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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/21/2018 in all areas

  1. Canada Warbler confirmed (not Canadian).
    2 points
  2. 2 points
  3. I could care less Okay, so the Yellow-Crowned extend farther. I've never (knowingly) seen either in flight, just perched. Thanks!
    2 points
  4. I think Northern Waterthrush as well (which is not a thrush but a warbler).
    2 points
  5. August 10, at Potter's Marsh near Anchorage on my cross-continent drive. I saw a group of magpies hassling a merlin. The merlin took off directly at me and I got this picture. Unfortunately, the camera focused on the magpie, but I think it is still a pretty cool action shot. Here is an earlier picture that shows the merlin better.
    2 points
  6. I'm almost finished wading through 8 years of photos for upload to eBird. I've requested ID help on several, but I haven't felt the slightest trace of guilt and not a morsel of remorse.
    2 points
  7. Great Kiskadee Benson State Park 4-18 Great Kiskadee Benson State Park 4-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  8. This is an immature European Starling that is molting into nonbreeding adult plumage.
    2 points
  9. 1 point
  10. Gray belly and no orange on the sides of the neck - looks like a Western Bluebird to me.
    1 point
  11. 1 point
  12. Agree and All About Birds says "Birds in fresh fall plumage show faint yellow on the belly and whitish edging on the folded wing feathers." Maybe the camera kicked up the yellow a bit automatically?
    1 point
  13. The weak wingbars, medium-length primary projection, brown color, and overall shape look better for Eastern Phoebe.
    1 point
  14. I like Tennessee Warbler here.
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/20.pdf
    1 point
  17. It is certainly molting into adult plumage, but European Starlings, as adults, molt only once per year, thus they don't have any other plumage (that is, "breeding" plumage = "non-breeding" plumage in the species).
    1 point
  18. @Tony Leukering Thank you - I will never, ever look at a building the same way again. We're fighting the good fight but man, it's been heart wrenching.
    1 point
  19. Apparently not all of them... http://www.lloydspitalnikphotos.com/v/warblers/nashville_warbler/nashville_warbler_F5R5280.jpg.html
    1 point
  20. Those aren't pintails, the shape and color pattern are both wrong. Domestic Mallards, as The Bird Nuts said.
    1 point
  21. EXCELLENT! If only more building owners would do something like this AND THEN GET THE DATA POOLED ON A LARGE SCALE AND HAVE IT ANALYZED.
    1 point
  22. Okay, then. All vireos have blue-ish legs, a feature matched by very few other passerines (essentially equal to "songbirds;" all birds from flycatchers to the end of the taxonomic order, which is followed, generally, in field guides -- though beware books that put swifts with swallows -- the former are not passerines). Orioles as a group form one of those exceptions. Any warblers with such a strong head pattern would have wing bars. Leg and bill colors are excellent ID cues ignored by many birders; pay attention to them. https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/59.pdf https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/56.pdf https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/57.pdf https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/54.pdf https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/13.pdf https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/17.pdf https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/24.pdf
    1 point
  23. Greater Yellowlegs flocks tend to be small and individuals within the flocks to be fairly dispersed. Lessers fly in large flocks that are relatively tight. Not tight like peep/Dunlin/Sanderling/etc. flocks, but tight for yellowlegs. Also note that the legs look very long and seem to extend well beyond the tail.
    1 point
  24. Charlie - I work for Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Overland Park, Kansas. Since January 1, 2018 we have been collecting and logging window strikes on our campus. This form was created by the project manager and we log all the results in iNaturalist.org https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/jccc-bird-collision-study We'll use the data to mitigate the strike areas. The deceased birds are then put in bags, frozen and turned over to Kansas University.
    1 point
  25. This one didn't like me sneaking up behind it, so it decided to keep an eye on me. It must have thought I looked a little shady because it decided to keep two eyes on me.
    1 point
  26. It is a Waterthrush. I'm not sure which but leaning Northern.
    1 point
  27. Thank you, HamRHead, they are such beautiful little ducks! And they have eluded me up until this sighting.
    1 point
  28. On my cross continent drive, I got pictures of roughly 50 different mammals. Big ones: Little ones: And some unusual ones (mink):
    1 point
  29. The first are indeed Wood Ducks. I am not familiar with the second. No worries on the old photos. Sightings never expire.
    1 point
  30. Thanks hbvol50, I think/hope so too. Both lifers. Gosh I feel kind of guilty listing 2 year old sightings..
    1 point
  31. Here's a thought: with 10,000 + species of birds in the world, we're all noobs!
    1 point
  32. But there are so many pins now! I wonder if there could be one pin that would link to a separate pin page. But the idea here is a good one--a resource guide for recommended field guides, desk references, apps, and websites. The Warbler Guide is one resource I would recommend. Both the book and the app are great. I have one complaint about the app, however in that you can't zoom in on the photos. This might not matter as much on a tablet but on a small phone screen it would be a helpful feature.
    1 point
  33. First fall Red-eyed Vireos can still have rather dark eyes. In a plumage this complete a Black-whiskered should show at least some sign of the trademark whiskers.
    1 point
  34. It's possible that this particular bird lost it's tail to a predator and the new tail feathers haven't grown in yet. If a cat, for example, grabbed the bird by just the tail, the bird may lose it's feathers but still escape with it's life. Not sure of the likelihood of that happening but it sounds quite plausible in my head.
    1 point
  35. The bird is facing the camera--we can see its underparts and wings. Some of the undertail coverts are visible below the branch.
    1 point
  36. I think you got them both correct
    1 point
  37. @Evie12, you might want to consider a newer field guide, for a couple of reasons. One is that the range maps for many species have changed greatly since 1977. Another is that some species have had their names changed by the ornithology agencies that manage these things. (Farewell, "Rufous-Sided Towhee" ) You might also find it helpful to search the internet for birding groups in your area. You'll get better faster by spending field time with experienced birders. Many groups hold weekly or monthly walks in local areas. Either way, have fun!
    1 point
  38. The streaking on the flanks of House is outside the purple color on the underparts.
    1 point
  39. Crissal Thrasher- a new one for me!
    1 point
  40. Wild Turkey by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  41. Not from today, but I just uploaded them. VERY sleepy Great Horned Owl Comma sp. : Boisduval's Blue (I think) Thicket Hairstreak: Western Side-blotched Lizard: Adorable Ground Squirrel: And finally, lifer Spruce Grouse:
    1 point
  42. Anhinga-cestry.com 23andChickadee.com
    1 point
  43. This is an Olive-sided. Very dark, large bill, white throat, and short tail.
    1 point
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