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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/07/2018 in Posts

  1. Green Heron Green Heron by Johnny, on Flickr
    5 points
  2. Scarlet Tanager by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    3 points
  3. Agree with northern flicker. The giveaways for me are the black spot on the breast, and that even though it's basically a woodpecker, I usually see them on the ground, eating ants and other bugs.
    3 points
  4. Long primary projection, dark vest, peaked head - Looks like a Western Wood-Pewee.
    2 points
  5. Or type a question in an on-line translation tool, copy the punctuation mark, and paste it in. I keep one in a buffer along with 'ñ', Señors y Señoras.
    2 points
  6. This is an immature Tennessee Warbler. Thank you for helping this little guy, I hope he's okay 🙂
    2 points
  7. Or buy a computer in a Spanish-speaking country; they are right there on the keyboard 😄
    2 points
  8. ¡¡¿¿Ññ á é í ó ú ü Á É Í Ó Ú Ü??!!
    1 point
  9. Like that? Here, have a couple of these: ¡! ¡! ¡!
    1 point
  10. Hee hee tricky! (Of course, I have an ñ on my keyboard too 😜)
    1 point
  11. Looks good for an Eastern kingbird to me. I think I can just make out the white tail tip.
    1 point
  12. Yes, looks like a Least, and a Semi.
    1 point
  13. I would agree with Lesser. Its back looks quite dark but it seems to be the bird's own shadow casting shade. Also the yellow legs would suggest Lesser.
    1 point
  14. 1 is a Magnolia Warbler and 2 is indeed a Chestnut-sided.
    1 point
  15. Thanks for overcoming your fears!
    1 point
  16. Any chance it's a common yellowthroat?
    1 point
  17. This is a domestic Graylag Goose. Techically in the genus Anser as you mentioned. Note the deep belly characteristic of many domestic waterfowl.
    1 point
  18. Agree with Northern Flicker.
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. It’s gonna be tough. The experts might be able to help, but generally you have to have one in your hand to tell the difference. I believe it’s by measuring the tail feathers?? Generally, if there is green on the back it’s more likely an allens (I believe roughly 5% of Rufous show green) and if it’s all Rufous with no green on the back it’s most likely a Rufous (I believe about 5% of Allens show all Rufous also 🤦🏼‍♂️) I would guess Allens for yours. when reading ing this post remember that 96% of all stats are made up. Or was it 75% 🤷🏼‍♂️🤪
    1 point
  21. I've got a large Elderberry shrub out back and when those berries ripen in mid/late August it's like the last hurrah for summer here. Lots of Robins, Mockingbirds, Catbirds, and Orioles until they strip the shrub bare; then they're gone. Right now I have a big patch of ripening sunflowers and other perennials that attracts the goldfinches non-stop. Today there was a pretty orange-ish cardinal that I haven't noticed before. Some grosbeaks would be awesome but very unlikely - have seen them only once, a pair of Rose-breasted, in the spring, years ago.... She's got a cool hairdo too..
    1 point
  22. I think the first two are Downies and the last two are Hairies.
    1 point
  23. The woodpecker in the third photo looks larger than the one in the others when I compare the size of the birds to the suet feeder. I'm just sayin'.
    1 point
  24. I tend to agree you lonestranger, that people who care about birds are also curious about other kinds of wildlife, and having easily accessible forums on them would make these whatbird forums more useful and fun. I looked at the links provided by a member at the end of this post:(https://www.insectidentification.org/, ttp://www.reptileknowledge.com/snakes/identification.php, https://www.fishbase.de/identification/classlist.php, https://naturalhistory.si.edu/mna/) and to me they are very uneven in quality. The one on mammals is very hard to use and none as are friendly and accessible as this forum. Regarding how popular these critter forums were, they had quite a few posts but I can't give you exact numbers right now because we lost all our data. So, unless people are really against this, I am going to add them in, but I will be cautious and keep it very simple so they don't clutter the site. If there is a lot of resistance lets put a poll together and see what the consensus is.
    1 point
  25. Sibley, if I remember right, noted later on that the "divided nape patch" mark is geographically variable, and that you need to know what the local situation is to use it.
    1 point
  26. i tend to agree..at least with the third image....Hairy the pictures of the bird are harder for me ...but when usually say that the Downy..in additon to being smaller and shorter bill...has a more prnounced "forehead" as the Hairy's is more sloping
    1 point
  27. https://youtu.be/y8mn5kFDucY I think I got it uploaded Might not even be a Ruby Throated.
    1 point
  28. I've got 5 hummingbird feeders up now, placed all over the front and back yard. Those Ruby Throated are very territorial I have learned in the past few weeks! I've got to get this video up that I have of one. The red in the throat is golden, and I read somewhere that it's an older male? I'm not sure if thats right or not.
    1 point
  29. Duck crossing requires caution. I am parked in front of the Little Gretel restaurant which features duck on the menu. Presumably the duck is free range and locally sourced!
    1 point
  30. Common Ringlet Common Ringlet by Greg Miller, on Flickr Little Wood Satyr Little Wood Satyr by Greg Miller, on Flickr American Snout American Snout by Greg Miller, on Flickr White M Hairstreak White M Hairstreak by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Tropical Kingbird by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  33. Excellent point, TBN.
    1 point
  34. Great Kiskadee by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  35. Pea-Turkey I Found it on Ebay.
    1 point
  36. Don't be judging me...It's not like you've never looked to see what's between your legs before. IMG_5298 by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    1 point
  37. Unspotted Looper-18.jpg by chipperatl2, on Flickr
    1 point
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