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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/05/2019 in all areas

  1. I'm seeing Horned here as well. I would expect a lot more black on the cheeks in Eared. Also, I notice that Eared have slender, almost upturned bills, and they also tend to have a much more slender appearance overall. I'm not seeing that here. Y'all need to calm down a bit lol. I think it's just been a while since we've had a lot of "beginner birders" on here (I'm a long-term member since 2015 and so is Ethan), so most experienced birders have fallen out of giving really extensive reasons for ID's. Nobody's asking the beginner birders to sit back and just take an ID as fact without looking into it themselves. Millipede, I think your questions were great and I would have answered them like Ethan did. But at the same time beginners are indeed beginners and a lot of the time simple GISS and experience with a species determines an ID. But I think experienced birders should step up and give better reasons (giving detailed reasons for IDs helps everyone). I believe Ethan answered your question so if you have any more questions about why the bird looks a certain way don't be afraid to ask!
    4 points
  2. I know I used deodorant this morning
    3 points
  3. Just as an update,E bird kicked it out ,ID is a horned-but it took around 18 hours to do so.The head shape was the factor-it should peak above the front of the head and fall away quickly.The bird does exhibit traits of an Eared but not enough.Thanks all for the input, been birding for 35 years and this was a first for me in Ohio, winter plumage.Breeding plumage is a no brainer.
    2 points
  4. I think it's a Red-winged Blackbird call note, but wait for another to confirm.
    2 points
  5. Agreed. That first photo was completely misleading, as it makes the bill look really small. Seeing the other photos, it's a typical Domestic Graylag x Canada. Note the big, bulky structure, bright legs, white head, pinkish bill, etc. But a word of caution, domestic geese and these hybrids are extremely variable in appearance. There's no one "formula" to identifying one of these hybrids. It's a combination of multiple features, and GISS (general impression of shape and size).
    2 points
  6. Most (all?) domestic geese are descended from wild Graylag or Swan Geese. Swan Geese have a pretty distinctive profile, so it's usually obvious if a bird has Swan Goose ancestry. Since we're not seeing that here, domestic Graylag is the assumed other parent, if it is indeed Canada X domestic.
    2 points
  7. Brand new baby lama!
    2 points
  8. We have pretty good luck with the jelly here in Ontario. All we do is use a plastic lid, usually from a plastic peanut butter jar, as a dish and secure it to our fruit table with a small screw. We use grape jelly and it's often just the cheap no name stuff. It does attract ants, squirrels, chipmunks, etc., so don't set it up right at your front door. The orioles are probably attracted as much by the orange halves we put out but they dive right into the jelly when they find it. The adults have fed the young ones jelly but the young are usually feeding themselves by the time we see them on the fruit table. Not only do the orioles here love the grape jelly but the cardinals, catbirds, and grosbeaks enjoy it too. I highly recommend a fruit table/station with any combination of grape jelly and assorted fruits, orange halves and watermelon slices work great for us. The orioles also like the sugar water mix we feed the hummers, we don't have an actual oriole feeder but they get their fill easy enough from the hummingbird feeders. I'm not sure if this link will work, but page 13 of my flickr photo stream has some pics of orioles at the fruit table from our old place. https://www.flickr.com/photos/27232701@N04/with/20420995539/
