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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/10/2018 in Posts

  1. A bright male Saffron Finch Posed nicely!
    5 points
  2. Between the wing structure and the tail pattern, this is a Broad-winged. If you look closely at that first shot, you can see that all of the primaries are paler than the secondaries -- this is typical of some young Broad-wings (and all young Red-tails), whereas Red-shouldered only show part of the outer primaries as pale.
    3 points
  3. I think it's a Broad-winged (compact shape, four wing fingers, dark subterminal band on tail).
    2 points
  4. I'm not sure this is normal molt for a starling. Maybe it has a mite problem around the face.
    2 points
  5. Green Heron Green Heron by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  6. Great Black Hawk, Biddeford ME by Seth Davis, on Flickr If accepted, this will be the 2nd N. American Record, and obviously the first for Maine!
    1 point
  7. Hello... Since we have not had a post in a while I thought it was about time to mention the fall migration season that is about to start. They say Ruby-throats start moving south as early as the end of August so you may see some different hummers this month on their way back to Central America. My first "winter" species that show up around my house each year is the dark-eyed juncos. I"ve seen them as early as late October before with big numbers coming in November and December. I get a lot more American Goldfinches and white-throated sparrows in November to December. The last to arrive every year is the Pine Siskins. Since they are irruptive, I don't get them every year. We got a few last year but I saw none in 2016. I have seen a few Rose-breasted Grosbeaks on their way back south a couple of times in the last 5 years. What is your favorite fall/winter species that you see on your property? oh yeah... Roll Tide! Ha ha!
    1 point
  8. Share your disheveled looking birds here. Northern Cardinal preening it's new feathers. 0C3A2477 by lonestranger102, on Flickr The same Northern Cardinal reaching for those hard to get spots. 0C3A2480 by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    1 point
  9. Spotted and Solitary Sandpipers. Both juveniles.
    1 point
  10. BBC Not today, but one week ago from today. Blue-throated Hummingbird. Blue- throated Hummingbird by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  11. They both look like juveniles too, which gives them quite a different appearance than an adult cardinal and starling.
    1 point
  12. Oops- my bad. Definitely see it as Olive-sided now.
    1 point
  13. Northern Cardinal and European Starling.
    1 point
  14. Looks like a Common -- dark primaries, largely dark crown in September.
    1 point
  15. I'm just some rocks. Definitely not a snake.
    1 point
  16. This is an Olive-sided. Very dark, large bill, white throat, and short tail.
    1 point
  17. Last 2 weeks of August my visitors declined 90%+, picking back up since 9/1. I guess could be migration thing, or something more-natural-and-yummy-than-my feeder-food came out in the area for a few weeks. Or the hawks are hanging around more.
    1 point
  18. Seems like lot of birds in my area (western NC mountains at about 3,000 ft) are just finishing up their molt - cardinals, mockingbirds, bluebirds,... Unless they are bald and shabby looking for other reasons. I don't think my other common feeder birds - nuthatch, brown thrasher, house finch, goldfinch, sparrow, chickadee, starling, dove, ... ever did it (or they hid when doing so).
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. Sorry, I forgot to post it.
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. It appears to have a brown belly patch which would indicate a Gambel's Quail. 🙂
    1 point
  23. Looks like a domestic duck with some Muscovy in it.
    1 point
  24. You're close, these are Double-crested Cormorants. Welcome to Whatbird.
    1 point
  25. 290: Lark Sparrow Lark Sparrow by Greg Miller, on Flickr 291:Harris's Sparrow Harris's Sparrow by Greg Miller, on Flickr 292: Clay-colored Sparrow Clay-colored Sparrow by Greg Miller, on Flickr 293: Swamp Sparrow Swamp Sparrow by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  26. I don't see it in the first photo and the other photos show some white patches, but they don't look large enough to me.
