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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/26/2018 in all areas

  1. Seen today drinking from a puddle:
    5 points
  2. From a couple weeks ago: Mountain Chickadee Lesser Goldfinch fledgling Western Bluebird
    5 points
  3. Is this a Merlin? Bird of prey and prey Shot today at Jones Beach, NY. I think the unfortunate victim is an Eastern Phoebe.
    3 points
  4. Great Blue Heron by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    3 points
  5. East Fork Hood River, Oregon
    2 points
  6. Purple Finch Purple Finch (M) by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  7. Green Heron Anahuc NWR 4-18' Green Heron Anahuc NWR 4-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  8. I agree...Downy...no shoulder spur, sharp-pointed bill that is shorter than the length of its head. πŸ™‚
    1 point
  9. Yup, a Pine Siskin...nice capture! πŸ™‚
    1 point
  10. That’s a Bare-throated Tiger-Heron.
    1 point
  11. Yes, the comparison description by Creeker sums up what I have experienced. Attached is a Merlin in flight with a similar silhouette to your first image, probably doesn't help as I don't have a similar one for a Kestrel.
    1 point
  12. Bumps are generally just a way to bring your post back to the top so that it gets more attention. If someone notices that a post has gone unanswered but don't feel qualified to provide an ID, they will sometimes make a comment, and "bump" is often the comment used.
    1 point
  13. I am 100% sure this is a Red-bellied Woodpecker. I think the angle creates a perceptional distortion, making the tail appear shorter than it actually is. Not to mention, depending on the way the bird flexes its feathers, the tail may appear smaller or larger. Here is another Red-bellied Woodpecker for comparison. That white half moon pattern is pretty unmistakable; check out those primaries!
    1 point
  14. Agreed, Pine Warbler, nice close up profile shot too!
    1 point
  15. Just to clarify the behavior, Merlins fly very fast and direct, while Kestrels are a little more buoyant and apt to stop and hover. Small birds are way more afraid of a passing over Merlin.
    1 point
  16. The behavior sounds like Merlin, and I think that's what I'm seeing in the pics.
    1 point
  17. It's the Lincoln's Sparrows that have the blue-gray superciliums. I guess you could just call it gray, but to me it looks like it has a bluish tint when compared to the rest of the bird's brown feathers. Here's a good comparison: https://www.birdzilla.com/images/stories/id/frequent-four.jpg
    1 point
  18. BBC Roseate skimmer 10-24-2018 Roseate skimmer by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  19. Caveat: I am even worse at tree identification than I am at bird identification! 😁 I really know nothing about trees, but I did a little internet surfing. I have come to believe the tree on the left is a spruce. If it is a spruce, given the location of the picture (south central Alaska), it is likely a white spruce or a black spruce. White spruce have the larger cones of the two (1.4-2.8 inches). If it is a white spruce, then the birds are in the 11-14 inch range. If it is a black spruce, then the birds would be even smaller. So, I think you've got this right. Birds appear to be Sharp-shinned Hawks. πŸ‘ Of course, my whole house of cards is built upon a tree identification made by someone who has one hour of experience πŸ™„.
    1 point
  20. Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 10/23/18, Dearborn, MI
    1 point
  21. Yellow-billed Cuckoo by Mike, on Flickr I will post only here ,lunch time ,best picture of day -next time .
    1 point
  22. May be a common sight but that doesn't make the mallard any less beautiful.
    1 point
  23. Northern Harrier catching some early morning rays.
    1 point
  24. Agree with all of this. It does look like a Lesser Goldfinch to me.
    1 point
  25. I can't comment on the bird's ID but I can tell you that fledglings are very new to flying and will often be seen hopping around on the ground while they get the hang of flying and just as importantly, getting the hang of landing on small branch perches. The parents will be nearby keeping an eye on things but unless the bird is in immediate danger it's best to leave the fledgling alone and just give it the space it, and it's parents need. Here's a link that can be found at the top of the main page of ID forum that offers more info. https://forums.whatbird.com/index.php?/announcement/3-what-to-do-if-you-find-a-baby-or-injured-bird/
    1 point
  26. Wonderful images of these common birds...nice poses, backgrounds, light etc., and all nice and sharp!
    1 point
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