Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/14/2018 in all areas

  1. This is the closest thing to a bird I shot today. It was a dud of a day. bleh.
    5 points
  2. European Starling at Pebble Beach
    4 points
  3. From this afternoon, a Black-throated Blue Warbler.
    3 points
  4. I've put together a Kickstarter to buy this poor bird some new feet. What? Doesn't need them? Why not? Oh.
    3 points
  5. "Dammmmmmmmmmm Daniel" "Actually, my name is Leasburg."
    2 points
  6. Exactly--the feet are in need of a new bird!
    2 points
  7. I think every birder is guilty of that at some point
    2 points
  8. Great Horned Owl - Long Island, NY Great Horned Owl by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  9. We used to have this thread I thought it was pretty good.
    1 point
  10. Pine looks right Bay-breasted, I think, although the flank streaks are odd -- Pine lack the streaking on the back. Yes, Wilson's American Redstart -- that orange base to the tail is unique.
    1 point
  11. 1 point
  12. 1 point
  13. At this link is a great close-up photo of a coot's feet; I would say the coot suggestion is right on the money https://www.audubon.org/news/better-know-bird-american-coot-and-its-wonderfully-weird-feet
    1 point
  14. This might help, it's a poor job of editing but it brightens things up a bit. I hope @JackieL doesn't mind my quick edit. 30756401468_78586eb5cd_o by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    1 point
  15. 1. Yes, Great Crested Flycatcher 2. American Redstart 3. Western Palm Warbler
    1 point
  16. 1 point
  17. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker appears to be a black-crowned variant. I love seeing those.
    1 point
  18. I never realized that phalaropes have lobed toes -- neat! But their lobes aren't divided by the bones the way we see here, rather they're continuous from base of the toes to the tips, so we can rule that out here.
    1 point
  19. While I applaud the idea in general, I think there's no 'right' or 'wrong' on this particular topic. Tools are tools. Sometimes right and wrong are determined by how we use them. Sometimes neither apply and we're just discussing personal preferences. @Administrator answered several questions for me in another discussion regarding birding apps before I concluded that they don't (currently) fit the way I bird. ('I bird'? 'iBird'! Get it? I made a funny! HA! I just kill me!)
    1 point
  20. I agree, looks good for a Cooper's.
    1 point
  21. That long tail is indicative of the Accipiter genus (Cooper's/Sharp-shinned) and the rounded tail end with a white tip suggests Cooper's.
    1 point
  22. Agree with red-tailed; an immature bird. Beautiful photos!
    1 point
  23. This is a Red-tailed Hawk. The streaky band around the belly is a good mark.
    1 point
  24. The bulbous brown chest contrasting with the white belly remind me of Pectoral, plus bill is about the right size. Hard to tell though!
    1 point
  25. You may have to trust me a little on this one! Ferruginous hawk babies near Malheur in Oregon
    1 point
  26. Now you know why you've never seen a grebe and coots are rare 🙂 Phalaropes have feet like that too (at least I can't tell the difference in pictures), but they'd be half that size. (The typical tarsus length of female Wilson's, the biggest species, is 34-38 mm, or about 1.4 in, and from your figure of 6 inches, the tarsi would be about 3 inches.) I think this was a rare visit by a grebe or late coot to your area.
    1 point
  27. FYI, I'm a network administrator so I see technology altering the workplace daily. I don't have 'fears' as such (a word I was careful to not use). I'm just used to pointing out the potential negatives of converting an analog process to digital. The downsides are usually outweighed by the productivity gains, but I like people to know up front that downsides do indeed exist. I have little doubt the technology will eventually advance to the point where an electronic tool is reliably more accurate than a human being. I don't see any reason why that would stop anyone from birding unless they were looking for an excuse. Cars haven't stopped people from walking or running for pleasure. We do crossword puzzles manually although a computer could solve them in seconds. Bird Brain said "When we can give them an ID, tell them something about the bird they saw, and maybe even recommend a good field guide for them, it may spark their interest enough to begin actually looking for birds." I realized that regardless why people asks, as birders it's our responsibility to encourage their budding interest. Providing a positive response is our first step to encouraging people. From there we can hope they'll become interested enough to learn about birds in detail, beyond basic identification. I'll just put my soapbox back in the truck now.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. BBC Not today, but one week ago from today. Blue-throated Hummingbird. Blue- throated Hummingbird by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  30. I struggle with spring warblers, fall warblers, and any warbler that isn't Yellow-Rumped, Pine, or Prothonotary.
    1 point
  31. Elegant trogan, southeast AZ....Lifer
    1 point
  32. Bald Eagle - Alaska
    1 point
  33. Laughing Gull Chasing Parasitic Jaeger by Greg Miller, on Flickr American Bittern by Greg Miller, on Flickr Rough-legged Hawk - Light Morph by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...