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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/12/2018 in Posts

  1. How did this story end? I went down to the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix yesterday. Good birds there, and some let you get a little closer than normal, probably because they like the plants so much. Here's a lifer for me: a Verdin.
    6 points
  2. 6 points
  3. Ruby-crowned Kinglet Ruby-crowned Kinglet by Johnny, on Flickr
    5 points
  4. It amazes me how birds can manage to eat such large fish! Here's another one from the Phoenix Botanical Gardens. It's a Cactus Wren!
    4 points
  5. One is a Red-breasted Nuthatch. Notice facial pattern. Ring-billed for the Gull?
    2 points
  6. I feel the same way as @Melierax. I see the idea, but it’s just not for me. I actually don’t really carry anything around for ID when I’m birding. I very rarely take a field guide with me, unless I’m on a long or far away trip. I have my phone for something if I need it, but I usually don’t. I personally study field guides and other resources at home, rather than in the field.
    2 points
  7. I don't care for this idea. I find field guides extremely useful especially in comparing two bird species so I'm not against paper books. Firstly: I have tons of bird books including Sibley, Stokes, National Geographic, and even some vintage Peterson's and all of them have better illustrations that iBird(which I assume is the idea for this), no offense. Secondly: I also have several smaller pocket-sized guides and they sit on the shelf and I never use them - particularly because it's very easy to bring a regional Sibley that's infinitely better than a tiny pocket book. Also, I feel like most people who bird wear some sort of backpack or something else that holds essentials like a water bottle, a camera, lenses, etc., maybe a snack, in which they could place a Sibley without much discomfort (we're already dealing with discomfort with binoculars and everything else, what's a relatively lightweight field guide gonna do?). I get the idea, but it's just not for me. I'd rather bring a high quality Sibley's.
    2 points
  8. This may be a juvenile Harelquin Duck. The white on the cheeks does seem to vary somewhat on juveniles, this one having more white than typical.
    2 points
  9. Maybe a Black Vulture that had some missing molt feathers. Pretty sure it's too late for Common Nighthawk there now, but they do have white wing patches, except for they are radiating out from the bases of the primaries. Kind of the opposite of what you show here.
    2 points
  10. Agree with Song Sparrow. Swamps are a more orangey-brown and they have fewer, thinner streaks on the breast or they lack the streaks altogether.
    2 points
  11. Golden-crowned Kinglet Golden-crowned Kinglet by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  12. Don't remember the exact title but we had a similar thread on the old forum. Got pictures of common birds that you're proud of then post them here. White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) by Greg Miller, on Flickr American Robin, Celery Farm, Oct. 2012 by Greg Miller, on Flickr Northern Mockingbird by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
  13. Shot this at Bowdoin NWR in MT. The images are greatly cropped. This was a solitary bird. Didn't offer any close photos. thanks for the help.
    1 point
  14. I would greatly appreciate your help with the following. Taken 11/11/18. Coast Guard Station, Jones Beach, NY. Thank you! Please confirm Marbled Godwit (Lifer) Marbled Godwit by Johnny-for ID Purposes, on Flickr Are there any Red Knotts (would be a Lifer) in the 3 pictures below? I ask because others said they were there but I'm not sure if I was able to get them. I think I see Plovers, Dunlin and Sanderlings. #1. Shorebirds TBID by Johnny-for ID Purposes, on Flickr #2. Shorebirds TBID by Johnny-for ID Purposes, on Flickr #3. Shorebirds TBID by Johnny-for ID Purposes, on Flickr
    1 point
  15. Nice! Congrats on the lifer!! Where did you get this one?
    1 point
  16. Thanks, I've been very frustrated by my failure to see one when so many others have seen them. That's also true for many other species, but these birds are resting right in the parking lot, not hopping around in and out of foliage like many of the small birds here.
    1 point
  17. How thick would this book be? Regular guides run about 3/4" to an inch thick for eastern or western, but they have four to six species on each page, front and back. The sample shown uses multiple pages for a single species. This format may result in a book too thick to hold as shown, may weigh more than a conventionally formatted guide, and take an eternity to page through. It better have a heavy-duty spine. Me, I quit carrying guides to the field long ago, printed or electronic. I decided I'd rather spend the time observing birds, taking photos or making notes, and that identifying them could wait until I got home. I can see the format maybe making sense for content that's read only from front to back, but not as a reference. For that kind of serial or consecutive reading, what's the advantage? I can one-hand most paperbacks already.
    1 point
  18. 1) WB Nuthatch 2) Yup 3) Pass 4) Yup, Bonaparte’s
    1 point
  19. 1 point
  20. The gull guy was aberrant.
    1 point
  21. Yep, horned grebes in the first photo.
    1 point
  22. 2. Ring-necked 4. Bonaparte's gull
    1 point
  23. Strikes me as an Indigo Bunting, but wait for experts.
    1 point
  24. If the woodpecker is on a standard sized suet feeder, I would say the bird is too small to be a Hairy Woodpecker. While we can't see the tip of the bill, it still looks more like a small Downy Woodpecker's bill to me. I'm sure someone more competent at IDs will clarify whether this is a Downy or not, and provide more reasons behind the ID.
    1 point
  25. Agree with Red-tailed Hawk.
    1 point
  26. Nice Verdin! I tried for one in Texas, but it just didn't work out this trip. Hopefully next time. The story ended with a full and happy cormorant.
    1 point
  27. Oh, so not near us. Send some Fulvous to SW Michigan OK?
    1 point
  28. Choke canyon state park about an hour south of San Antonio TX. Great spot on a nasty day.
    1 point
  29. It looks a little like a Solitary Sandpiper to me, but it looks like that would be even less likely that Greater Yellowlegs. I’m not sure, but it’s not giving be a Tattler vibe.
    1 point
  30. Black Phoebe Pygmy Nuthatch
    1 point
  31. I'd like to hear what others say, but I personally don't see much value in the idea. The main reason people look in field guides is to get an identificaton. Birders generally would find much more value in images, rather than a description, especially when time is limited in the field. How is an illustration on a tiny page going to accomplish that? What's the best way to get that visual? I don't think that a mini pocket book would be very beneficial in making an ID. The size seems to be the obviously problem, IMO. Why not just use a smartphone app (or even just the internet) that provides an essentially unlimited supply of high quality images at numerous angles, lighting, distances, age, sex, molt condition, abnormal birds, hybrids, subspecies, etc. I don't see how a mini hand-held paper book could provide anything near what an app or even just a Google search, All About Birds, eBird Media/Macaulay, Audubon, etc can. The internet in itself uses no trees 🙂
    1 point
  32. Male Rose-ringed Parakeet seen feeding in a baobab tree:
    1 point
  33. Yellow-rumped Warbler Yellow-rumped Warbler by Johnny, on Flickr
    1 point
  34. On my cross continent drive, I saw and photographed a number of Golden-mantled Ground Squirrels. Most were exactly what you would expect: sleek, agile creatures of nature. However, while walking along Lake Minnewanka in Banff National Park (Alberta) on August 23, I saw an unusual one. To put it as politely as possible... he was a real tubby. I'd never seen a squirrel (of any type) nearly this chubby. As I was trying to understand how he could have gotten this way, he wandered over near me and took a seat. Then I understood..... This squirrel is a couch potato! I was half expecting him to pull out a tiny bag of chips...
    1 point
  35. To bird or not to bird. That is the question.
    1 point
  36. BBC Roseate skimmer 10-24-2018 Roseate skimmer by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  37. Twelve-spotted Skimmer by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr Tiger Swallowtail by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr
    1 point
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