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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/06/2018 in Posts

  1. I live in the Pacific Northwest, South-Central Washington state, this is what Downy and Hairy's bills look like here. Stout, adj: thick and strong. Sturdy. Perhaps I could have/should have chosen a different word but that is how I see it as compared to a Downy's bill. 🙂
    4 points
  2. Looks like a young Red-headed Woodpecker.
    2 points
  3. I wondered how you got the upside-down question marks!!??!!
    2 points
  4. Just a quick technical note- it's Steller's Jay, "er" not "ar".
    1 point
  5. The woodpecker in the third photo looks larger than the one in the others when I compare the size of the birds to the suet feeder. I'm just sayin'.
    1 point
  6. Thanks. I can see what you're saying about only one wing being injured, though it looks as if two wings are sticking up somehow. Maybe just different primaries?
    1 point
  7. Things are starting to move in my area (Costa Mesa/SoCal.) This last week I have seen some of the travelers that just stop for a bath or drink and keep going. I had a Black-throated Gray Warbler yesterday and a Wilson's juvenile today. I'm a fan of the Spotted Towhee. This one still has to grow some head feathers.
    1 point
  8. In a Word document hold Alt and type 0191. Then copy and paste. There are several other ways to get there: https://m.wikihow.com/Do-an-Upside-Down-Question-Mark
    1 point
  9. I agree with Yellow ?¿?¿? 😄 Some kind of warbler seems likely, and Yellow seems possible, but hard to tell. (I only laughed at the thread title, I swear!)
    1 point
  10. I'm not sure if I can contribute to the ID, but is Mourning within range for your location?
    1 point
  11. I think the thin, weak eye arcs and eyeline and the dull yellow color below fit Orange-crowned better.
    1 point
  12. Here is another link with some good information and a comparative photo of a Hairy and a Downy on a suet cake: https://www.thespruce.com/downy-or-hairy-woodpecker-387335
    1 point
  13. Day 9. Ubatuba. The lowland rainforest seem to be much dense than that what we experienced in Intervales, with lots more bamboo and a thicker understory. Our first stop was Fazenda Angelim, an old coffee farm that had been converted into a preserve. The species I was most excited about here was the diminutive Buff-throated Purpletuft, and I was not disappointed as we quickly found one perched out in the open (way up in the top of the canopy). I soon got distracted by the flood of new birds though, with a lek of White-bearded Manakins calling from in the nearby forest, a flyover Gray-rumped Swift and White-necked Hawk, a pair of Orange-eyed Thornbirds just hanging out in the open at the edge of the forest and a Crested Oropendola that stopped off briefly in a dead tree before continuing on into the forest. The feeders turned up the first Green Honeycreepers and Golden-chevroned Tanagers of the trip, and nearby we eventually tracked down a calling White-barred Piculet. Deeper into the forest we turned up a small mixed flock, and got Flame-crested Tanager, Pale-browed Treehunter and Black-capped Foliage-gleaner. A little side path led to a gorgeous stream, but our attempts at Riverbank Warbler and Sharp-tailed Streamcreeper were met with silence. All was not lost though, because a pair of Black-cheeked Gnateaters gave us great looks, though it was too dark for my camera to even focus properly on them. Continuing on that theme, we tracked down Yellow Tyrannulet, Eye-ringed Tody-Tyrant and Fork-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant deep in the bamboo thickets, and eventually enticed them to come out for good looks, but no pictures. Rufous-capped Antthrush would be even harder, offering brief glimpse as it skulked on the forest floor, though they were quite vocal. Next the guide led us up a steep trail behind the owners house, where we encountered the best mix flock of the trip. Ochre-breasted Foliage-gleaner, Pale-browed Treehunters, White-throated Woodcreeper and Lesser Woodcreeper, Red-crowned Ant-Tanager, Whiskered Flycatcher, another Buff-throated Purpletuft and a few species of Tanagers all streamed through the canopy over our heads. Our guide then heard a Bellbird calling at the top of the hill, so we raced up there to try to get a better look at it, but alas it wouldn't show itself. The view (once we caught our breath) was amazing though, and he explained that he hoped to be convince the owner to install a canopy tower at this site. There are a few recent unconfirmed records of Kinglet Calyptura from this site, a tiny canopy-dwelling species that was long though extinct until a pair was rediscovered outside Rio in 1996, then vanished again. Not surprisingly, we didn't see any, but our guide is sure that it's still out there somewhere. We did, however, have better luck with Yellow-fronted Woodpeckers, a