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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/11/2019 in all areas

  1. The Red-flanked Bluetail in Los Angeles! Saw it a couple months ago, but it was extremely difficult to photograph at that time. We got some fantastic views this time. Red-flanked Bluetail by mattgrube, on Flickr
    4 points
  2. I have a special interest in COGR subspecies, and study them at any chance I get. Photo 1: Both are Bronzed. Bronzed can show little purple iridescence. 2) Left and middle look like intergrades. Significant purple and blueish iridescence on the body. Right looks okay for Bronzed.
    3 points
  3. Millipede, I think the point is to start with the expected. If you see something that makes you wonder, then pursue it, but don't declare zebra just because you see a horse with a funny tail. It better have stripes as well. So is there anything in this immature bird, like white right to the bottom of the eye, or lack of brownish tones in the grey? No, this bird has black all around the eye and subtle brown tones here and there. So, it's a horse not a zebra. Scott
    3 points
  4. An Ovenbird would have black stripes on the crown and an orange crown patch between the stripes that you won't always see, and much heavier black streaking on the underparts; and yes, no reddish tail. It would also likely be more secretive than the Hermit Thrush.
    2 points
  5. Black scoters.
    2 points
  6. Yellow feet are the key here, it's a Snowy Egret.
    2 points
  7. Hermit Thrush is correct.
    2 points
  8. American Robin American Robin by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  9. Isn't that a WITCH owl?
    1 point
  10. Anyone interested in grackles? I know I wasn't - two weeks ago - but here we are. It's that time of year when grackles show up en masse to my area/backyard/feeder (NYS-Long Island). Some always stay and breed very locally but some that have shown up strike me as larger and more conspicuous even for a grackle. I've gotten curious as to the various forms of Common Grackle that can occur, and where. Wondering if these are all Bronzed (versicolor) as opposed to Purple (stonei), and if they might continue to move on northward and/or westward. There aren't many specific listings of the two forms for Long Island on ebird but the NatGeo field guide does seem to show year round range overlap for the two in coastal NY. The two pics were taken at different times, may or may not contain the same birds.
    1 point
  11. As you mentioned, Long Island is the heart of the overlap between the two. A significant number of birds there are intergrades. I live in coastal Fairfield County CT, and up here we have mostly Bronzed, a few intergrades, and Purple as very uncommon to rare.
    1 point
  12. no need to apologize for that. Most of my rambling back and forth was in response to the pushback I got for my pushback on the idea of giving the ID based on location alone. Was all friendly even if it didn't feel that way. I apologize to anyone that I made feel attacked or just generally uncomfortable. And I apologize to the original poster for the excessive discussion. Hopefully it isn't too overwhelming. ?
    1 point
  13. No need to worry on that point. That much is quite clear!
    1 point
  14. WOW! Congrats, Mel! I didn't know you were in to robotics. Learn something new every day!
    1 point
  15. We had a Spotted Redshank in Michigan in November, possibly brought over by the same weather system that brought the Gray Heron in Newfoundland.
    1 point
  16. A Gray Heron showed up in Newfoundland this past December.
    1 point
  17. We'll have to agree to disagree on this one. Hummingbirds straying out of their expected range by a couple hundred miles are one thing, esp. during migration and these days of climate change. Introducing the possibility of a bird from another continent, a bird not equipped for transoceanic migrations, is another critter entirely. The possibility is so slim that introducing it only confuses the identification.
    1 point
  18. Grays are strictly Old World. It can be fun to look at the possibilities but sometimes it can be taken to extremes, at least for identification purposes. There's no apparent evidence to question this being anything other than a GBHE.
    1 point
  19. Taken today near dusk. Definite red tail. Picking through leaf litter and in grass, then flitting to & perching in low branches of blueberry bushes. Very shy--stayed behind obstacles, which made photographing him very difficult. Would an Ovenbird be similar in appearance or would it not have the contrasting tail?
    1 point
  20. Cute, that's what it is! I'm pretty sure it is a Western Screech Owl...but wait for more replies. ?
    1 point
  21. Great Blue Heron, based on location. Looks to be a juvenile.
    1 point
  22. Sure looks like one. Back already! Scott
    1 point
  23. Yep, we have them year round here in Vermont. The gray forehead makes this a female.
    1 point
  24. I apologize that these are not recent, if that is an issue, but I now mostly photograph on eco-trips. Since I then get a passel of pix then I'd submit 20 in 4 days and that would be worse. Here are some blue-footed boobies from the Galápagos: Oh, bored?? look at my website to be updated tomorrow. The second photo is on the front page: https://www.housleyphoto.com
    1 point
  25. 72: Crested Caracara.
    1 point
  26. 1 point
  27. BBC Vermilion Flycatcher Vermilion Flycatcher by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. BBC White-lined Hummingbird Sphnix Moth 3-7-2019 White-lined Hummingbird Sphinx Moth by R. Tompkins, on Flickr
    1 point
  30. Hummingbird nest that survived many days of crazy wind, storms, and even snow here in Vegas
    1 point
  31. Red-tailed Hawk Red-tailed Hawk (Juv.) by Johnny, on Flickr Red-tailed Hawk (Juv.) by Johnny, on Flickr
    1 point
  32. We've had a TUVU, RWBL so far. I have 56 species so far this year. Side note, Fyn had some salamander pics in the newsletter too.
    1 point
  33. That's really a great shot, I'm envious
    1 point
  34. We got a record one-day snowfall where I live yesterday (nearly three feet!). That morning, I spotted a house finch on the balcony, chirping. Hopefully those feathers keep it warm.
    1 point
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