    2 points
  9. Long-eared Owl
    2 points
  10. Sometimes you just get the urge to do silly stuff with your photos. ?
    1 point
  11. I only began feeding the birds last year. I have become much more observant of the various Hawks I have seen then I had ever been in the past. I live in a more rural setting now. I have seen a couple red tails on my trees this past year. Saw one nearly grab one of my squirrels just as I stepped outside. I now know what a Cooper's hawk looks like, as they were camping my feeders. It has been amazing seeing the large variety of birds that visit my feeders. I am trying to get better at identifying hawks. So, I try to get a picture if I can. (I also try to get pictures of new birds I see and am unsure of). That bird yesterday was very striking and no doubt beautiful. The hawk today, one yesterday and the ? one in Jan were the biggest birds (of prey) I have ever seen in the wild. When that bird flew over me in Jan, It had come from someplace behind me as I was watching activity across the street. It was flying low. It really scared me, as I saw it only after it passed me and it was just so huge! On a drive out of town last week, I began counting all the hawks I saw perched along the highway! It seemed like every mile , there was another one. Hopefully, all 3 of the jumbo size raptors are just female red tail hawks and mystery solved. I am hoping some day I will be able to tell which raptor is which even with all their differences in appearance. We do have eagles in this area too. And if I ever see one, I am just hoping it will have the characteristic markings so I know what I am seeing! I really appreciate all of your help. And I a hoping to see the bird again and get better pictures
    1 point
  12. Wow! Even bigger than a Harpy! You get better at judging bird sizes with more experience, just from looking at the same birds over and over again, but it's still really hard with loan birds. I personally find this especially hard with loan accipters, I'll think it's either tiny or huge, and it will come by close and turn out to be the opposite species. Always hard to judge, especially birds in flight!
    1 point
  13. If I were to see this bird in my area with this much detail (like at a distance), I would've immediately thought Red-tailed. Believe me, Red-taileds can look extremely white in the right lighting (like when the sun is lower in the sky like it is now)! I would like better photos for confirmation, though.
    1 point
  14. Lincoln's Sparrow (blue-gray supercilium and back of the neck, buffy sides, thin, crisp streaking on flanks, back, and crown stripes, thinner bill than Song).
    1 point
  15. I get bored easily(not really bored... more like distracted... or bored...) so I have to come up with something interesting. Anyone wear a vest while birding? If so, any thoughts/comments on the types of vests you prefer? Fishing? hunting? birding? Best material, design, fabric, etc? I've been looking at some for a few reasons... and I'm almost wanting to just make my own. HA. First... the reason(s). 1. More pockets are always handy while birding. 2. I sometimes keep a small notebook for checklists in my shirt pocket. I lost a few birds from a few lists(BEFORE I got to submit them to eBird) due to sweat getting on the notebook... yay... 3. Something to decorate or really at least put pins/patches on. My kids(some of them anyway) and I are planning on participating in a program called Wings Over Arkansas where you submit all the birds you've ever seen in the state and some other info and, you get pins mailed to you for free. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission also has a program that I still have to figure out, specifically, how to participate in part of it to get free patches. anyway... so, for several reasons, I've been considering something for a while. I've gotten opinions from others not too long ago... there are a variety of options out there, I just can't figure out what I want yet. I'm a bit picky about things. I'm not vain in the sense that I care what other people think of how I look... but, I'm picky when it comes to what looks right or wrong on me. Something might look fine to others but hurt my eyes/brain. HA. Because of pickiness, uncertainty, and other factors, decision making is a BIG pain in the neck for me. The other year I lost my pocket knife and I spent 2 or 3 days on Amazon comparing a TON of them before buying one. Drove myself mad. So, I might hate some suggestions but, getting more ideas is always a good idea... You might aid in my slow descent into madness or, you might help me out. Only one way to find out. One of these days I need to find a site where I can upload a picture of my head and virtually try on different styles of hat... but that's a discussion for another day. And by the power that's vested in me, I now pronounce you free to bird...
    1 point
  16. Yep red winged black bird alarm call.
    1 point
  17. Hi again all. I saw it again today, but couldn't get a picture. I heard it cry several times, it didn't sound like a red tail. it sounded closest to a Ferruginous Hawk. I live in Kansas in the KC area and I know I am a bit further away then where they should be seem. Of course this could a different huge bird with white underparts. I hope it comes back and perches so I can try for another picture.
    1 point
  18. Striped Skunk,white variant
    1 point
  19. Wow - it works. I think this all goes back to how deceptive photos can be for ID. The first photo of the OP is definitely "not a good likeness".
