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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/15/2019 in all areas

  1. A Violet Green Swallow They are all nesting within the rock cliffs by the hundreds. Taken near Spokane, Wa.
    9 points
  2. 6 points
  3. a golden eagle flying up to it's nest. it even has an eagle outline on it's wing!
    5 points
  4. Thanks. It is the job of easterners to turn Bald Eagles, vultures, and European Starlings into Golden Eagles. So just doing my job. Incidentally, we do get a few Golden Eagles through the area. I believe the last one was in January. Also if this sounds a bit loopy, it's because just got out of surgery for a torn rotator cuff. Ooof.
    4 points
  5. Size can be notoriously difficult to judge, particularly at distances like this. That coupled with the magnification of lenses and binoculars further compounds the difficulty of gauging size. Images such as these, especially at such low resolution, are not a reliable proxy for size. Ravens do not reach Mississippi. Golden Eagles certainly do not breed in the southeast. Not to mention shape of the wings and tail as well as plumage patterning are all incorrect for the latter. The stout, broad wings, size of bill relative to head, and all-black plumage pin this as a Corvid (family of crows, ravens, jays, magpies, etc.), no question about that. There is simply no other bird in Mississippi that has this combination. Your pictures are more than ample to identify this as a crow. Take a look on Macaulay Library and you will see countless pictures of crows with identical appearance in regards to flight posture, plumage, and structural characteristics. The real question is whether this is an American Crow or a Fish Crow, both of which occur in central MS and are all but impossible to differentiate without vocalization. Listen for the birds' call and compare to recordings of either species to get a specific identification. Since the issue with this bird's identification seems to be its size, please re-read my first paragraph. I cannot emphasize enough, as someone with decades of experience in the field, that determining a bird's size from a distance is simply challenging and often times misleading.
    3 points
  6. 3 points
  7. 3 points
  8. 2 points
  9. Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher, first of year by hbvol50, on Flickr
    2 points
  10. But I am on Starling restriction. No Starlings for a full year.
    2 points
  11. A photo of a Raven from a few days ago (it was under attack from a Crow). This was the closest I could find at a similar angle. I immediately thought Crow/Raven when I saw the post.
    2 points
  12. Osprey (and "owl")
    2 points
  13. Rosette Spoonbill
    2 points
  14. Brown Booby, Lake Thurmond, Georgia. Oct 2016.
    2 points
  15. I thought so! I'm just not used to the hair! šŸ˜‚
    1 point
  16. Yep! You can just catch the bright yellow eye. He's hunched and fluffed, making him look stockier and thus more like a thrush.
    1 point
  17. If he's the same Dax I know from Kentucky, he's more north, near Louisville, I think. Either way, the martins have returned as far north as Ontario this year and there's no shortage of reports from N. Kentucky this year.
    1 point
  18. I'm not so sure these two are water ducks. They appear to be sitting on land.
    1 point
  19. Agree and the female Common behind.
    1 point
  20. I can't speak to the left-hand bird but I second Ring-Necked on the right.
    1 point
  21. The bill looks larger and culmen more round than I'd expect for Scarlet. I would call this a Summer.
    1 point
  22. 1 point
  23. Thanks. And a perfect example that perception of size can be misleading. Blue-gray gnatcatchers are about the size of my thumb and I thought for sure this bird was the size of an Eastern Phoebe.
    1 point
  24. 1 and 2 are Purple Martins, male and female respectively.
    1 point
  25. I'd say male Common Merganser on the left and male Ring-necked Duck on the right.
    1 point
  26. Yeah I think crow as well. I think the tail is actually pretty rounded, it's just an illusion that it looks wedge like. Also it doesn't have a big chunky bill like a Raven.
    1 point
  27. Iā€™m seeing Black-bellied for the same reason
    1 point
  28. Orchard Oriole by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  29. Thanks for moving it for me.
    1 point
  30. A Texas longhorn cow and her calf are well protected.
    1 point
  31. I think I'd lean Scarlet with this bill, but it's tough since I haven't seen summer for nearly a year, and scarlet for about half a year...
    1 point
  32. Yeah, I think the head size is being affected by the angle. Bald for me.
    1 point
  33. I'm thinking young Bald Eagle with a fish in its talons.
    1 point
  34. When changes are recent, often field guides will list both names, although usually they will indicate which is the obsolete one. Maybe check the informational part of the book to see if there is a convention, like the first name listed is the new one, or the old one is in parentheses, something like that. It's also possible that your field guide was reprinted in 2015 but it was not a new edition. And in any case, don't worry - you figured out what your bird is. Changes are made every year so the Internet can be a great resource for keeping track of them.
    1 point
  35. Magnificent Frigatebird. šŸ™‚ Photo Credit: www.audubon.org / field-guide / Photo: Glenn Bartley/VIREO
    1 point
  36. Looks better for a juvenile Mourning Dove.
    1 point
  37. No, I'm quite sure it is facing more towards us and it's carrying something light-colored in its beak that is obscuring almost its entire face.
    1 point
  38. I had an Indigo Bunting hopping around beneath the feeders this afternoon.
    1 point
  39. 1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. Wood Duck from the beginning of the month.
    1 point
  42. Not the best quality in the world, but it was taken through a vehicle window. American Avocet.
    1 point
  43. Ruby-crowned Kinglet takes flight
    1 point
  44. Ring-billed Gull
    1 point
  45. How about a few thousand snow geese in flight!
    1 point
  46. American Kestrel
    1 point
  47. Never know what you'll see when you're birding. Red Fox by Greg Miller, on Flickr Who is looking at who? by Greg Miller, on Flickr
    1 point
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