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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/30/2018 in all areas

  1. American Robin American Robin by Johnny, on Flickr American Robin by Johnny, on Flickr
    5 points
  2. An aspen grove glows in the late October sun near Mt Adams, Washington
    5 points
  3. Caught this Cardinal in the morning light... Northern Cardinal by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    4 points
  4. _91A3027.jpg by chipperatl2, on Flickr _91A2607.jpg by chipperatl2, on Flickr
    4 points
  5. From Friday but I just uploaded it. Lifer Barred Owl:
    4 points
  6. Dunlins have much longer bills, there are some in the last few shots to compare with. I like Baird's here too.
    2 points
  7. Zurich Switzerland
    2 points
  8. How about Cinnamon Teal for #2? Warmer coloration overall, along with a plain face and a red eye. Cinnamon Teal have decent-sized bills, doesn't look extreme enough for shoveler here IMO. Angle is tricky too.
    1 point
  9. Ugh...I didn't even think goldfinch. This is why I love this site! Thank you!
    1 point
  10. Looks like an American Goldfinch to me. EDIT: Sniped! Agreed with akiley.
    1 point
  11. 1 point
  12. Welcome to the forum! I agree with Winter Wren.
    1 point
  13. My guess is a female American redstart, based on the wing/tail posture. Also the colors seem to match.
    1 point
  14. Why are you disimissing Dunlin? Bill looks too long for your three mentioned suspects. BASA and WRSA would also display the long primaries extended above the tail.
    1 point
  15. Since I'm a complete noob at this, I often start with a whatbird search by location to give me a full list of possibilities. Otherwise, I am afraid I will tunnel vision on the first decent fit I stumble across and miss a better fit (I don't know what I don't know). Nashville Warbler did not come up on this initial search list because Alaska is not in its range. I then look up the birds on the search list in Nat Geo or the Warbler Guide, including reading up on birds they list as similar. While doing this, Nashville came up as a similar bird and got on my candidate list. I couldn't find a good reason to rule it out, but ultimately guessed OC because of range alone. The ebird sightings map shows a few Nashvilles in SE Alaska (out of the range), but I decided the probability was too low. Not sure if I am putting too much stock in the range maps... PS... yes, this is a laborious process. I am probably spending an hour per bird on some of these harder birds and I am going through hundreds and hundreds of pictures from my trip. But I don't feel I have the experience to cut corners and make assumptions. I guess that is why this is called a hobby đŸ™‚. PPS... How the heck did I get a smiley in my original post instead of a capital C? I wonder what strange sequence of keys I hit.
    1 point
  16. 1 point
  17. Looks like a juvenile Green-winged Pytilia. https://www.hbw.com/ibc/photo/melba-finch-pytilia-melba/juvenile-ground The beak shape and size, posture, and color are all wrong for Familiar Chat.
    1 point
  18. Canyon De Chelley, Az.
    1 point
  19. In the first image, I see a Semipalmated Sandpiper with a Greater Yellowlegs. In the second, I see a Greater.
    1 point
  20. BBC Roseate skimmer 10-24-2018 Roseate skimmer by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. I've had a Red-breasted Sapsucker and a Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker in my yard within the past two weeks . The Sapsucker was 400 miles away from normal range and was a first county record, and the Flicker is a long ways away and a 3rd county record https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49251110 https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49056867
    1 point
  23. Twelve-spotted Skimmer by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr Tiger Swallowtail by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr
    1 point
  24. Sunrise yesterday in south jersey
    1 point
  25. Heceta Head, Oregon
    1 point
  26. This mornings sunrise produced some awesome ray-like clouds at Mt Hood and White River.
    1 point
  27. Had a funny moment today. In a matter of ten minutes four different species of woodpecker landed on one perch. Almost as if they were taking turns. Now I want to make this perch a patch just to see what else I can get on it. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker by Patrick Felker, on Flickr Northern Flicker by Patrick Felker, on Flickr Red-bellied Woodpecker by Patrick Felker, on Flickr Downy Woodpecker by Patrick Felker, on Flickr
    1 point
  28. I think I could have done a much better job on this golden if I would have been better prepared for the fly by. Expect the unexpected I guess! Seattle's low light and clouds didn't help.
    1 point
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