    1 point
  20. We had siskins here in Georgia for the first time in years. Some people on my local Audubon group were complaining, because they had so many they were emptying the feeders too fast. Lol. The most I've had is 11, I think. They are still here as of today. Someone in Georgia last week had a repoll in their yard. Would have loved to have seen it!
    1 point
  21. You are exaggerating with "a gentleman" as I did with the "spoke to". It was just a hello.
    1 point
  22. TRIP SUMMARY: In all, we really enjoyed the trip. I had some concerns going in, mainly due to safety issues that non-birding friends had warned me about in Jamaica, and on the birding front about whether we could do it without a guide. I never felt unsafe while in Jamaica. The people were very friendly. Sure, in the towns people are often trying to sell you goods, but we never had any that were overly pushy. Many of the locals out in the rural areas were very friendly. On the birding front we did quite well. In reality we really didn't even need to stay so long. We got all 27 endemics in just 2.5 days! A guide certainly might have helped for some of those endemics, and surely we would have seen a few more non-endemics birds. We never saw a Northern Potoo (wouldn't be a lifer), but I'm sure a local guide would know exactly where a reliable day roost is. Perhaps we might have had better luck with Bahama Mockingbird and West Indian Whistling-Duck? Overall, no regrets. It often is a lot of fun to just be out birding with your friends! If you are out for pure numbers of birds, smaller islands will never be your best bang for the buck. However, they offer up birds that are just not present anywhere else, and sometimes in a relatively high concentration. Anyone who plans on doing even a moderate amount of traveling to see birds will want to hit up the Caribbean. Species total - 132 Endemic species - 27 of 27 Caribbean/Bahamas endemics - 39 Native lifers - 40 Introduced lifers (presumably countable) - 3
    1 point
  23. No, this is not an Ipswich. Not nearly pale enough, and that subspecies is restricted to the direct coast.
    1 point
  24. Your description or Domestic/Canada (same thing, I believe) seem to be the most widely accepted. This bird is a local celebrity and has been around for four or five Winters. The people who have been coming to see the Ross's Geese have been fascinated by this character.
    1 point
  25. Today in Durham Ca at the wildlife refuge mid morning.
    1 point
  26. Yeah, size is notoriously hard to judge, especially when they're up close, and by themselves in a tree. Female Red-tails can definitely be substantially larger than males, however. As to why the passerines weren't concerned, it could be because a Red-tailed Hawk is surprisingly not much of a danger to small birds. They prefer rodents and birds larger then you're average House Sparrow. Being a Buteo, they're not super manoeuvrable, like for example a Cooper's or Sharp-shinned Hawk, which are built to catch songbirds.
    1 point
  27. #1 first winter Ring Billed found pretty much across lower 48 coast to coast,they don’t get the ring until they get older..This is the vast majority of the gulls we get here .. Pass on 2 as I am not at all familiar with the western gull species.
    1 point
  28. Try 'bumping' your other post. Just open it and add the comment 'Bump''. That will push it to the top of the pile. Adding it to this one isn't going to get it much attention from our gull experts, since the post has hawks in the title.
    1 point
  29. Tricolored Heron by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  30. Northern pintail, brants, and green-winged teal.
    1 point
  31. A tale of three hawks: Cold and windy morning here in San Antonio. I decided to go ahead and head out to one of the local parks near my house, probably within a 2 mile radius. So, on the way to the park, I see a hawk flying. I decided to detour and follow and he perched up on a cellphone tower. But wait, he wasn't alone. There was another hawk there also. So I snapped the pictures and watched them fly off - Red Tails from what I could see. Now, granted, I am still new to this, but with the help I have received on the forums here, I felt pretty confident in the identification. So I continued on to the park, where I had seen some Red Shouldered Hawks the previous weekend. Sure enough, there was one there today perched in top of a tree. So, I continued my walk around the park area and got some good shots of other birds also. After my walk, I decided to head home. As I was pulling into my neighborhood, I noticed a hawk perched up on top of a light pole. Snapped some photos, and pulled around to get some shots of his front side. Well, it was a Cooper's Hawk. My wife had snapped some photos of him a few months back on top of a light pole near the house, but hadn't seen him since. I felt pretty lucky today. Was lucky enough to see three different species of hawks within a 2 mile radius of my house - and all here in the city.
