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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/20/2018 in all areas

  1. Hi Tony! Yes, I have a field guide, it's called 'The Audubon Field Guide to North American Birds.' It's kind of old though (from 1977) but I love it and refer to it often. I'm pretty new to birding but am trying to learn what I can. Yes, I definitely wish to understand how to know the ID's are correct. After I receive an ID on this forum, I do an online search for the bird and read up on Wikipedia, Audobon or Allaboutbirds websites. I also read up in the field guide. The way I've been trying to learn birds is just by being outside, finding them and observing them, taking photos and then reading about them when I get home. This forum and the people on this forum have been immeasurably helpful. :)
    2 points
  2. The beast seems to have yellow under-tail coverts, but nothing else about the bird seems to suggest a species with yellow under-tail coverts. Thus, I think that the bird's coloration is off in these pix. The legs look dark (perhaps with pale toes), so, if correct, most of the warbler species with entirely yellow underparts are ruled out on leg color. The yellow throat contrasting fairly strongly with the olive face suggests Pine Warbler, but the wing bars look too weak for that species, more like those of Palm. Are the tertial fringes too strong for Pine? If so, they're certainly too strong for Palm. All in all, I'm not sure of the ID of this bird. I lean toward Pine, but I think that "warbler sp." is a fine entry.
    2 points
  3. Possibly my favorite shot so far this year!
    2 points
  4. Crissal Thrasher- a new one for me!
    2 points
  5. Is this a female Wigeon? Taken yesterday in SW Idaho. Thanks!
    1 point
  6. Definitely not a chat, I think you have an orange-crowned warbler
    1 point
  7. 1. House Sparrows 2. (Feral) Rock Pigeon 3. Black-headed Gull 4. Common Wood-Pigeon 5. Hooded Crow 6. White Wagtail 7. Yellow-legged Gull likely, but someone with better experience on juvenile gulls from Europe should probably confirm. 8. Italian Sparrow
    1 point
  8. BTW -- The term "shorebird" is used in birding to refer only to members of a few bird families (though only the 1st, 3rd, 12th, 13th, and 14th are of regular occurrence in the US and Canada): Scolopacidae -- sandpipers Rostratulidae -- painted snipe Jacanidae -- jacana Thincoridae -- seedsnipe Pedionomidae -- Plains Wanderer Glareolidae -- coursers and pratincoles Pluvianidae -- Egyptian Plover Dromadidae -- Crab Plover (I really want to see this one!) Burhinidae -- thick-knees Pluvianellidae -- Magellanic Plover Ibidorhynchidae -- Ibisbill (I really, REALLY want to see this one!!) Recurvirostridae -- avocets and stilts Haematopodidae -- oystercatchers Charadriidae -- plovers
    1 point
  9. Pic 1 -- Caspian and Sandwich Pic 2 -- Caspian and 2 Commons Pic 3 -- Caspian and Common
    1 point
  10. The first pic has a Green-winged Teal -- note the strong eyeline, the very different feather patterning below, and the pale triangle under the tail. All of the Mallards look fine for Mallard. Females in alternate plumage and juvs (which start with black bills) have darker plumage than do basic-plumaged females. The adult female is quite worn -- she's been wearing that plumage since about March. Domestic-type Mallards are, virtually to a bird, larger and larger-butted than "wild-type" Mallards.
    1 point
  11. Wings extending beyond tail tip, no webbing between toes, scapulars extensively black = Baird's
    1 point
  12. Definitely a juv calurus (Western) Red-tailed
    1 point
  13. This is a molting young-of-the-year Chipping Sparrow -- streaks are visible on the bird's left side.
    1 point
  14. Bay-breasted Warbler.
    1 point
  15. Of course, better pix would also do the trick.
    1 point
  16. In flight, the difference between the appearance of the legs in Greater Yellowlegs versus Lesser Yellowlegs is the same as between Black-crowned Night-Heron and Yellow-crowned Night-Heron.
    1 point
  17. Philly. All vireos have blue-ish legs; no warbler do.
    1 point
  18. https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/54.pdf
    1 point
  19. The very long tail (assisted by the short primary projection) rules out all but Dusky and Gray. The bill pattern rules out Gray, leaving Dusky, which is - far and away - the most-common Empidonax on Colorado's plains in fall after early August.
    1 point
  20. Juvenile passerines generally have the tails that they're going to wear for the next year when they leave the nest.
    1 point
  21. Probably is good, but I don't have enough experience with young Woodies.
    1 point
  22. Not all Eastern Wood-Pewees have obviously yellow mandibles. However, all Contopus flycatchers (the genus of the wood-pewees and Olive-sided) have very short legs; phoebes have long legs.
    1 point
  23. I am curious. Do you have a good field guide (Sibley or National Geographic)? Do you wish to understand how to know that the IDs are correct?
    1 point
  24. By the way, I imagine the hawk looked distinctly smaller than the eagles, if they were at about the same height. Juvenile Bald Eagles, like those of almost all birds, are the same size as the adults by the time they can fly, so that would be a way to tell this bird wasn't an eagle.
    1 point
  25. Agreed, juvenile Red-tailed Hawk.
    1 point
  26. Actually, Soras do breed in North Dakota, but they mostly stay out of sight in marshes. I'd bet this one got injured while migrating. Welcome to Whatbird, Tiatake and Tser!
    1 point
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. Well, very gray tone appears to rule out Cordilleran (and Yellow-bellied). The mostly dark lower mandible doesn't fit Traill's. The short primaries aren't really right for Hammond's (or Acadian). The wingbars and tertial edges seem rather dull, although they don't appear very worn -- that would seem to rule out Least. And there's too much dark on the bill for Gray, which leaves us with a tentative (always with silent Empids, often even in hand) Dusky.
    1 point
  30. Wild Turkey by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Looks like a rather light juvenile -- this is a fairly typical plumage pattern at that age. When you see them overhead the wings have a rather distinctive shape.
    1 point
  33. Looks better for an immature male Common Yellowthroat to me.
    1 point
  34. The chunky shape and markings rule out all falcons and Accipiters. Prairie Falcons are much smaller with proportionately larger heads and eyes. Northern Harriers have distinct owl-like faces and relatively slim bodies. Accipiters are also slimmer/more elongated.
    1 point
  35. Common Nighthawk Anhauc NWR 7-18 one 5 i saw that day Common Nighthawk in flight Anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. Ring Billed Gull
    1 point
  37. Small portion of a flock of scaup seen this spring in Barataria bay
    1 point
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