small family group flew into the clearing and hung out on a dead snag for quite a while, allowing me to get some decent shots and video of them. Back down the hill, we went deeper into the dense tangle of bamboo. This site also hosted another incredibly rare species in the past, the Purple-winged Ground Dove, a bamboo specialist that's declined to near extinction. Alas, we didn't see that species either, and a missed a Ruddy Quail-Dove that the guide only heard in the distance. We did get great looks at a Reddish Hermit singing and displaying on its lek, which was a worthy consolation prize. The last new species for this site was a Bran-colored Flycatcher that we spotted on the way back to the car. Before we headed out, I wanted to try again to get some pictures of the White-bearded Manakins, as I wasn't able to get any in the early morning gloom before. By now they had stopped calling, so we never relocated any, but we did get some great looks at a pair of Spot-breasted Ant-Shrikes, which I got a short video of. By now we were getting hungry, so it was back to Ubatuba for lunch at a fish restaurant that our guide liked (he lives in Ubatuba) and then an afternoon siesta. Rested and recharged, it was off to Sitio Folha Seca, where someone had an amazing humingbird feeder setup. Over a dozen feeders attracted hundreds of hummingbirds, and we spent about 3 hours just taking it all in and trying to get good videos and pictures of them. Festive Coquette was by far the most common species, and they dominated the central feeders just by sheer numbers, despite being the tiniest hummingbirds present. Brazillain Ruby, Saw-billed Hermit and Violet-crowned Woodpnymphs were also quite common, and small numbers of Sombre Hummingbird, Glittering-throated Emerald and White-chinned Sapphire were also present. The fruit feeders also offered great looks a Violaceous Euphonia and Chestnut-bellied Euphonia, as well as more Green Honeycreepers, Blue Dacnis and Red-necked and Green-headed Tanagers. Alas, fading light and vicious biting flies eventually drove us to leave. So concluded our brief but productive visit to Ubatuba; we'd head back up into the mountains to Itatiaia first thing in the morning. eBird checklists, with photos: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47890152 https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47890154 I'll try to pick out the best hummingbird videos, tonight or tomorrow.
    1 point
  14. These photos are an excellent example of why black spots on the outer tail feathers (or lack thereof) is not a reliable field mark.
    1 point
  15. Again? I was just getting used to Gray Jay. (Okay, I was pretty used to it.) Thanks for the compliment and the correction!
    1 point
  16. This critter is on the bigger side...
    1 point
  17. This looks like a Lesser Yellowlegs to me. The overall back color and the face pattern aren't right for a Solitary, and the legs look yellow in the second shot.
    1 point
  18. Possibly solitary sandpiper, judging partly by the dark shoulders. Another possibility would be willet, but I don't think it is.
    1 point
  19. Juvenile chipping sparrow?
    1 point
  20. These all look like Bullock's.
    1 point
  21. This is indeed a young Herring Gull. Young gulls are complicated things to ID -- first thing you want to do is age the bird. In this case, there's quite a few worn feathers, and it looks like two generations of feathers on the back. (There are ones that look more worn and faded than the others.) Ring-billed are 3-year gulls (meaning that they only take 3 years to reach adult plumage), whereas Herring are 4-year gulls. That means that a Ring-billed's second set of feathers is going to be closer to adult-like than in a Herring Gull. In fact, with Ring-bills, their second set of feathers on the back come in their first fall (like right now) and they're gray just like adults. If you see a second set of feathers like this, still showing spots, it's not going to be a Ring-billed.
    1 point
  22. I think it's the old keepers' house that is haunted.
    1 point
  23. Not much more beautiful than a fledgling Barn Swallow
    1 point
  24. Mississippi Kite feeding fledgling a cicada
    1 point
  25. I looked up katydid on the computer and found a True Katydid that looks just like it.
    1 point
  26. Spirit Falls, Washington
    1 point
  27. Mt Hood Wildflowers, Oregon
    1 point
  28. Mossy Grotto Falls in the Columbia Gorge, Oregon
    1 point
  29. Late February of this year, had some perfect snow for this shot of White River and Mt Hood.
    1 point
  30. Bandon Beach, Oregon
    1 point
  31. Diamond Peak, Cascade Range, Oregon
    1 point
  32. Mt Hood reflecting on Trillium Lake
    1 point
  33. Hidden Falls near Mt Hood, Oregon
    1 point
  34. Sunrise earlier this year near Sandy, Oregon with Mt Hood in the distance.
    1 point
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