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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/31/2018 in all areas

  1. Northern Wheatear by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    5 points
  2. Caught this Cardinal in the morning light... Northern Cardinal by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    3 points
  3. Yeah, agreed - none of those other options work. Townsend's Solitaires are long and skinny and light gray with strong white spectacles, not to mention peachy colored patches on the wings. Thrushes are big-bellied birds with longer skinnier beaks. Varied Thrushes are bright orange with a strong supercilium. Pipits are much lighter than this and have strong stripes down the front. (Also their posture is kind of blackbird-like.) Just looking at this guy, make sure you keep in mind all of the characteristics. Measure the beak relative to head width. This guy definitely has that thick beak of a finch. Secondly, its shape is that of a finch. Tail length, body length, and the rest of the overall proportions look great (looks very "small and chubby"). Lastly, the coloration - very dark all over with distinctive rosy on the shoulders and belly. As far as females/immature, most of the time females or immature birds (fancy term for young) are blotchier and not as distinct as the adult males. Also, immature birds generally show a yellow gape which this guy obviously doesn't have. Just a photo of Rosy-Finches... notice how the one towards the front has his neck extended whereas the one in the middle is squashed down. Your bird is well within the range of a small and chubby finch to an extended finch. I hope this helps you and the "bird person"!
    2 points
  4. Halloween, so @Melierax digs up a zombie.
    1 point
  5. Why exactly would she be suggesting American Pipit? Are we looking at the same photo here, just out of curiosity? If not, she’s probably not as knowledgeable of a “bird person” as you think
    1 point
  6. Might be a Green-winged Teal, don't know if I can guarantee it but it looks pretty good.
    1 point
  7. Looks better for a Gadwall.
    1 point
  8. I completely agree with you about the value of using undertail patterns. They are useful, but relying solely on them to make an ID when it's not one of the diagnostic pattern species is fraught with difficulty and challenges. I've noticed in my experience that individual variation, molting, etc in warblers often leads them to have different appearances than the "norm" that is depicted in a guide like this. I'm not saying this guide isn't valuable, but they can often be misleading, since not all individuals show the "cookie cutter" undertail pattern for the species. Back to this bird, I can also see Nashville as a possibility. That eyering looks rather strong, but not out of range for OC, in my opinion. I'm not completely sure, but I still like Orange-crowned here.
    1 point
  9. I've been hoping akiley would pipe back in as she/he is obviously 100 times more experienced than me. Having said that, two comments: * RE: Jimmyos comment on OC's solid yellow underside shown on pg 114-115 of The Warbler Guide. I just noticed that on page 378 of the same book they show two pictures of OC's from below. Both show white near the legs. My take-away is the underside guide can't be taken too literally. * I'm still hung up on the location where I took the picture (Haines Alaska) vs. the Nashville's range map. The picture is probably 800 miles from the nearest edge of the range. But as I said above, maybe I'm taking the range maps too literally. I would appreciate feedback from others about the use of range maps. BTW, I am perfectly happy with either outcome. Since I've just started collecting pictures of wildlife, either type of warbler is a new one for me . PS... I appreciate the dialogue. I am learning a lot about bird identification just from this one bird!
    1 point
  10. Agree with Blackpoll Warbler.
    1 point
  11. Bill length looks like a Greater.
    1 point
  12. Very difficult to see, but I'm going to suggest Blue-gray Gnatcatcher based on the long tail, droopy-winged posture, and eyering.
    1 point
  13. I actually saw the bird there this week. It is a shoveler. It's a bad angle there. Here's my pic.
    1 point
  14. My first impression on the last warbler was Nashville as well. What features specifically ruled out Nashville? This picture is from a book called The Warbler Guide. See how it shows Orange-crowned with a solid yellow underside, whereas it shows Nashville's having a mostly yellow underside with a white area around where the legs are. I don't know how reliable this is, but it seemed like something that may have needed to be addressed. I have seen tons of Orange-crowned Warblers here in Mississippi, and although I didn't immediately think OC for this one, an OCWA in Alaska might look quite different than one here, considering the different subspecies that exist. I'm not necessarily disagreeing with the OCWA call, but I also can't 100% agree with it.