    1 point
  32. Some very experienced and skilled birders have done their best to help you. You may not be convinced of the ID, but they can't say they see something they don't. Being newer at birding can be frustrating sometimes, and some things that experience has taught us seem almost impossible to newbies, such as the great difficulty in determining the real size of a bird you see in the field. I think for a lot of us it takes a dramatic experience to understand these things (like the first time I saw a Blue-and-White Mockingbird and kept trying to make it into some kind of way-out-of-range Jay, until I got a second, closer look and realized it was far smaller than I had thought at first; I had my ID in less than a minute after that.) With more experience and practice, you'll realize you've made mistakes in the past, and birds that were a total puzzle will eventually become ones you can ID at a glance. A little humility and patience with yourself goes a long way! Identifying wild birds takes knowledge, practice, and skill, and that's what makes it fun! If you can afford even a fairly inexpensive super zoom point-and-shoot camera you'll have far less frustration with photographing birds. I use a Canon SX530. I'm not publishing photos in birding magazines or anything like that (by a long shot), but I can usually get a shot that's more than good enough for an ID, and that I can enjoy looking at and studying to hone my skills. It turns out I'm not really interested in learning photography, but cameras are getting better all the time and are a great tool for birding.
    1 point
  33. Trust me, it happens. We had some real…interesting…ones back in the day, not sure how many others have been around here long enough to remember those times, but it used to be a fairly regular event. I don't really think we're dealing with one here, but probably better for everyone if we just let this topic fade away. We've done our job with the ID.
    1 point
  34. At this point I can't tell if you're just trying to annoy all of the other people who have already identified this bird for you, or you are actually serious. If the latter, then I would give you the advice that part of being "eager to learn and very curious" about anything involves listening to the more experienced people in that field. They actually do have more experience, and are better at birding, and identifying birds. If you have trouble seeing what they're all trying to tell you, then I'm afraid that it's going to be quite hard to get better at birding, and getting better at birding is one of the most fun things about it; realizing you're wrong on something, letting others help and correct you, and in the end, learn new things so you can slowly get better at avoiding mistakes. As well, obviously if birders that were in the field with you and saw the same bird and called it a hermit thrush, you missed something they did. As for the white spots you've pointed out, that's not part of the bird. And even if it was, you can't base an ID off of one bird, that would be like saying just because a Hermit Thrush and Barred Owl both have two white spots on them they are the same- oh wait that is what you're saying! Ok, how about a Barn Swallow and a Fork-tailed Flycatcher are the same just because they have tails that split. You have to take in the whole bird, and not just the colour, shape, patterns, giss and posture, but also range, probability, habitat, time of year, and what other people have seen! At the location you were at, people have seen Barred Owl, and they have seen Hermit Thrushes. And they are experienced birders with good reputations. If you'd like to send your photos to any reputable birder in your community, and I can guarantee that they will say at least that it's a cathartus thrush, and I would bet my life they wouldn't say Northern Hawk Owl. Sorry, computers sometimes make it hard to convey emotions through them as you said, so I'll make it clear, you make me frustrated
    1 point
  35. A pensive looking male Downy-woodpecker .
    1 point
  36. As awesome as it would be, the Florida bird was an adult, and this is not. Looks completely fine for Laughing.
    1 point
  37. Matching pair of Avocets at the Pixley NWR yesterday
    1 point
  38. don't know if I'll be able to keep up with this topic/thread but going through some old photos today and found this one... and had to share it. I posted it on Facebook or somewhere once with a short note... If this caterpillar can have a smile on its butt, you should be able to put one on your face. ? (and yes, that's the back end...)
    1 point
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