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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/09/2018 in all areas

  1. Sandwich Turn! A way to remember it is like it's bill is dipped in mustard. And you have mustard on a sandwich. @Bobg
    2 points
  2. photos taken in Lakewood, Colorado 9/8/18
    2 points
  3. 2 points
  4. Yellow-billed Cuckoo by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    2 points
  5. This is my first photo of a Red-eyed vireo.
    2 points
  6. Seen at Half Moon Bay just south of San Francisco today (8 Sept) hanging out with a bunch of Brewer's Blackbirds (the Starling, not me). I didn't realize how painfully ugly this poor thing was until I saw the photo at home. Looks like the skin around the face is completely denuded. Is this some transition between summer and winter plumage, or juvenile and winter plumage? Thanks. Ugly Starling by Mark Featherstone, on Flickr
    1 point
  7. Definitely Willet, but not in breeding plumage. Breeding plumage by late summer should be quite worn -- these feathers are brand new. These are still in juvenile plumage, with a few first-basic feathers on the upper wings and scaps. (Look for the clean, all-gray feathers with no scalloping or spotting.)
    1 point
  8. Seen at a beach in South Florida. Are these birds Greater Yellowlegs?
    1 point
  9. This time of year we pretty much have only Wood Ducks, BBWD, Mallards and Blue-winged Teals (although early migrants do show up, like that Ruddy Duck I had in Lincoln County last week). The apparent proportions of this bird rule out Blue-winged Teal which are smaller and stockier, the wing shape and pattern eliminates Wood Duck and BBWD. I'd say this is a Mallard, female or eclipse-plumaged male, which can show the strong contrast between the brown belly and pale under wings.
    1 point
  10. 1 point
  11. Ah, yes, thought the first two were the same bird.
    1 point
  12. Just to summarize: 1. Northern Parula 2. Magnolia Warbler 3-4. Tennessee Warbler
    1 point
  13. This is a Willet, still in breeding plumage. The thick bill here is one thing you could use to distinguish it from a yellowlegs.
    1 point
  14. Any other angles? My first impression was Tennessee.
    1 point
  15. 1. Yes, Northern Parula 2. Tennessee Warbler
    1 point
  16. Routine moulting. Notice the newer feathers that have already come in around the edges of the open area. Also notice the colors on the other feathers are still relatively well defined, and the edges of the feathers are still sharp and unworn. Great photo, by the way! The more I look at it, the more I appreciate it. Every time I look at it, I notice new details.
    1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. Looks like it to me!
    1 point
  19. I can't really answer your question but I do see one image in The Warbler Guide that shows the same mottled look.
    1 point
  20. Red-tailed Hawk. The band of streaks across the belly and the dark patagial bars are good ID marks.
    1 point
  21. I agree with IvoryBillHope.
    1 point
  22. That's a good name for him.
    1 point
  23. Found another heron with a snake. All the snakes I've seen them with around here are orange spotted garter snakes which are really pretty.
    1 point
  24. Scarlet Tanager by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  25. This critter is on the bigger side...
    1 point
  26. Here is an image of the Nu'upia Ponds WMA. Awesome birds here!
    1 point
  27. Heceta Head Light. Oregon Coast
    1 point
  28. Mt Rainier is a special place for most of us Washington locals. Hikes around the mountain can be a challenge but the views are spectacular.
    1 point
  29. Great Bay Blvd., Tuckerton, NJ Approaching Thunderstorm by Greg Miller, on Flickr Approaching Thunderstorm II by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  30. This is our beautiful Olympic National Park the local weather and fires have given them a different look
    1 point
  31. Big Horn mountains, Wyoming
    1 point
  32. White River Falls in north central Oregon.
    1 point
  33. Thanks, I hadn't noticed. But of course it's too late to edit.
    0 points
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