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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/15/2018 in all areas

  1. Carolina Wren. Dearborn, MI. 11/14/2018
    6 points
  2. Had a nice, rare Cattle Egret today. Cattle Egret by Patrick Felker, on Flickr
    3 points
  3. Greater Yellowlegs and a Spotted Sandpiper in the back.
    2 points
  4. So this little goose has a lot of frequent flyer miles! It's from Ushakovskoye, Chukotskiy Avtonomnyy Okrug, Russia (north and west of Alaska). It's a male and was hatched in 2016 or earlier. It's probably gone back and forth since it was hatched. You really can't underestimate the stamina of birds - they go thru a lot to survive. I hope the hunters are bad shots and he makes the trip back.
    2 points
  5. That is a Spotted Sandpiper.
    2 points
  6. Nuttall’s Woodpecker.
    2 points
  7. There might be a mix in here. In general, they're super hard to ID in flight. Lessers have a peak in front and in back in flight, whereas Greaters have a smooth transition from the front beak to the neck. In addition, Greaters have more white than Lessers. Based on these criteria, I think the bottom two in the first photo might be Greaters while the rest are Lessers. I could be wrong though.
    1 point
  8. Much appreciated, so I guess it is the lighting. Edit for Bird Nuts. Too long ago for my memory and I was concentrating on the Yellowlegs.
    1 point
  9. The bird in front is a Yellowlegs, but I'm having trouble deciding which one it is. I'm going to guess Spotted Sandpiper for the bird in the background because of the orange beak and light supercilium. Was it bobbing its tail up and down? That would have been a good clue. EDIT: akiley beat me!
    1 point
  10. Most of us here are going to encourage you to feed birds! You can get an inexpensive plastic feeder and black oil sunflower seed at most 'Big Box' stores. Black oil sunflower is preferred by most species of birds you'll attract to at a back yard feeder, including your House Finch. You could hang it from an unused hook on your porch. That will discourage squirrels from eating the seed, although you'll have to sweep the empty seed hulls off the porch. You could also hang it from a tree branch or pole in the yard; less mess but more available to squirrels. Everything's a trade-off If you decide to not feed them, they'll be fine. Just as they got along for centuries without artificial heat sources, they got along living on the native food sources available without people feeding them.
    1 point
  11. Looks good to me, with that thicker bill.
    1 point
  12. With the dark eyes and thick but not long toes, I would call both young Red-shouldered Hawks.
    1 point
  13. Welcome to Whatbird! Just a side note- it's always good to mention location in posts.
    1 point
  14. Creeker and TooFly, thanks for the input. Very much appreciated!!!!!
    1 point
  15. I agree with Spotted Sandpiper.
    1 point
  16. A first-winter bird. Note the bit of retained juvenal barring on the wing coverts.
    1 point
  17. First pic shows the "hockey stick " wingbars nicely.
    1 point
  18. It looks like a Nuttall's Woodpecker.
    1 point
  19. Nice! Congrats on the lifer!! Where did you get this one?
    1 point
  20. Ruby-crowned Kinglet Ruby-crowned Kinglet by Johnny, on Flickr
    1 point
  21. It amazes me how birds can manage to eat such large fish! Here's another one from the Phoenix Botanical Gardens. It's a Cactus Wren!
    1 point
  22. Another sparrow ID that I am fairly certain of, but just wanted to make sure. This was taken on 04/24/16 in Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge. I am seeing a Lark Sparrow, but is a slightly little different than what I saw in UT, but that just may be angle. I have only seen one, so my reference numbers are pretty limited.
    1 point
  23. Sounds like a Pine Siskin. Just so you know, goldfinches often give their "flight call" when they are perched.
    1 point
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