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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/28/2018 in all areas

  1. Cedar Waxwing Cedar Waxwing by Johnny, on Flickr Cedar Waxwing by Johnny, on Flickr
    4 points
  2. I think as long as your artwork doesn't spark arguments about what is porno and what is not you'll be fine šŸ˜„
    3 points
  3. The black bib is starting to come in (first picture), so it's a male. But I think I still see a little bit of yellow gape, and the head colors aren't fully developed for a male, so my call is immature male.
    2 points
  4. Northern Watersnake by Greg Miller, on Flickr Thirsty Possum by Greg Miller, on Flickr Little Brown Bat by Greg Miller, on Flickr Green Frog by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    2 points
  5. Volcano Hummingbird, White-plumed Antbird, and a Yellow-throated Toucan pretending to be a banana šŸ˜›
    2 points
  6. 1 point
  7. To err is human.....it takes a computer to really screw things up!!
    1 point
  8. Auto-correct had one job!!!
    1 point
  9. All Dunlin as far as I can tell.
    1 point
  10. Green Heron, Blue Pond, Big Pine Key
    1 point
  11. Cooper's Hawk - blocky head and long, uneven tail.
    1 point
  12. Wow, never saw one before and now 2 in one day. Thanks
    1 point
  13. As I continue plowing through pictures from my cross continent drive, gull identification has been driving me nuts (as has brown duck identification). I've been setting gulls and brown ducks aside to try to deal with them later. However, these two pictures had made it onto my daily trip blog (labeled TBD) and I would like to go back and identify them on the blog. When I took the pictures, I thought they were two different types of birds because of overall color. Now I've concluded they are both juvenile Mew Gulls. Is this correct? Can the color vary this much on one type of bird? Both pictures were taken in Anchorage, Alaska on August 12. Thanks!
    1 point
  14. I was on Mustang Island , TX, near Corpus Christi, this morning and this was sitting on the power line. It was raptor day, a couple of Osprey, Caracawa's, and 2 i am do not know. Wrong color feet to be an Osprey and the beak is green/grey
    1 point
  15. Redtail Hawk She nest in my backyard every year Mississippi Kite building a nest across the steet
    1 point
  16. Mermet Wildlife Area, Il I waited an hour for him to come off the tree
    1 point
  17. A couple of things. You have to change with tech. If you don't you may leaving a lot of things off that will enhance what you are doing. No, I don't carry a field guide with me or an app. I wait until I get back and fire up the computer to see if I can figure out what I saw. As evidenced by a couple of posts on here today, I am not always successful. I do not have a list a I check off birds, well, maybe raptors, I just look for the picture. I travel all over the country for my job, so that is how I document my travels. My wife gets to travel by my pictures. I heard the same things when the world moved from film to digital. It was going to kill photography. I don't think it did. Maybe we don't spend the time setting up the shot like we used to, but we still move and recompose until we get a shot we like. The only thing we really have changed is that we do not have to pay for film or developing. Now, we can run off a couple of hundred shots and go through and get the few that turn out just right. Maybe it has made us a bit lazy. I think the main thing is that people don't have the patience anymore. They have got to use tech to get it NOW. Birding is a lot like wildlife or train photography, you have to be patient to get what you want. I know I have sat for hours in my backyard taking pictures of the redtail hawk that nests every winter/spring in my backyard. You sitting for an hour waiting for the Bald eagle to take off from the tree to get that shot.
    1 point
  18. The head stripes are also not fully in for an adult male; at least around here they don't lose them in non-breeding.
    1 point
  19. Yeah, I was looking at those same pictures before I posted my question. They're why I wasn't able nail it down to my satisfaction, particularly the head on the male. Thanks for the confirmation!
    1 point
  20. I take that back...Looks like they do look quite different in nonbreeding plumage...https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/House_Sparrow/media-browser/63742401 Sorry about that.
    1 point
  21. Looks like an immature male House Sparrow molting into adult plumage. I believe adult House Sparrows don't really change much during the nonbreeding season.
    1 point
  22. South Ontario. I had previously, without much examination, decided this was Common but I am having second thoughts. The bill profile never seem clear enough to me for ID but I don't see any signs of white around the neck or throat. Thanks for any assistance.
    1 point
  23. Red-breasted Merganser. Its bill is long and thin and pretty much the same width at the base, the nostril is close to the base of the bill, it has a very thin crest, and, as you noted, it doesn't have a white chin patch or neck.
