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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/21/2018 in all areas

  1. The head is angled slightly away from us, making the beak look shorter than it actually is. The shoulder spur looks to be obscured by the angle and fluffy breast feathers. Clean white outer tail feathers are another mark for Hairy.
    3 points
  2. Harris' Hawk by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    3 points
  3. Looks to be a juvenile mourning dove.
    2 points
  4. Mark5. Really appreciate your response as I had been a little nervous about asking the question here (I checked the forum rules first but still wondered if I was crossing a line). I had looked for an eBird community forum but only found, other than Facebook, direct e-mail contact with eBird. It looked like I would not get a response here so I sent them an e-mail. Kathi responded last night acknowledging the backlog and was kind enough to review the thirteen outstanding observations, all basically accepted subject to the actual review. It was actually less frustration and more of a concern that, as a beginner, I had missed a step for "rare" observation submissions. Thanks again. Charlie. I normally completely agree with your postings but I have to suggest there is a third category. I started to enjoy birds and photography (a variety of subjects) more than sixty years ago when I was around ten. I probably have some black and white photos in a box of Blackbirds and Blue Tits taken with a Kodak Brownie. Continued to enjoy both on a low key basis over the years but got more serious a couple of years ago. I am always trying to get a better image (pose, setting etc.) than the last one but also find the images invaluable for ID on my desktop (is there an app like Merlin which works on a desktop?). I've attached an image from a couple of mornings ago taken in the local harbor. All the best.
    2 points
  5. All About Birds says, "Red-shouldered Hawks eat mostly small mammals, lizards, snakes, and amphibians" so unless you had very small cat, there are likely other causes for the disappearance. I hope you find it. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-shouldered_Hawk/lifehistory If you'd like to learn more about birding, there's an Audubon chapter in your area. http://www.capefearaudubon.org/index_next2.html
    2 points
  6. Welcome to Whatbird! I'm sorry to hear about your cat. I'm not sure this hawk is big enough to go for a cat, but who knows. The orange and white barred breast and belly combined with the black and white pattern in the wings and the black tail with thin white bands makes this an adult Red-shouldered Hawk. Yours also shows its reddish shoulder patch! Looks like you got a great view of this magnificent bird.
    2 points
  7. I'm going with red tailed hawk with those white scapular markings
    2 points
  8. I just recently had an Ebird reviewer ask me to change an ID from almost exactly 3 months ago. These folks are volunteers and review observations when they have time. Don't get frustrated. Life happens. Just take it in stride.
    2 points
  9. I do see some yellowish coloring to the primaries, but that's not atypical. This bird looks like it has some weird molting/worn pattern going on. Note the facial pattern for Purple. And the bill does look a little thick, but the culmen looks straight. An odd bird, but definitely a Purple.
    2 points
  10. I'd go with Purple Finch as well. I hesitated when I saw the yellow in the wings, but remembered that some (young ones, I believe) tend to be quite yellow. Like this: https://www.hbw.com/sites/default/files/styles/ibc_1k/public/ibc/p/Purple_Finch_female_7819.jpg?itok=nNcPLq7M
    2 points
  11. I'll see your Cowbird and raise you a Cattle Egret.
    2 points
  12. Ruby-crowned Kinglet Ruby-crowned Kinglet by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  13. I would rather do my own root canal with a pair of Vice-Grips, a Dremel tool, and a bottle of Jack Daniels*. I run a fantasy NASCAR league nine months out of the year; that's close enough for me. Call me when I retire in six or seven years and have the time to do the job properly. * Available combined in our convenient 'Root Canal Gift Pack', with birthday or holiday packaging. No stamps, please. Five or ten cent deposit required where applicable.
    1 point
  14. I think I'll let this one speak for itself...
    1 point
  15. Yes I didn't hear "bad idea" but rather "not for me".
    1 point
  16. Whoops, didn't notice the hawk at the top left of the first photo. That is a Cooper's Hawk.
    1 point
  17. 1-2. Red-shouldered Hawk 3. American Crow and Northern Harrier
    1 point
  18. Looks like a brown headed cowbird
    1 point
  19. You have got a red-shoulder hawk. Unlikely that it ate your cat but stranger things have happened! Welcome to Whatbird
    1 point
  20. If you think it's a Pine Warbler, then we're either both right or both wrong together. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pine_Warbler/ EDIT: on second thought, I'm not sure about the facial markings. Forget I said anything.
