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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/18/2018 in all areas

  1. This is the first Tufted-titmouse that Ive photographed since last winter.
    5 points
  2. Black Rat Snake by Greg Miller, on Flickr Eastern Chipmunk by Greg Miller, on Flickr Lifer Bobcat by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    5 points
  3. Red fox photo I took a while back
    4 points
  4. BBC Sora Sora by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    3 points
  5. Rose-breasted Grosbeak by hbvol50, on Flickr
    2 points
  6. I'm seeing a lot of chickadees lately.
    2 points
  7. BBC Photographed this bird 10-16-2018 at the Riparian Preserve Water Ranch Gilbert, Az. Thanks nce again. DSC_0936 (2) by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    2 points
  8. American Kestrel. 🙂
    2 points
  9. In the backyard Young Cooper's Hawk with prey (House Finch) by hbvol50, on Flickr
    2 points
  10. Eastern Bluebird by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    2 points
  11. I'm replying to the replies to my questions here because the reply field on the topic page won't stay open! Thanks for those replies. I'm glad to know it's not unique for Flickers to stay in one place for more than a day or so. The posted photos are beautiful! The map is interesting, thanks for the link. Kami
    1 point
  12. I'm by no means an expert but a lot of the time birds will stop to rest and feed for a while. I assume that they then wait for favourable wind and weather patterns to resume their journey. Flickers often feed on ants on the ground.
    1 point
  13. Messy House Finch to my eyes.
    1 point
  14. By the way, I also saw them feeding in the grass. Here are some pix I took yesterday:
    1 point
  15. Hi and welcome to Whatbird! I'm on Long Island and have been out in nature on LI the past couple of days (including today.) Interesting you ask this because I have noticed and was wondering the same thing myself. I have seen lots of Northern Flickers yesterday and today! I'm guessing maybe they have recently arrived. I'm not sure the answer to your question, but just wanted to say that I have also noticed Northern Flickers here on LI the past couple of days.
    1 point
  16. Hi! Welcome to Whatbird! eBird is an excellent website for learning about bird behavior. Here is the sightings map for migration in NYC of Yellow-shafted Northern Flickers. If it's any help, the red-shafted flickers I get here occasionally flock at my house over a period of a week or more, mostly during migration season (don't know why). https://ebird.org/map/yesfli?neg=true&env.minX=155.69237000960777&env.minY=9.447971766050006&env.maxX=2.411120009607771&env.maxY=71.35671329491146&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=8-11&bmo=8&emo=11&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2018
    1 point
  17. Never mind, I found it. https://gullsofappledore.wordpress.com/sighting-guide/ All 25 sightings of the bird are within a few miles of where I saw him.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. Evening Grosbeak. 🙂
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. Just to clear up some terminology, wood-pewees are flycatchers as well. Common names can be deceiving, and not all flycatchers will have the word "flycatcher" in their name. This is even more confusing when you look at things globally, because there are plenty of other families of birds in the world with species that have "flycatcher" in their name, but they aren't particularly closely related to "our" flycatchers in the family Tyrannidae.
    1 point
  22. Black-backed Woodpecker:
    1 point
  23. Location and streaking underneath favors Indigo Bunting.
    1 point
  24. BBC Photographed 10-17-2018 at Riparian Preserve Water Ranch; Gilbert, Arizona. Once again thanks for your help. DSC_0419 (3) by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  25. I have a hard time FINDING warblers.
    1 point
  26. Wow, never would guess that. Fall colors I presume.
    1 point
  27. Awesome shots, Greg!!
    1 point
  28. Agree with Lesser Yellowlegs....my nemesis!!!
    1 point
  29. With the narrow white bands and wide black bands on the tail plus the black and white pattern in the wings, this is a Red-shouldered Hawk.
    1 point
  30. Thank you both, a new one for me!!
    1 point
  31. Thought initially this was a palm or maybe one of the many Blackpolls around right now, but I am not so sure with that yellow back and no wingbars.., Fall warblers are so confusing..lol..Taken yesterday in south jersey,Thanks in advance
    1 point
  32. Zigzag Heron (this guy is so cool) Photo credit google images:
    1 point
  33. Sorry, I meant pale feet as the mark to differentiate from Bay-breasted, which is what we tell people to look for. I see now you're asking about Pine. Pine Warblers have a slightly thicker bill and less of an eyeline, and they're usually either quite dull or bright yellow on most of the underparts. Blackpoll tend to have more distinct streaking underneath, but that's somewhat variable and depends on the angle, and they tend to be brightest on the throats and upper breast.
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. Song Sparrow by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. For the first time in I don't know how many years I actually had a successful brood of Bluebirds this year! One baby was killed by a HOSP, but I literally caught the HOSP in action and was able to get a Spooker up to prevent additional damage. 3 babies successfully fledged, though I wasn't able to catch any photos of said fledging.
    1 point
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