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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/06/2018 in all areas

  1. Female(left) and male(right) Pileated Woodpeckers. IMG_3533 by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    5 points
  2. Female(left) and male(right) Baltimore Orioles. Untitled by lonestranger102, on Flickr Female(left) and male(right) Ring-necked Ducks. Untitled by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    5 points
  3. Mallards Mallard pair by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers Yellow-bellied Sapsucker pair by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr
    4 points
  4. Wonderful examples so far. I like how the male Rose-winged Parakeet looks like it has a a goatee. Here's a female and male Gambel's Quail:
    4 points
  5. Female Rose-breasted Grosbeaks (left and right) and Purple Finch (middle).
    3 points
  6. Eastern Bluebirds having a mealworm feast in West Chester, PA yesterday. Since they are partially hidden in the shot with both birds, I've attached a couple of pictures of singles.
    3 points
  7. While both male and female Trumpeter Swans are similar and not considered sexually dimorphic, sometimes it's pretty easy to tell them apart. Untitled by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    3 points
  8. 3 points
  9. Male(left) and female(right) Common Redpolls. Untitled by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    2 points
  10. Male and female Northern Flickers:
    2 points
  11. This was here before. Post a photo with both species of a similar type, like Greater and Lesser Scaup, Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers, etc. Cooper's Hawk (left), and Sharp-shinned Hawk (right):
    1 point
  12. picture taken today in my yard, S/W MS gulf coast Slate-colored adult male? IMG_4284 by H W, on Flickr IMG_4261 by H W, on Flickr
    1 point
  13. Triplets Before And After Here is our local matriarch very pregnant last May. I believe this doe is 6, and responsible for at least 10 more deer to the local herd. This matriarch keeps the herd healthy and smart. Some of her offspring are very respectable bucks. She had been having twins for at least three years in a row prior to this year. This year, she had triplets. The first time we saw her with the triplets in early June Late June, note the darker larger one in the middle. Later in the year you can see the developing antlers on this "button" buck. The other two are does. July - Note the doe trying for a red wing black bird in the second shot *(not unheard of), and she was very gaunt looking after giving birth to three. I didn't see if she got it or not because my attention was on the camera. They went into the taller grass behind them after this shot so I couldn't tell, but at the time I took the shot, I wasn't even thinking about the bird. It was later that I noticed her mouth open and then researched this and found that they have been none to eat small animals and birds when their body needs the protein. August This is a recent shot of them taken on 11/2. Note the larger fawn behind her. It's a button buck. The other two look like does. She was very gaunt looking right after giving birth to these three but she has put on a bunch of weight and now looks ready for another winter. A nine and ten point had both been chasing her late Oct. She is now probably pregnant with another batch. Here are the two different bucks , a nine point and a ten point, that were both chasing her in late Oct during the rut. We watched these two all summer in the food plots I put in for them. That was this year, but lets back up the story one year. My most memorable Marty Stauffer moment, by far, happened the year before in May of '16. I had filled my coffee cup and was going to go downstairs to my man cave , but decided to look out the back window of our home first to see if the turkeys were coming out of the woods yet and making their way toward the bird feeders. (They're the clean up crew and it's a daily occurrence). Imagine my surprise when I saw two twin bucks, just starting to grow their antlers looking at me in the window watching them. They would look at me and then turn their heads and look to the west. This went on for about 5 minutes, and I assumed they were looking at other deer that may be headed their way. I shifted my position and looked out the window in the direction they had been looking and was amazed at what I was saw. It was their mom having another set of twins right in our back yard. I woke my wife and we watched with our mouths hanging open, as to what we were seeing. While she was licking them clean, her twins from the prior year were watching from about 50 feet away. After about 20 minutes, the young bucks came in to check out the new additions to the herd. Had these two not been her prior offspring, she would not have let them near the newborns, but she allowed them to sniff them. We had watched them all winter and spring, so we knew they were hers. There is no mistaking her with any of the other does, as she is a head taller than all of the other deer she hangs with, including some very nice sized bucks. Big doe. Our three corgis were wanting to go out and do their morning routine but we made them wait as we did not want to interrupt what we were witnessing. It took about 40 minutes before she ushered them off to the woods, and all the while they were aware of our presence watching them from the window of our home. We were apparently not enough of a threat for them to run off. So awesome to have seen this. I just wish I had been shooting with the Canon SX 60 I bought last spring instead of the SX 12 which is a very cheap camera. That is why I know this deer so well. We see her almost daily with her 3 fawns as they use the food plots I put in for the deer. Lots of sweet clover varieties they love with some other perennials they like. I love watching them. This doe is huge and stands a head taller than the mature bucks we've seen her with. She survives 3 months of hunting in Michigan and teaches her offspring this knowledge and that keeps the herd healthy and smart. One of her two twin bucks from the prior year photo bombing this shot. The other one is just out of the shot on the right. Ushering them into the woods.