    1 point
  24. I think there is a certain amount of flexibility regarding the content of the art, and photos too, as long as they are your own art/photos and they're not inappropriate for these forums. I am not a moderator but I don't think anyone would object to a drawing showing bird's early ancestors.
    1 point
  25. I'd say Cooper's, with the blocky head, thin streaking, and rounded tail.
    1 point
  26. The junco is a type of sparrow and they often flock with other sparrow species.
    1 point
  27. Since dinosaurs are believed to be moderately related to birds, would posting an image of a Velociraptor I drew count as bird-related?
    1 point
  28. Why do you guys see catbird here? Iā€™m just curious. I believe that the undersides would be darker if it was a catbird.
    1 point
  29. Actually, this one too. In Henderson, outside Las Vegas.
    1 point
  30. Help with identifying this lizard at Valley of Fire, Nevada?
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. I am 100% sure this is a Red-bellied Woodpecker. I think the angle creates a perceptional distortion, making the tail appear shorter than it actually is. Not to mention, depending on the way the bird flexes its feathers, the tail may appear smaller or larger. Here is another Red-bellied Woodpecker for comparison. That white half moon pattern is pretty unmistakable; check out those primaries!
    1 point
  33. Speaking of sunsets... Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan on August 30. I suppose this could go under "critters" as well.
    1 point
  34. Here's one from Oregon
    1 point
  35. Help with ID. Is this a bob cat. Others have been ID'd in this location. Mississippi Gulf Coast. IMG_6281a by H W, on Flickr IMG_6279a by H W, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. While I applaud the idea in general, I think there's no 'right' or 'wrong' on this particular topic. Tools are tools. Sometimes right and wrong are determined by how we use them. Sometimes neither apply and we're just discussing personal preferences. @Administrator answered several questions for me in another discussion regarding birding apps before I concluded that they don't (currently) fit the way I bird. ('I bird'? 'iBird'! Get it? I made a funny! HA! I just kill me!)
    1 point
  37. Well said, Charlie. You've made several points that I would have said myself. I find myself guilty to a degree about wanting to get a photo first for ID purposes, then watching its behavior, movements, etc. As far as the technology changing the way people bird, that's been happening already, especially for the past 40-50 years. Look what the earlier birders had to work with. Most of the time a bird had to be killed to get to see it up close! Now with affordable cameras with telephoto lens we can get an extremely close-up shot with great detail. I don't really think the advanced technology in itself is going to change the fact that people who love birding will continue to do so in a fulfilling way. And, I also think it can bring more people into birding that wouldn't have been drawn into it before. Look at how many people now who get a photo of a bird with their cell phone will post it here for ID. If they hadn't had the technology to get the photo, I think most of them would have just said, "Hmmmmm, cute bird! Wonder what it was? Oh, well........." Several new members on here started just that way, by posting a photo for ID. When we can give them an ID, tell them something about the bird they saw, and maybe even recommend a good field guide for them, it may spark their interest enough to begin actually looking for birds. I can see where having a way to get a "quick" ID without interacting with people might keep a few out of the loop here, but I think overall it is not going to be detrimental to birding as we know it. And besides, look at how many young birders we have here!! And they started with much more advanced technology than we (us old-timers) did! šŸ˜
    1 point
  38. I'm reminded of an old Doonesbury comic. Mega-rich rock star Jimmy Thudpucker decides to take up stamp collecting. He calls the local coin and stamp shop and says something like, "Hi, it's me again. Would you send over a full set for Bolivia? Yeah, thanks!" His wife approaches and asks how its going. "That was fun. I'll do Brazil tomorrow!" If the app gets people introduced to birding, great, but I have a concern. To me, birding is about more than adding names to a life list. If people become dependent on visual images as identification tools, they'll be missing out on many of the other aspects of bird identification, and missing much of what I think makes birding an enjoyable lifelong hobby. They may not pay attention to a bird's environment, behaviors, seasonal movements, field marks, or the other factors that would help them identify a bird when they don't have a camera or an app. They may not even learn to look for these factors. That's harmless, I guess, but they'll also likely not develop an appreciation for the birds themselves or an understanding of the role they play in the environment. It's one thing to 'collect' stamps, it's another to understand the stamps you're collecting.
    1 point
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