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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/16/2018 in all areas

  1. Then we'd be updating the maps all the time. It's time to stop this undisciplined wandering. It's too late to hope for any conformity from the existing birds; they're all a bunch of unprincipled Millennials. Our only hope for future birding is to properly indoctrinate future generations. Gotta nip it in the bud. Show a bird a map and he'll stay in his range for a day. Give a bird a map and he'll stay there the rest of his life.
    3 points
  2. One at a time now!
    3 points
  3. I'm funding a Kickstarter to provide iBird to all of 2019's fledglings, juveniles, immatures, and young gulls up through their 2nd year plumage, so they'll know what their ranges are. Maybe then they'll stay where they're supposed to be.
    2 points
  4. I personally don't feel as if the whole app market has taken over birding. My go to when I need to review empid/gull/other tricky ids would be a printed out guide. NatGeo was the first field guide I owned, and I picked up quite a bit from how they formatted that, and I would most certainly recommend people get a printed field guide when they start birding. I think part of the problem with me not being all that interested in the product would be because I have numerous field guides from all over as is, I am accustomed to using them, and they are all greatly detailed and allow for interspecies comparison.
    2 points
  5. They are juvi's . . . they don't know what their range is yet! Jerry Manassas VA
    2 points
  6. I found a couple of snow geese today
    2 points
  7. This one has been baffling me. Probably a juvenile something-or-other, but Nat Geo seems pretty useless for juvenile ducks. I've attached several pictures. These were taken on three different days (late Aug), so they may not be the same bird or even type of bird. But they were all taken in the same small pond in Banff NP. Merlin says Ring-necked, with Redhead and Ruddy as alternatives. My confusion: Ring-necked: Head shape looks good (peaked) in a couple of pictures and the bill shape seems OK. However, Ring-necked are supposed to have a white eyering, a white band behind the bill and a white stripe and black tip on the bill. I see a hint of white behind the bill. But no eyering and the bill coloring seems off. Redhead: Redhead bills look more scooped than my pictures. Redhead has a black tip on the bill that is missing here. Redhead is medium brown, these seem darker. Ruddy Duck: Out of range (but not too far). Ruddy bills look more scooped than my pictures. Ruddy's dark cap extends down and includes the eyes. On these ducks, the eye is below the cap. Scaup?: Not on the Merlin list, but the head and bill shape look pretty good. However, I can't find any scaup pictures with this much white spread across the face. Bufflehead? Bill looks too big. I think Ring-necked is the best fit, but the missing white stripe on the bill and missing eyering are bothering me. Appreciate any help, thanks in advance! PS. OK, I realize I did not discover a new species. But if I had, would I get to name it? If so, I would call it "Shootmenow". 😁 8/26: 8/27: 8/29: Maybe not too much help, but I like the picture.
    1 point
  8. Rosette Spoonbill
    1 point
  9. Yes the second is a Grackle. I think Great-tailed would be more expected there over Boat-tailed as they are more of strictly coastal bird.
    1 point
  10. [sarcasm] Bunch a European immigrants. House Sparrows too. Obviously can't be trusted to stay where they belong; they got here, didn't they? [\sarcacm]
    1 point
  11. Looks like a Black-capped to me.
    1 point
  12. Where were you at? That would help. But if I had to guess, take a look at Juvenile Black Crowned Night Heron for #1 and eastern Pheobe for #2. Not sure if they’re in your range.
    1 point
  13. You are so right. The other day I found images of a California Condor and Wood Stork, plus others, in vacation photos from years ago. I am going to do some more digging.
    1 point
  14. If I was looking for a Brown Thrasher, I'd also check down on the ground. They may not call from there but that's where they feed, actively foraging through the leaves and other debris.
    1 point
  15. Lazuli Bunting. πŸ™‚
    1 point
  16. I agree with all. The 3rd photo has light colored legs which points to least.
    1 point
  17. Probably a Glaucous, but I don't know if some Herring Gull influence can be ruled out here.
    1 point
  18. I'm having trouble seen the pics in that album, despite having a Facebook account. I can only see the tiny thumbnails on my phone here. From what I can tell, looks like (L to R) Sanderling, Semipalmated Sandpiper, and Least Sandpiper.
