Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/17/2019 in all areas

  1. The audio file is definitely a Blue Jay.
    2 points
  2. Actually, this is a juvenile Eastern Towhee! Cowbird bills are more conical, and the white outer tail feathers is a Towhee thing.
    2 points
  3. Hi all, Is this a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet, male? Location: Northern Illinois Habitat: Mixed forest, brush-land, prairie willows. Date: Today
    1 point
  4. That would be my first choice as well, Rough -winged have a dirty throat /chest and perhaps this one may be puffed out a bit leading to the suggestion of a collar.
    1 point
  5. The weak collar has me wondering about Northern Rough-Winged.
    1 point
  6. Seconded, both on the ID and the photo!
    1 point
  7. Yes eye ring and crown nail it.Also black bars on back.Have never seen one this colorful before. Great image ! They can be very flitty so capturing this so well is a feather in your cap.
    1 point
  8. seconded... that white patch under the chin(if that's what you call it) is a good mark.
    1 point
  9. Photos taken this afternoon, 4/16/19, Skidaway Island, Chatham County, GA. We do see Brown-headed cowbirds around in the spring. I saw this Eastern Towhee feeding this fledgeling and I suspect that it's a cowbird fledgeling. Would like thoughts and comments. Thanks in advance.
    1 point
  10. Just sharing a closer look at the Coppersmith Barbet, taken close to my home in Penang, Malaysia.
    1 point
  11. Size can be notoriously difficult to judge, particularly at distances like this. That coupled with the magnification of lenses and binoculars further compounds the difficulty of gauging size. Images such as these, especially at such low resolution, are not a reliable proxy for size. Ravens do not reach Mississippi. Golden Eagles certainly do not breed in the southeast. Not to mention shape of the wings and tail as well as plumage patterning are all incorrect for the latter. The stout, broad wings, size of bill relative to head, and all-black plumage pin this as a Corvid (family of crows, ravens, jays, magpies, etc.), no question about that. There is simply no other bird in Mississippi that has this combination. Your pictures are more than ample to identify this as a crow. Take a look on Macaulay Library and you will see countless pictures of crows with identical appearance in regards to flight posture, plumage, and structural characteristics. The real question is whether this is an American Crow or a Fish Crow, both of which occur in central MS and are all but impossible to differentiate without vocalization. Listen for the birds' call and compare to recordings of either species to get a specific identification. Since the issue with this bird's identification seems to be its size, please re-read my first paragraph. I cannot emphasize enough, as someone with decades of experience in the field, that determining a bird's size from a distance is simply challenging and often times misleading.
    1 point
  12. Saw this bird at the Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary in Tasmania. Does anyone know its name? Thanks
    1 point
  13. 0 points
×
×
  • Create New...