 point
  9. Given the lighting in that first shot, I think aging this bird is premature. Agree with juvenile for the Spotty, though.
    1 point
  10. Iā€™m not, Iā€™m going to get one!
    1 point
  11. Blue Jay is my guess. They have sooo many different calls.
    1 point
  12. No shoulder spur, the bill looks a bit long but not what I'd consider Hairy size, and the bird next to him is a Pygmy Nuthatch, smaller than either a Red-breasted or a Brown-headed. Still looks good for Downy to me.
    1 point
  13. 1 point
  14. Looks like an Eastern Wood-Pewee.
    1 point
  15. Yes, this time of year Mourning Warblers can show that broken eye-ring. MacGillivray's will show it as well, but they'd be grayer on the throat, the eye-rings would be better defined (Mourning can show stronger eye-arcs than this, in fact), and you're too far east to expect MacGillivray's.
    1 point
  16. These all look like Downy. Hairy has a distinctly longer bill, and a spur of black extending forwards from the shoulder.
    1 point
  17. Looks like a female Mourning Warbler.
    1 point
  18. Thank you! I've identified six birds in one day after tons of research, but could not find this one anywhere! It was driving me crazy, haha.
    1 point
  19. Oddly enough, that's one of the reasons I'm in birding - to get over myself.
    1 point
  20. Thanks...almost changed my guess to juvenile bald but...Iā€™m a man and it hurts to admit Iā€™m wrong!!! šŸ¤·šŸ¼ā€ā™‚ļøšŸ¤¦šŸ¼ā€ā™‚ļøšŸ˜­šŸ˜‚
    1 point
  21. I agree that it's not a Harris' -- there's no rust on the shoulders, the white on the undertail coverts isn't well-defined, and as noted the underwing is wrong. But never rule out Harris' Hawk by range -- they're one of the most commonly kept falconer's birds, thanks to their cooperative hunting habits, and they can occasionally show up anywhere as a result. (I've watched one flying in Wisconsin -- to make things simpler, as soon as I figured out what he was, he flew to his owner's hand....)
    1 point
  22. 1 point
  23. Thanks to both Charlie Spencer and psweet. Lifer
    1 point
  24. Most definitely an Osprey.
    1 point
  25. Short primaries, prominent, teardrop-shaped eyering, muted green tones - Least Flycatcher.
    1 point
  26. (Bearcat6 already posted Marsh Wren.) 286. Gray Jay Gray Jay, Santa Fe Ski Basin by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr 287. Northern Saw-Whet Owl Northern Saw-whet Owl by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr 288. Neotropic Cormorant Neotropic Cormorant by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr 289. Least Sandpiper Least Sandpiper by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr
    1 point
  27. This is absolutely adorable!
    1 point
  28. Never know what you'll see when you're birding. Red Fox by Greg Miller, on Flickr Who is looking at who? by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron.
    1 point
  33. How about a seascape (kinda)
    1 point
  34. Charleston, Oregon
    1 point
  35. White River Falls in north central Oregon.
    1 point
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