    1 point
  15. I'm thinking this is a young male. It seems to have some purple color in its feathers and the streaking is really dense. I don't know when Purple Finches molt into adult plumage, though.
    1 point
  16. pictures taken along gulf coast, Bay St Louis, MS. which is not far from MS LA state line. Can someone confirm one is an Eastern Fox and the other a Sherman's Fox Squirrel IMG_4965a by H W, on Flickr IMG_9728 by H W, on Flickr
    1 point
  17. American Robin American Robin by Johnny, on Flickr American Robin by Johnny, on Flickr
    1 point
  18. Since I'm a complete noob at this, I often start with a whatbird search by location to give me a full list of possibilities. Otherwise, I am afraid I will tunnel vision on the first decent fit I stumble across and miss a better fit (I don't know what I don't know). Nashville Warbler did not come up on this initial search list because Alaska is not in its range. I then look up the birds on the search list in Nat Geo or the Warbler Guide, including reading up on birds they list as similar. While doing this, Nashville came up as a similar bird and got on my candidate list. I couldn't find a good reason to rule it out, but ultimately guessed OC because of range alone. The ebird sightings map shows a few Nashvilles in SE Alaska (out of the range), but I decided the probability was too low. Not sure if I am putting too much stock in the range maps... PS... yes, this is a laborious process. I am probably spending an hour per bird on some of these harder birds and I am going through hundreds and hundreds of pictures from my trip. But I don't feel I have the experience to cut corners and make assumptions. I guess that is why this is called a hobby 🙂. PPS... How the heck did I get a smiley in my original post instead of a capital C? I wonder what strange sequence of keys I hit.
    1 point
  19. _91A3027.jpg by chipperatl2, on Flickr _91A2607.jpg by chipperatl2, on Flickr
    1 point
  20. 1. Gray-breasted Prinia - similar to Ashy but has the darker collar across the breast (I can't find Ashy records for Myanmar on eBird either) 2. Initial thought was some species of spiderhunter or sunbird 3. Yes, domesticated guineafowl 4. Chinese Blackbird I believe 5. Likely another Chinese Blackbird
    1 point
  21. Why isn’t 3 a worn Nashville Warbler. I’m not saying I disagree with OC, it’s just my initial impression was Nashville.
    1 point
  22. That's what says on my beer cozy, and it's so true.
    1 point
  23. Every notice that auto-correct doesn’t work when you need it to, but does when you don’t? That happens to me all too often.
    1 point
  24. Redtail Hawk She nest in my backyard every year Mississippi Kite building a nest across the steet
    1 point
  25. These are my favorite little "winter birds". They hang out under my window and I can hear them peeping and rustling around in the dead leaves.
    1 point
  26. I agree...Downy...no shoulder spur, sharp-pointed bill that is shorter than the length of its head. 🙂
    1 point
  27. Yup, a Pine Siskin...nice capture! 🙂
    1 point
  28. Northern Watersnake by Greg Miller, on Flickr Thirsty Possum by Greg Miller, on Flickr Little Brown Bat by Greg Miller, on Flickr Green Frog by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  29. Here's one from Oregon
    1 point
  30. Looks like a Bare-Backed Rapid Runner to me.
    1 point
  31. Keep your eyes open because there have been sightings recently in Ontario. They are still moving!
    1 point
  32. This year is supposed to be a good one for most irruptive northern birds in eastern North America, according to the forecast. http://jeaniron.ca/2018/wff18.htm Will I finally get my life Common Redpoll?
    1 point
  33. Looks like a Christmas Tree decorated with little Pine Siskin ornaments.
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. Red fox photo I took a while back
    1 point
  36. Black Rat Snake by Greg Miller, on Flickr Eastern Chipmunk by Greg Miller, on Flickr Lifer Bobcat by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
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