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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/13/2018 in all areas

  1. Great Horned Owl - Long Island, NY Great Horned Owl by Johnny, on Flickr
    4 points
  2. Looks like a Nashville Warbler.
    3 points
  3. Well said, Charlie. You've made several points that I would have said myself. I find myself guilty to a degree about wanting to get a photo first for ID purposes, then watching its behavior, movements, etc. As far as the technology changing the way people bird, that's been happening already, especially for the past 40-50 years. Look what the earlier birders had to work with. Most of the time a bird had to be killed to get to see it up close! Now with affordable cameras with telephoto lens we can get an extremely close-up shot with great detail. I don't really think the advanced technology in itself is going to change the fact that people who love birding will continue to do so in a fulfilling way. And, I also think it can bring more people into birding that wouldn't have been drawn into it before. Look at how many people now who get a photo of a bird with their cell phone will post it here for ID. If they hadn't had the technology to get the photo, I think most of them would have just said, "Hmmmmm, cute bird! Wonder what it was? Oh, well........." Several new members on here started just that way, by posting a photo for ID. When we can give them an ID, tell them something about the bird they saw, and maybe even recommend a good field guide for them, it may spark their interest enough to begin actually looking for birds. I can see where having a way to get a "quick" ID without interacting with people might keep a few out of the loop here, but I think overall it is not going to be detrimental to birding as we know it. And besides, look at how many young birders we have here!! And they started with much more advanced technology than we (us old-timers) did! šŸ˜
    3 points
  4. You're looking at the bill from below, so if it were a flycatcher it would look distinctly broader than this.
    2 points
  5. 2 points
  6. Be prepared to be overrun with rats, mice, roaches, etc. Be careful what you wish for.
    2 points
  7. A bright male Saffron Finch Posed nicely!
    2 points
  8. Is AI going to ruin birding as a hobby? I'd love to hear your opinions.
    1 point
  9. Awesome. Another new yard bird! Thanks!
    1 point
  10. Oh wow! New yard bird! Thanks so much!
    1 point
  11. Agree with American Redstart. Nice bird.
    1 point
  12. Looks like it to me, too, with the buff spectacles.
    1 point
  13. 1 point
  14. This is actually an American Redstart. Vireos have solid gray tails, more distinct face patterns, and hooked bills.
    1 point
  15. Looks like a juvenile in beautiful, fresh plumage.
    1 point
  16. Either a coot or a grebe, with those lobed toes.
    1 point
  17. Any possibility of #4 being a Flycatcher? Iā€™m 50/50 between a Flycatcher and Blackpool. Would Yellow Belly Flycatcher be in your Range?
    1 point
  18. Thanks, TooFly, that's interesting. I hope to look for the bird again. It would be a lifer so I'd like to hear it. Better photos would be nice, too.
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. Looks like the Rock Wren and Lizard were playing peek-a-boo with each other!! šŸ˜
    1 point
  21. Thanks! I emailed him, and within minutes he responded, "Hi, David. Thanks for getting in touch. I see no problems with Lesser Black-backed Gull. It appears rather dark and we might conjecture it's subspecies intermedius, but there's really no way to be certain without a known-origin bird."
    1 point
  22. You may need to zoom in but there really is a Rock Wren playing Peek-a-boo with me in this picture. Bonus points because it's a rock wren hiding on a rock. Extra double bonus combo for also having a lizard on the rock
    1 point
  23. I agree with Lincoln's for 1, definite Bay-breasted for 2, and Northern Parula for 3.
    1 point
  24. Sorry to hear that! Birding can be a Gambel ('s quail) sometime.
    1 point
  25. I'm reminded of an old Doonesbury comic. Mega-rich rock star Jimmy Thudpucker decides to take up stamp collecting. He calls the local coin and stamp shop and says something like, "Hi, it's me again. Would you send over a full set for Bolivia? Yeah, thanks!" His wife approaches and asks how its going. "That was fun. I'll do Brazil tomorrow!" If the app gets people introduced to birding, great, but I have a concern. To me, birding is about more than adding names to a life list. If people become dependent on visual images as identification tools, they'll be missing out on many of the other aspects of bird identification, and missing much of what I think makes birding an enjoyable lifelong hobby. They may not pay attention to a bird's environment, behaviors, seasonal movements, field marks, or the other factors that would help them identify a bird when they don't have a camera or an app. They may not even learn to look for these factors. That's harmless, I guess, but they'll also likely not develop an appreciation for the birds themselves or an understanding of the role they play in the environment. It's one thing to 'collect' stamps, it's another to understand the stamps you're collecting.
    1 point
  26. Agree with all of the above.
    1 point
  27. agree with song sparrow
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. With the lack of barring on the secondaries this is a Broad-winged Hawk.
    1 point
  30. YAY!!!!!!!! One of the best news I've ever heard in my entire life!!
    1 point
  31. Found another Heron eating a snake, I'm afraid we're going to run out of snakes.
    1 point
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