    1 point
  19. We had a pretty bad ice storm today and the bird feeder is covered in ice. I did get a little better picture tonight though.
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. I agree with Black-bellied. Cool photo!
    1 point
  22. That works both ways, though; one of the biggest downsides to electronic books and apps, in my opion, is that they can't be loaned, sold, or given away.
    1 point
  23. Most of us here are going to encourage you to feed birds! You can get an inexpensive plastic feeder and black oil sunflower seed at most 'Big Box' stores. Black oil sunflower is preferred by most species of birds you'll attract to at a back yard feeder, including your House Finch. You could hang it from an unused hook on your porch. That will discourage squirrels from eating the seed, although you'll have to sweep the empty seed hulls off the porch. You could also hang it from a tree branch or pole in the yard; less mess but more available to squirrels. Everything's a trade-off If you decide to not feed them, they'll be fine. Just as they got along for centuries without artificial heat sources, they got along living on the native food sources available without people feeding them.
    1 point
  24. Alright here's my take, as a teen birder: I honestly just don't see the value here. I have never heard of "minibooks" before this, and I will likely never buy one. I see no problem with just getting a paper/hardcover and plopping down somewhere to read for a few hours. I don't need to feel like I'm swiping through an Instagram feed to read. I rarely take a field guide into the birding with me as is, and really haven't since I started birding. I never used one of those "pocket-sized field guides" just because they did not have the detail that I could get within a Sibley or NatGeo. I'm just trying to imagine something with even smaller font/images. When I started birding in mid-2015, my NatGeo proved to be a very useful guide, as I could see similar species and compare the two on one page. It seems to me that in a "minibook" that this would not be possible, just due to the tiny page size. With the smaller page size too, I think that many of the illustrations would lose much detail, with many of the key identifying features being harder to see/not visible at all. I honestly don't see the problem with a phone either. Granted, they do have battery life (which I just pack a good portable charger for), but the cellular issue can be fixed fairly easily by downloading packs and whatnot for offline usage. The advantage about the field guides on a phone too (I only have Merlin), is that they offer birds in multiple natural positions, as well as a variety of sounds. To me, there really would be no need for a minibook field guide. I'd much rather save my money for something I'd actually use. PS: The demo image technically violates forum rules, the words second from top left and somewhere in the middle on the bottom page seem to be a bit expletive.
    1 point
  25. I agree with the above responses. I would like to add to Aveschapines' response and say that I think this is a fad. Being a 16 year old birder who I would say is well versed in modern culture, this idea is not going to take off. You say this should appeal to young people who have their faces stuck in their phones - I say quite the opposite. I am part of the online teen culture of birding and they would not like this idea, even new birders. They prefer online websites like birds of north america, all about birds, and now eBird (new explore species feature), even when in the field. When the internet is out or people want better comparisons, they use a normal field guide and at that point it would be pointless to have a smaller guide. (It's pretty much a miniature meme that young birders don't like iBird (mainly because of the illustrations)). In an online world where the culture can change within a month, week, even a day, this will fall by the wayside as just another fad. People like simple, ordinary, and practical. I think someone might buy it just for the idea, but then realize that it's hard to use in the field and, as Aves said, does not withstand the heavy use that comes with birding. At first I thought you posted this to see what we thought about the idea in order to decide whether or not this should be put into production. But it seems you showed up with preconceived notions as to what the response was going to be, and now you're disappointed it's not what you had hoped. Since birders like the people on this forum are your audience, I suggest you take into account their responses instead of throwing them aside simply because they don't look positively on the idea. True, we're just a small sample of people, but we essentially represent your audience. Not trying to be rude, but I think you're just looking for affirmation and anything other than that is just something to be argued away without full consideration. But it's not your opinion that matters - it's the consumers'. If people see a product like this on the market, this is the response people will give. Since the consumers on this website are obviously looking on this idea negatively, I think you should reconsider putting this into production unless you want to risk it on the few people who buy it once and never recommend it to anyone else. You say that other people have already made up their minds, and that if people are worried about a negative response, they should "simply not respond". So far you've posted already having made up your mind (complete with articles and other facts that argue your idea), and with all the negative responses you've replied with "this may not be the best place to ask my question", indicating you're choosing ignoring the opinions simply because they don't agree with yours. But it doesn't matter how stupid the consumers' opinion is - it's the opinion that dictates whether or not this will be a success. You can't change the minds of your entire audience unless you have a highly skilled advertisement company and a lot of money, at which point it might have been better to simply forget about the idea. If you don't believe me, I can post this topic to all 60 or so young birders, many of them new, on discord and ask their opinion. I'd be glad to and it'd hopefully be good info for you. I wish you the best of luck.
