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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/06/2019 in all areas

  1. Hoot hoot! Today I saw a Great Horned Owl! (Perhaps for the first time.) This was at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix.
    7 points
  2. Northern Saw-Whet Owl Northern Saw-whet Owl -3874 by peter spencer, on Flickr
    5 points
  3. Can I add another pair of kestrels. Male left female right
    4 points
  4. Christmas eve present, d25 is a male born in 2011 at the Manasquan nest, in central New Jersey,he shows up around this time of year when they drain the local lake. High iso and no light but always cool to see that he is still alive and thriving, watched him chase and grab a Great blue heron for breakfast..
    3 points
  5. Red Crossbills (from Jan. 2018) Male: Lifer Red Crossbill by MerMaeve, on Flickr Female: Lifer Red Crossbill by MerMaeve, on Flickr
    2 points
  6. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S51358365 here's the list and in case any of you were wondering..... I STILL NEED SONG SPARROW
    2 points
  7. Hi all!! Sorry I haven't been on in a while I wanted to update: Yesterday I went on the Clermont Christmas bird count. we saw 86 Sp. (I saw 85 personally), including a rarities 1 Snail Kite, 15 Rusty Blackbirds and 20 Barn Swallows. My 2019 yearlist is 87 after yesterday. I got 4 lifers (Easter Screech-owl, Eastern Meadowlark, Vesper Sparrow and Rusty Blackbird) which brings my lifelist to 192. Also got 14 county lifers, which brings my county list to 118.
    2 points
  8. I only planned to take a picture of one woodpecker! Looks like another snuck in the back door!
    2 points
  9. This morning at No Name Key, FL Key deer buck. Not much bigger than a great dane. It is tough to have to work a project in Key West in the winter. Traffic stinks
    2 points
  10. Male Common Eider crashing down
    2 points
  11. With the yellow underparts, yellow undertail coverts, and yellow undertail, this looks good for a Yellow Warbler.
    1 point
  12. Wood Stock by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  13. Yes, Lesser Black-backed on the right in pics 1-2. The rest look like Herrings.
    1 point
  14. Looks like a Sharp-shinned to me.
    1 point
  15. True to form New Mexico has reverted to her old self. It is 36 and raining. The snow that has been on the ground for nearly a month is gone. The mud is about 6 inches deep. Asi es Nuevo Mexico. And they call it The Land of Enchantment. Good thing is the wind will kick up and have it dry in two days or so.
    1 point
  16. Domestic in khaki coloration, a common mutation in domestics.
    1 point
  17. I'll trade you a Song Sparrow for 5 of the birds that you saw that would be lifers.
    1 point
  18. Thanks!! yes, I had a fabulous time!!
    1 point
  19. From what I can tell from the photos it looks good for an Orange-crowned. Definitely doesn't have the wing-bars or eye-ring of a Ruby-crowned. What is your location? Helps to know location as it can narrow down possibilities for an ID.
    1 point
  20. 1. Lincoln’s 2. Swallow. ?
    1 point
  21. Spots vs. stripes! Neat. Here's are some Yellow-headed Blackbirds. Male: Female:
    1 point
  22. Yep! Pacific Golden Plover is correct!
    1 point
  23. Looks like a Cooper's with the thin, crisp streaking, blocky head, and graduated tail feathers. Nice shot!
    1 point
  24. I think this is a sharpie but you can correct me if I'm wrong. Either way - someone put a bad on it
    1 point
  25. It is a Golden Eagle, but I don't see anything that suggests juvenile.
    1 point
  26. "Well, you can't say I didn't try to tell you!! I told you you'd had enough to drink already, but 'Nooooooo, you said! I can handle it!' You wouldn't listen to me! Now you're paying the price!!! Happy New Year!!!" 1-Yolo Bypass NWR 03-22-2014 040 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    1 point
  27. The taxonomy of Asian Buteos is rather complicated currently and it is quite difficult to differentiate the exact Buteo species given the degree of overlap in their ranges and plumage differences. Based on range (HBW), Eastern Buzzard (Buteo japonicus) should be the most likely option in Thailand, although the paper below states that the Buteo japonicus from their native range in Japan look very different from the typical ones found in Thailand, which they propose are of a different subspecies under the Common Buzzard. Himalayan Buzzard is also possible (based on plumage) although HBW does sta
    1 point
  28. New at photographing birds with a new camera (Nikon P900). Have a long ways to go to be as good as you guys but I was happy to catch this pic of a Cedar Waxwing today.
    1 point
  29. I painted this Shoebill cartoon yesterday (mostly watercolors). @birdbrain22, how did I do?
    1 point
  30. "Hey, Honey? Ya know that list of potential retirement locations we've been working on? Strike Kirkland, will ya? Thanks, my darling! You're the best!"
    1 point
  31. Got down to -9. I'm not getting out of bed today. nuh uh. no way.
    1 point
  32. The kid in me (what's left of it), not to mention the adult in me, would be ecstatic as well.
    1 point
  33. Hi, I think this is a Common Buzzard. Note its broad tail, and short neck. In addition, the diagnostic dark spot on the carpal joint really makes me think that you've got a Common Buzzard here. Nice pictures and Happy New Year!
    1 point
  34. Female Red-bellied woodpecker. Male Red-bellied woodpecker.
    1 point
  35. This look scared me just a little. Great Gray by Fred Durkin, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. Mallards in the pond behind my house in Myrtle Beach, SC.
    1 point
  37. Pine siskin attack in Covington Louisiana this morning
    1 point
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