    1 point
  14. Doesn't fit anything else I know, so I'd say it looks fine for a young male.
    1 point
  15. @Charlie Spencer I think PV-John was referring to Whatbird's ID search engine, https://identify.whatbird.com/mwg/_/0/attrs.aspx and not the forums specifically when he mentioned the absence of the Golden-cheeked Woodpecker.
    1 point
  16. Male and female Evening Grosbeaks with the 2 females in the middle. While I see them almost yearly when I travel up north, I don't think I have seen Evening Grosbeaks at my feeders since I took this photo back in 2012...until today when a single female showed up on our platform feeder for some sunflower seeds. Untitled by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    1 point
  17. Try going through this list with the pictures and find what fits the best and see if you recognize any of the names https://ebird.org/region/US-MN/media?yr=cur&m=
    1 point
  18. Thanks! For some unknown reason I just -assumed- PUMA wouldn't get that far north, and I didn't even bother to check the range maps.
    1 point
  19. I believe it is a Plain-capped Starthroat.
    1 point
  20. Yeah the bill is slightly overgrown, but everything else fits fine for Blue Grosbeak.
    1 point
  21. You didn't mention what time of year this sighting occurred...Spring, Summer, June, August...it might be helpful to know that information too. 🙂 What about a juvenile European Starling...they are a drab gray and in my experience with them, they will eat almost anything.
    1 point
  22. Thanks egosnell, not what I was expecting; they are quite different from the adults (not unusual of course but the juveniles seem much stubbier). However the grey collar on the bird on the right is quite distinctive along with the breast streaks. Easy when you know the answer. Thanks again.
    1 point
  23. So close..! Juvenile Purple Martins.
    1 point
  24. There is a sister website to AllAboutBirds also run by Cornell called neotropical birds, here's the link for GCHW: https://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/Species-Account/nb/species/gocwoo1/overview
    1 point
  25. Did you maybe mean in hiding on AllAboutBirds? If so, that site sticks pretty much to the US and Canada. Golden-Cheeked do have a listing on eBird: https://ebird.org/species/gocwoo1
    1 point
  26. What do you mean? As in there's no profile page for it? It's a Mexican an endemic (one of my favourites from my trip!), so that would be why.
    1 point
  27. This con artist pretended to inspect my lighting fixtures and garage door openers for code violations. I suspect he was looking for warm, dry, and free accommodation for the night!
    1 point
  28. Well, I don't see any orange, blue, or green. Of course, that could be due to the light. Assuming those colors aren't present, Northern Rough-Winged Swallows have streaky upper breasts. Definitely wait for someone who knows what they're doing.
    1 point
  29. Blue grosbeak female or immature ?
    1 point
  30. Agree with male here... not all are the solid gray portrayed in guides. Also it could be a younger male in the process of transitioning to adult plumage.
    1 point
  31. Welcome to Whatbird, Getchell. If the bird sings every morning, I suggest getting a recording and posting it for the experts to listen to. As you can see by the variety of suggestions so far, a written description of a bird song is hard to nail down, a recording on the other hand makes an ID much easier for the experts.
    1 point
  32. Royal Terns on New Smyna Beach today.
    1 point
  33. Barn Swallows: Female, left, male, right
    1 point
  34. I think it's a male because of the solid black primaries and gray tones.
    1 point
  35. This wing pattern is called check or checker. Wing patterns can be a much darker check, called a t pattern which is almost black, to this lighter check pattern(sometimes even lighter) to the wild type(2 bars across the lower shield of the wing, to a barless(no pattern on the shield). This is also in order of dominance, from most dominant to most recessive. In addition to pattern, there are three color families...ash red, blue(wild type) and brown, again in order of dominance.
    1 point
  36. Great Egret in Anastasia State Park, St. Augustine FL today.
    1 point
  37. Grizzly....... Teton National Park, Wyoming VACATION....July 2009 044 by littlebear_elder, on Flickr
    1 point
  38. It ain't over til the fat squirrel sings!!
    1 point
  39. I took this picture on an alpine trail off of the Icefields Parkway in Alberta. I was surprised to discover Canadian ground squirrels sing opera. I've never seen a squirrel in the states singing, not even country. It was pretty windy out, but I could have sworn it was singing "O Sole Mio".
    1 point
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