    1 point
  27. Actually, upon perusing eBird, Cinnamon Teal would not be as far out as I first thought. The east coast does get a few of these birds. In this case Liam probably has it nailed, but with birding, you never know what you're going to see. We have had a number of strange and cool birds over the last several years including a Western Tanager, Brown Booby, and Mountain Bluebird. A little to the north of us there has been a Great Kiskadee for several years. Cinnamon Teal seems more likely than any of those.
    1 point
  28. Definitely Willet, but not in breeding plumage. Breeding plumage by late summer should be quite worn -- these feathers are brand new. These are still in juvenile plumage, with a few first-basic feathers on the upper wings and scaps. (Look for the clean, all-gray feathers with no scalloping or spotting.)
    1 point
  29. Sandwich Turn! A way to remember it is like it's bill is dipped in mustard. And you have mustard on a sandwich. @Bobg
    1 point
  30. This is a Willet, still in breeding plumage. The thick bill here is one thing you could use to distinguish it from a yellowlegs.
    1 point
  31. Routine moulting. Notice the newer feathers that have already come in around the edges of the open area. Also notice the colors on the other feathers are still relatively well defined, and the edges of the feathers are still sharp and unworn. Great photo, by the way! The more I look at it, the more I appreciate it. Every time I look at it, I notice new details.
    1 point
  32. This looks like a Common Tern to me, as well. The upper surface of the outer primaries is dark, which pretty much rules out Arctic. Forster's wouldn't show this dark cap this time of year. Gull-billed is quite pale overall, with a much heavier bill. Roseate should only have a couple of outer primaries looking dark. Common's do show some variation in timing on when the bill changes color, and it's possible that this is a second-year bird, which would be expected to have a dark bill.
    1 point
  33. I saw my first Pine Warbler of the season at my suet feeder Sunday.
    1 point
  34. https://youtu.be/y8mn5kFDucY I think I got it uploaded Might not even be a Ruby Throated.
    1 point
  35. Things are starting to move in my area (Costa Mesa/SoCal.) This last week I have seen some of the travelers that just stop for a bath or drink and keep going. I had a Black-throated Gray Warbler yesterday and a Wilson's juvenile today. I'm a fan of the Spotted Towhee. This one still has to grow some head feathers.
    1 point
  36. (Bearcat6 already posted Marsh Wren.) 286. Gray Jay Gray Jay, Santa Fe Ski Basin by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr 287. Northern Saw-Whet Owl Northern Saw-whet Owl by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr 288. Neotropic Cormorant Neotropic Cormorant by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr 289. Least Sandpiper Least Sandpiper by Jerry Friedman, on Flickr
    1 point
  37. If you haven't seen them yet, you might be interested in these Cornell-produced tutorials. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/building-skills-the-4-keys-to-bird-identification/
    1 point
  38. @MeInDallas, eBird is a web site run by Cornell U., which has one of the top ornithology schools. You can create an account and record your bird sightings. There are also apps available to record sightings using a phone or tablet when you're in the field. The advantage to you is it gives you a free place to record your sightings electronically, and to retrieve the data in a variety of ways - by species, location, date, etc. The advantage to Cornell is your sightings are combined with millions of others every year to reveal population and behavior trends over time (such as when birds start migrating out of central Texas ). If you're interested or have questions about using the site, send me a private message. https://ebird.org/
    1 point
  39. Well, let me look out the back door. I filled the feeders on Sunday. Three weeks ago they'd be empty by Thursday, but today they're still around half full. So I'd say things are slowing down here in central SC. (This is another good reason to track your sightings in eBird. You can compare trends from one year to the next. This has been an unsolicited public service announcement.)
    1 point
  40. 247. Reddish Egret Reddish Egret by Jim Joe, on Flickr 248. Roseate Spoonbill IMG_4734 by Jim Joe, on Flickr 249. Great Egret Great Egret by Jim Joe, on Flickr 250. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Yellow-bellied Sapsucker by Jim Joe, on Flickr
    1 point
  41. Bald Eagle - Alaska
    1 point
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