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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/25/2018 in all areas

  1. Great Blue Heron by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    3 points
  2. Speaking of sunsets... Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan on August 30. I suppose this could go under "critters" as well.
    2 points
  3. Purple Finch Purple Finch (M) by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  4. last nights sunset
    2 points
  5. As we mentioned in our November iBird WINGSPAN Newsletter, iBird Pro version 12.0 is a major update and has been released with the following features: AOU Update. Version 12 of iBird now includes all of the 2018 American Ornithological Union (AOU) convention changes to North American bird species. Tap this link to go to the iBird Pro Version 12 product page: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ibird-pro-guide-to-birds/id308018823?mt=8 iBird Photo Sleuth IAP. We added iBird Photo Sleuthโ€”this feature uses artificial intelligence and machine language to identify the species of any photo. Previously Photo Sleuth was only available as a stand alone app (and it still is). New Composite Drawings. We've added 49 incredibly beautiful illustrations which we invite you to judge. See below. iBird Ultimate and Plus Frozen. We are sad to announce that iBird Ultimate and iBird Plus have been frozen. See below for details. AOU Update. Every year we bring iBird Pro into alignment with the most recent AOU (American Ornithological Union) Supplement. The AOU is the governing organization we rely on to determine what species of birds in North America have split, merged, gone extinct or just been eliminated from the list of North American birds. And so our job is to update the 900+ species in iBird to reflect all these changes, and it's a major undertaking. If you've owned iBird Pro for a few years you are probably familiar with these updates. They can cause a lot of controversy since you may find your favorite bird's name has changed, or even worse, itโ€™s been discovered to be part of some other family. We also take this opportunity to introduce new features to iBird, to fix any bugs our customers have discovered and improved the user interface. Click here to see the AOU changes to this new version 12.0 of iBird Pro. iBird Photo Sleuth In-app Purchase. Photo Sleuth is an IAP. Besides all these new AOU changes, this version of iBird Pro has what we think is a fantastic new in-app purchase feature called iBird Photo Sleuth. See the 4 screens above. Photo Sleuth is an app we developed earlier this year that uses Artificial Intelligence to identify any bird of North America from a photograph. What is amazing is that the photo can be of very low quality and it will still figure out what species it is. In the example above its using AI to ID a sparrow from behind and it guesses with 93% confidence it's a Golden-crowned Sparrow. Birders have been raving about the stand-alone version of Photo Sleuth (click this link to read the reviews of 4.9 out of 5 stars). By putting Photo Sleuth in iBird Pro as an in-app purchase, we think more birders will discover how much this enhances your ID skills. And to make it even more attractive we cut the price of Photo Sleuth by 50% over the stand-alone version. Click here to read about all the features of the stand-alone version of iBird Photo Sleuth and see the great reviews. The IAP version in Pro is exactly the same. New Composite Drawings. In our interest to stick to our corporate mantra, "if it ain't broken, break it", we have been hard at work updating the illustrations in iBird (and whatbird.com) that don't live up to our (and yours as a customer) demanding standards. So to make it possible to get your thoughts on these changes we set up a Google Form (bless your heart Google) that lets you examine each illustration, turn on and off its field marks and most importantly, leave your opinion of the quality of the drawing. Getting your feedback on our art is a new idea, but given the enormous effort it takes, we'd like to know if its worth the effort. Click here to see What's New and Leave Feedback About New Our Illustrations. iBird Ultimate and Plus Frozen. Sadly we had to freeze both of these apps to satisfy Apple's new goal to remove what they think is clutter in the App Store. We had to create a new version of iBird Pro that allowed customers to download databases from other countries and upgrade the features to give the equivalent of iBird Ultimate. We expect a lot of you will be unhappy and so we created this FAQ to explain all of the details. It also explains what you can do about it. Please read this FAQ and leave us your thoughts: iBird Ultimate and Plus: Why Can't I Update?
    1 point
  6. I think this may be a Rufous-naped Lark , but would like someone with more expertise to confirm. Photographed last week in Kenya on the Masai Mara. Thanks!
    1 point
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
  9. Yeah, Savannahs do tend to be lighter than Songs (they are more of a tan color rather than rich brown). Savannahs also have thinner, pink beaks. Another ID mark for Lincoln's is they have a buffy wash underneath the streaking on the breast and flanks (with a white belly) and in the malar area (from the beak to the sides of the throat).
    1 point
  10. BBC Roseate skimmer 10-24-2018 Roseate skimmer by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  11. Yeah, looking at it closer, those look like white wing patches, not windows, and the head does not look hawk like. Not sure what it is. I don't have any experience with Red-bellied Woodpecker, so I can't confirm or deny.
    1 point
  12. .... that's right, that's right, we bad!!!
    1 point
  13. Caveat: I am even worse at tree identification than I am at bird identification! ๐Ÿ˜ I really know nothing about trees, but I did a little internet surfing. I have come to believe the tree on the left is a spruce. If it is a spruce, given the location of the picture (south central Alaska), it is likely a white spruce or a black spruce. White spruce have the larger cones of the two (1.4-2.8 inches). If it is a white spruce, then the birds are in the 11-14 inch range. If it is a black spruce, then the birds would be even smaller. So, I think you've got this right. Birds appear to be Sharp-shinned Hawks. ๐Ÿ‘ Of course, my whole house of cards is built upon a tree identification made by someone who has one hour of experience ๐Ÿ™„.
    1 point
  14. I am not an expert, but I am guessing this gull is almost done transitioning to breeding plumage. They have black bills in non-breeding plumage. Bill size is good as well as mantle shade.
    1 point
  15. Very much appreciated. I did a little bit of research and now understand how important it is to be able to eliminate the Mallard and its variations initially for duck IDs. For any other "learners" who happen to read this thread I've attached a link to a Mallard guide I came across. https://www.thespruce.com/mallard-identification-tips-385984 Regards.
    1 point
  16. Yeah, the pics are not the best, but I believe there is enough here for me to confirm your IDs. Both appear to have bill issues. The Tennessee looks to be missing feathers at the base of the bill, making it look crazy long. The Palm has a broken upper mandible, and is indeed the same bird in the two pics.
    1 point
  17. With that big droopy bill and those black legs, looks better for Laughing Gull to me.
    1 point
  18. With those translucent wing "windows" and the pattern on those secondaries it looks like a Red-shouldered Hawk. That would also explain the reddish body color.
    1 point
  19. I joined the site a couple of days ago but, in my excitement to start receiving help, missed the important "must read' introductory emails. Excellent guide for posting (I must do better!!!). I also noticed you provide encouragement where necessary. Much appreciated Charlie.
    1 point
  20. Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 10/23/18, Dearborn, MI
    1 point
  21. Green Heron Anahuc NWR 4-18' Green Heron Anahuc NWR 4-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  22. Rainbow Falls - Western North Carolina
    1 point
  23. Volcano Hummingbird, White-plumed Antbird, and a Yellow-throated Toucan pretending to be a banana ๐Ÿ˜›
    1 point
  24. Twelve-spotted Skimmer by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr Tiger Swallowtail by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr
    1 point
  25. 1 point
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