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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/13/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
  2. Had a nice, rare Cattle Egret today. Cattle Egret by Patrick Felker, on Flickr
    3 points
  3. It amazes me how birds can manage to eat such large fish! Here's another one from the Phoenix Botanical Gardens. It's a Cactus Wren!
    3 points
  4. And the tree appears to be some type of maple and not a pine which have needles.
    2 points
  5. To me, it seems most like a Traill's (Alder / Willow) based on the structure (fairly thick bill, less "compact" looking than Least). An eyering is present, but not as strong or thick the whole way around like a lot of Least's. In addition to that, I think a Least can probably be eliminated just because it seems a little too buff / tan-colored. Alder Flycatchers are actually more likely than "western" Willow Flycatchers (extimus, adastus, and brewsteri subspecies - from Birds of North America) to have that sort of eyering. Western Willow Flycatchers often completely lack an eyering, which is useful to tell them apart from other western flycatchers. If those subspecies are the expected WIFL's at the location you birded, I would lean towards Alder... definitely best to separate them by call though.
    2 points
  6. Ruby-crowned Kinglet Ruby-crowned Kinglet by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  7. Yes, a good field mark for WTHA. Now that I have the image on my computer screen instead of a smartphone, is that a white breast patch or are the feathers being blown out by the wind revealing the underside of the feathers?
    1 point
  8. You're asking us for opinions on something we haven't seen, based only on a couple of rough sample images. You asked for opinions. It appears you now have your nose out of joint because no one responded the way you hoped. Like @lonestranger, I'm not likely to bother you again with when you belittle those who don't agree with you.
    1 point
  9. If that's your idea of a joke I fail to see the humour there.... *shakes my head* You can tell Kemosabi that he can take that idea and....(use your imagination) You asked for opinions and then call people luddites because their opinions don't agree with your's? I will keep my opinion to myself from now on and wish you all the best in marketing your silly gimmick to those that are silly enough to buy into it.
    1 point
  10. Shot this at Bowdoin NWR in MT. The images are greatly cropped. This was a solitary bird. Didn't offer any close photos. thanks for the help.
    1 point
  11. Akiley I think this is a really important point: Sibley is the highest selling printed book format field guide, and my personal favorite too. National Geographic is the 2nd best selling field guide printed book. Both sell up to 250,000 copies a year. Each new edition has mostly minor changes but they are still a lot of work to update. The books take totally different design and layout paths. Personally I think each book has great appeal and both are good to own, because of the different views they give of our hobby of ID. But here is an interesting little known fact--these are not the best selling field guide apps. Sibley is the #3 best selling bird app. iBird and Audubon are 1 and 2. In early 2018 National Geographic removed their app from the app store and gave no reason! It could not have been that NG was a poor app, because it wasn't. It worked very well and very much like their book. It may be the cost of app maintenance was too high, or they had some fall out with the 3rd party developer; who knows. My point is the design goals for a field guide app and a printed field guide are really different.
    1 point
  12. Since you are looking for more feedback, I'll offer mine, although I'm not sure it's what you're looking for. Sorry, but I think that flipping the book sideways is a silly gimmick that has no advantage, other than a marketing hook for people that want to have something different than everyone else. Books oriented horizontally can't hold any more information than the same sized book that's oriented vertically, so what's the point? While a field guide with thinner pages and smaller print would have the advantage of potentially holding more data, I see thinner pages as being more fragile and smaller print as being harder to read. The horizontally oriented marketing hook directed at smartphone users might work, but I suspect that the smartphone users that prefer reading from their phone instead of a book would rather read from their phone than a book regardless of the books orientation. I took my camera's user's manual, which is just slightly bigger than the size you mentioned, and turned it horizontally to try and flip pages and get a feel for the different orientation. It felt weird and awkward holding it that way with one hand and it felt even weirder flipping the pages upwards, my fingers and thumbs just aren't used to turning pages that way. I think the idea of a small field guide with lots of info is a great idea, if it's durable and readable. I think the idea of making such a book and flipping it horizontally is a silly gimmick that would turn more people away than it lures in. I can only speak for myself but the horizontal orientation would be a big turn off for me. Sorry, but you asked what I thought and the simple answer is, not much at all.
    1 point
  13. Seconded. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruby-crowned_Kinglet
    1 point
  14. That many carcasses makes me think of avian botulism.
    1 point
  15. Looks good for Ruby-throated based on looks and location.
    1 point
  16. I'm sure there are some fine birders on the forum. I wasn't trying to insinuate otherwise. Folks come and go, but these (02) were really good at not only IDing the birds, but explaining why. It makes it easier for the ones asking for an ID to later ID them on their own later. I'm Creeker understands what I am talking about. And yes, Psweet has helpful as well. I wish I had more time to spend on this forum.
    1 point
  17. Compare with this bird: https://www.hbw.com/ibc/photo/yellow-headed-blackbird-xanthocephalus-xanthocephalus/unusually-marked-leucistic-male
    1 point
  18. No age or sex of YHBL should normally show yellowish coloring all the way down the belly, seeming to reach the undertail coverts.
    1 point
  19. Is it just me or does this bird look really off structurally for YH Blackbird? It’s shape looks really odd, chunky and short-tailed. That bill is troubling me also. If this bird didn’t have a yellow head and breast, YB Blackbird wouldn’t be the first thing that came to mind...
    1 point
  20. The pink beak and pink legs is puzzling, but I don't know what else it would be! Strange looking critter for sure!!
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. Side note: is that your picture of a Common Nighthawk in Birdwatching magazine? Just happened across it a few minutes ago.
    1 point
  23. Burke County, GA! First ever for the county. It wasn't my find. Liam sent me a text. He was with another birder who spotted it.
    1 point
  24. Nice! Congrats on the lifer!! Where did you get this one?
    1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. Yes, Marbled Godwits- congrats! Yes, you have Red Knots and Dunlin in there in both photos. Black-bellied Plover and Dunlin.
    1 point
  27. That might have been psweet. He hasn't been on in a month or so. But he is amazing at gulls and an all-around bird genius. There are other really sharp birders on here as well. If I start naming names I will inevitably leave somebody out.
    1 point
  28. How did this story end? I went down to the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix yesterday. Good birds there, and some let you get a little closer than normal, probably because they like the plants so much. Here's a lifer for me: a Verdin.
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. Blue Jay by Greg Miller, on Flickr European Starling by Greg Miller, on Flickr Black-capped Chickadee by Greg Miller, on Flickr Mourning Dove by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
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