    1 point
  21. Agreed. Saw plenty when I visited the Grand Canyon two summers ago.
    1 point
  22. Yes, I've seen them, and that's one.😉
    1 point
  23. I have a theory about two kinds of people you'll bump into when birding and on forums. There are birders who to take photos as an ID tool, and photographers who have chosen birds as their subject.
    1 point
  24. I can't argue with you when you're right. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Juniper_Titmouse/
    1 point
  25. I'm going with Pygmy Nuthatch based on photo and range, but wait for confirmation from someone who's actually seen one. If someone agrees, you might check this: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pygmy_Nuthatch/
    1 point
  26. Seconded. Too much color variation for American, too streaky and neck too long for Least, and Bitterns are rarely that far out in the open. Check the juvenile photos: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green_Heron/id
    1 point
  27. "um , wanna go to the prom with me?" Eastern Gray Squirrel
    1 point
  28. Pygmy Nuthatch. 🙂
    1 point
  29. The bird in that photo is actually the western subspecies. Here's a checklist where I did an analysis on PUFI subspecies. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S31860706 The overall coloring on the wings of the OP's bird does look a bit like the western ssp californicis, but we can't even begin to make any claim from just this pic. It's a Purple nonetheless.
    1 point
  30. I usually bow to @akiley, but is the beak heavy enough? I'd swear I see yellow on the outer primaries, but I guess that could just be a photographic illusion.
    1 point
  31. I felt the same way until I brought up a confirmed photo of a Downy. Now I don't feel that way any more.
    1 point
  32. Thanks for the tip on molting timing. Late last week when I was working on the Ring-necked ducklings that I ended up posting in this forum, I decided to subscribe to the Cornell Birds of NA website (which didn't help me identify the duck 🙄). This morning, I spent time on that site reading about dowitchers. But there is so much information and some of it is still greek to me. I missed the difference in timing on molting. Looking back at the molting graphs, I think I see your point. I suppose it's possible that a short-billed would be molting by this picture, but it seems pretty unlikely it would be far along. The long-billed molting period is much shorter/quicker.
    1 point
  33. But welcome anyway! The escaped cattle cannot be counted toward your life list.
    1 point
  34. Ford and Jobs were introducing what were basically completely new products. This strikes me as a hybrid of two existing tools, or the resizing of one tool into the dimensions of another.
    1 point
  35. Yes, Marbled Godwits. All of the dows look like Long-billed. Maybe the small bird in flight could be a SB, but note how these birds are all largely in winter plumage at this date. SB molt much later, meaning they retain breeding or juvenal plumage later into the fall. SB is a possibility, but not sure here.
    1 point
  36. It's a RAW file and I was able to open it with RawTherapee on my PC. The bird is indeed a Vesper Sparrow.
    1 point
  37. White Ibis with crayfish White Ibis with Lunch by midgetinvasion, on Flickr
    1 point
  38. BBC Costa's Hummingbird,11-18-2018 Avondale, Az. Costa's Hummingbird by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  39. This is the planet Mars rising over Devils Tower (taken July 17, 2018). In planning my cross continent drive, I realized I would be near Devils Tower National Monument very close to a new moon. I had never tried my hand at astrophotography (hell, I'm brand new to photography period). But I found an excellent web site with lots of advice and instruction. I researched locations in the monument that would align the tower with the Milky Way, set up my tripod and folding chair and gave it a try. I didn't know Mars would be in the sky, but quickly figured it out when I saw it (star tracking app on my phone). Since I had not had a chance to try this even once before I showed up at Devils Tower, I spent a couple of hours taking lots of pictures. Because of the large amount of post-processing needed, I could not get real time feedback so I followed a plan that systematically took me through a wide range of settings. I had no way to know if any of them were going to be worth a damn until a couple months later when I got home and worked on them. This particular photograph is five 15 second exposures at f/2.4 and ISO 4000 stacked using Adobe Lightroom. I had to post process it twice, once to optimize the Milky Way (which makes Mars an overexposed blob) and then again to optimize Mars (which leaves the Milky Way underexposed). I then had to paste optimized Mars over blob Mars. Lots of specialized techniques involved, but the web site allowed a complete novice to get a decent result. /Edit: looks like uploading degraded the picture a bit. But you get the idea 😉.
    1 point
  40. We are now hand-feeding 20+ chickadees, 3 WB Nuthatches, and a couple Downies regularly, and the occasional Am. Goldfinch, RB Nuthatch, and Tufted Titmouse. I'm trying to figure out if it's a good thing or not...it's very difficult to get away from all these birds begging for food! 😬 Here are Melinda the nuthatch and Dorothy the Downy.
    1 point
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