    1 point
  26. You're asking us for opinions on something we haven't seen, based only on a couple of rough sample images. You asked for opinions. It appears you now have your nose out of joint because no one responded the way you hoped. Like @lonestranger, I'm not likely to bother you again with when you belittle those who don't agree with you.
    1 point
  27. Had a nice, rare Cattle Egret today. Cattle Egret by Patrick Felker, on Flickr
    1 point
  28. Nice Verdin! I tried for one in Texas, but it just didn't work out this trip. Hopefully next time. The story ended with a full and happy cormorant.
    1 point
  29. This is the planet Mars rising over Devils Tower (taken July 17, 2018). In planning my cross continent drive, I realized I would be near Devils Tower National Monument very close to a new moon. I had never tried my hand at astrophotography (hell, I'm brand new to photography period). But I found an excellent web site with lots of advice and instruction. I researched locations in the monument that would align the tower with the Milky Way, set up my tripod and folding chair and gave it a try. I didn't know Mars would be in the sky, but quickly figured it out when I saw it (star tracking app on my phone). Since I had not had a chance to try this even once before I showed up at Devils Tower, I spent a couple of hours taking lots of pictures. Because of the large amount of post-processing needed, I could not get real time feedback so I followed a plan that systematically took me through a wide range of settings. I had no way to know if any of them were going to be worth a damn until a couple months later when I got home and worked on them. This particular photograph is five 15 second exposures at f/2.4 and ISO 4000 stacked using Adobe Lightroom. I had to post process it twice, once to optimize the Milky Way (which makes Mars an overexposed blob) and then again to optimize Mars (which leaves the Milky Way underexposed). I then had to paste optimized Mars over blob Mars. Lots of specialized techniques involved, but the web site allowed a complete novice to get a decent result. /Edit: looks like uploading degraded the picture a bit. But you get the idea πŸ˜‰.
    1 point
  30. Hawk Aransas NWR 10-18 IMG_9812_rsz by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  31. Redtail Hawk She nest in my backyard every year Mississippi Kite building a nest across the steet
    1 point
  32. Mermet Wildlife Area, Il I waited an hour for him to come off the tree
    1 point
  33. Brown Pelican Texas Coast Brown Pelican Anahauc NWR 10-17 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  34. I'm not sure this kingfisher is exactly "flying". More like "dive bombing" πŸ˜€. A fish is about to have a bad day... (Taken at Fish Creek in Tongass National Forest, Alaska on August 2, 2018)
    1 point
  35. I've got a large Elderberry shrub out back and when those berries ripen in mid/late August it's like the last hurrah for summer here. Lots of Robins, Mockingbirds, Catbirds, and Orioles until they strip the shrub bare; then they're gone. Right now I have a big patch of ripening sunflowers and other perennials that attracts the goldfinches non-stop. Today there was a pretty orange-ish cardinal that I haven't noticed before. Some grosbeaks would be awesome but very unlikely - have seen them only once, a pair of Rose-breasted, in the spring, years ago.... She's got a cool hairdo too..
    1 point
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