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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/08/2018 in all areas

  1. Juvenile Yellow crowned Night Heron anahauc NWR 7-18 Juvenile Yellow crowned Night Heron anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    4 points
  2. That looks promising, thank you! The beak was thin and it definitely wasn't a wood stork. I'll run it by my friend and see if he agrees. In the meantime I think I'll head out today and see if I can see them again. Any excuse to spend time there is a good excuse (but who needs an excuse!)
    3 points
  3. Turtle Yoga? by hbvol50, on Flickr Maybe "upward-facing reptile"?
    3 points
  4. Had a nice Great Black Hawk today in Portland, Maine. Great Black Hawk by Patrick Felker, on Flickr
    2 points
  5. My latest bird painting (acrylics).
    2 points
  6. This Varied Thrush just decided to go off the beaten path by Swift Current SK. Not likely to ever happen again.
    2 points
  7. 2 points
  8. This wren was seen north of Belle Plaine, SK in August 2018. It’s either a little scruffy or young? The bill looks long and straight. The pictures are a little greyer in cast but the wren wasn’t a dark brown either. The habitat was compatible to sedge. No pines/evergreens. Do you consider the tail too long for a Sedge Wren?
    1 point
  9. BBC Photo taken 12-8-2018 at Selleh Park, Tempe, Arizona. It's a Ringed Teal normally seen in the Central South America Forests (Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, and Uruguay) Ringed Teal by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  10. Wow, that's amazing!
    1 point
  11. With that bill, I'd call it a Dunlin.
    1 point
  12. Awesome, thanks!!!! That's a lifer for me. It only took me three months to realize it!
    1 point
  13. Welcome to Whatbird! You are correct, that is a Cape May Warbler.
    1 point
  14. this is a picture (long zoom) of a juvenile Magnifcent Frigatebird i show in 2016 in the everglades at almost exactly this time of year - early Dec. it has the coloring described but several things about the phot used....was the neck as long as that shown in the photo - if so not likely a frigatebird. Was the beak as thin...if so not likely a wood stork.. the female frigate bird looked much like this except the head was black on the female Magnificant Frigate Bird juvenile (2) (640x428) by Jim Carscadden, on Flickr
    1 point
  15. Thanks for all your input. I need to look in new places come spring! The Black-bellied plovers were at that lake along with the Red Knots in May so that was pretty exciting. I’m finding that fall has been a real test for me! Thanks again.
    1 point
  16. In October there was a lone plover at Reed Lake. There was no sun shining on the plover but we thought we could see yellow/golden flecks on the back looking in our camera screens. I have done a lot of looking at both winter and juveniles photos for both plovers. They do look a lot alike. Any further clues on differences would be appreciated.
    1 point
  17. Yes, Boat-tailed is correct.
    1 point
  18. I have been chasing and photographing birds on the SE coast for nearly five years. I live on a barrier island off the coast of SC. In all that time, the one bird that has been my nemesis, and on my "life wish list" every year is the European Starling. Yes, I am about the only person in the world that has never seen one, or at least can't prove it with a photo, lol. I was visiting VA last month and saw this while on a drive to Chincoteague Island. I have about 125 birds on my "life list". Please tell me I can cross "European Starling" off my list? Finally? Thanks! Look at him. He looks like he's mocking me 😂
    1 point
  19. You didn't have to go that far. There all over the place up here in Columbia. Congrats on the lifer!
    1 point
  20. Agreed. You can cross it off your list. Now that you've seen one, you'll probably see thousands of them in the future!!
    1 point
  21. I think Boat-tailed, but don't hold me to it.
    1 point
  22. Correct! That is a European Starling mocking you! 😋
    1 point
  23. Yes. That’s so helpful. Your experience and observations are so appreciated.
    1 point
  24. Oh ok. I guess that sort of is a feature, but on winter there's a lot more white. I tend to go off giss (general impression of size and shape), colour and tail. Winter's are very compact and round, with a tiny tail that's often cocked up, overall winter are much darker as well. Sedge is cleaner above and below, and they have fine streaking running lengthwise down their back. Instead of brown, I find them to be more of a light straw colour, which is pretty uniform across their whole body, except some pretty clean white on the underparts. Sometimes Marsh and Sedge can a be a little tricky to separate, but Sedge is much lighter, and shows different back patterning, and a less bolded supercilium. Once you get the hang of it, wrens aren't so bad. Hope this helped for the future!
    1 point
  25. Close! This is a Palm Warbler. Note that the yellow is underneath the tail as well. In a Yellow-rumped, it's a more defined patch just on the rump, and the undertail is white.
    1 point
  26. Look like Green-winged to me.
    1 point
  27. 1 point
  28. Yep, I'm cheating here. xwing Cedar Wa-
    1 point
  29. Male and female Evening Grosbeaks with the 2 females in the middle. While I see them almost yearly when I travel up north, I don't think I have seen Evening Grosbeaks at my feeders since I took this photo back in 2012...until today when a single female showed up on our platform feeder for some sunflower seeds. Untitled by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    1 point
  30. Male(left) and female(right) Common Redpolls. Untitled by lonestranger102, on Flickr
    1 point
  31. Royal Terns on New Smyna Beach today.
    1 point
  32. Great Egret in Anastasia State Park, St. Augustine FL today.
    1 point
  33. Great Blue Heron in Anastasia State Park, St. Augustine FL today.
    1 point
  34. Golden-crowned Kinglet Golden-crowned Kinglet by Johnny, on Flickr
    1 point
  35. Eastern Kingbird. 🙂
    1 point
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