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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/20/2019 in all areas

  1. Prairie Warbler by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    4 points
  2. Yellow-rumped (Myrtle, I believe) warbler has lunch.
    4 points
  3. Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.... Sleeping Oak Titmouse........ Titmouse..House Finches..Robin..06-24-2013 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    3 points
  4. Red-Tailed Hawk out hunting this morning.
    2 points
  5. Chestnut Sided Warbler Anhauc NWR 4-14-19 Chestnut Sided Warbler Anhauc NWR 4-14-19 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  6. Waterthrush, Louisiana Idaho's first state record:
    2 points
  7. I'm with Jerry, both on his welcome and his ID. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Double-crested_Cormorant
    1 point
  8. Common Gallinule? https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Gallinule/overview
    1 point
  9. Cardinals don't know grammar.
    1 point
  10. Brown-headed Cowbird, I believe.
    1 point
  11. 1 point
  12. Welcome to Whatbird! I'm wondering about Double-crested Cormorants.
    1 point
  13. I’m seeing a willet for sure and maybe a godwit?
    1 point
  14. I'm not making that call. For the moment, let's leave it for those who have seen more thrushes than I have.
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. Sorry for the problems with the link. Here is another try. https://photos.app.goo.gl/WzRhLtyRTwigkWMi8 What is the best way to share photos? Sometimes I can get the picture to show up in the post and sometimes just the link like above. Thanks, George
    1 point
  17. You're aware that a Veery is a species of thrush, right?
    1 point
  18. You took all that extra time being helpful with the link! That’ll teach you. 😜
    1 point
  19. Welcome! Sounds like a Painted Bunting. Try this: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Painted_Bunting/ EDIT: Sniped by @cvanbosk
    1 point
  20. That asks me for a Google ID, which I don't have one of.
    1 point
  21. Here's the email I sent out two days ago to the listserv explaining the difference. And in my post above that should say "live in CT". Can't edit it anymore. Hi CT Birders, Another spring has come around, thus the need for an important reminder. I'm sure most everyone is aware that there is a Little Blue x Tricolored hybrid heron at Hammo that has returned for a number of years, probably 6-7 by now if I remember correctly. This bird causes major identification issues for less experienced observers that need to be addressed as a reminder here. First, it seems simple, but keep in mind that there is a hybrid that is seen daily at Hammonasset, at various locations within the park. DO NOT assume that a small dark heron is a Little Blue. I see countless, countless reports on eBird and elsewhere of "Little Blue Heron" that are clearly the hybrid. Here's an overview of the ID for those who are unfamiliar or simply as a reminder: Color pattern is crucial. Adult Little Blue Herons show a distinct contrast between the blue body and purplish upper neck. The hybrid shows very little to no contrast. With a good look, you will see that the neck is all one color. A frequently noted field mark is white patches on the underparts of the hybrid. This is a clue but it is often misleading. In the spring months, the bird shows little to even no visible white below. So lack of white noted on a heron at Hammo this early in the season DOES NOT necessarily mean it's a Little Blue and not the hybrid. The bill is another important mark. The hybrid has a longer bill that is thinner and comes to a point at the tip. This can be hard to observe at times, but when visible is helpful in separating it from Little Blues, which typically have a somewhat thick and relatively short bill. The hybrid acquires yellowish lores around mid/late summer. This difference by point in the year is important. For the next couple of months the bird will not show that so it is not an accurate ID point. As an overview, plumage details, and the bill shape and color are the best ID characteristics for this bird. Please study the any heron carefully before entering it into eBird. I see so many ID mix-ups that warrant a post or two like this. ID mistakes are preventable by knowing the field marks going into a birding trip to Hammo and looking thoroughly at photos afterwards. Carefully check your herons at Hammo! Aidan Kiley
    1 point
  22. I do kinda like this one for Veery. When was this taken?
    1 point
  23. Green Heron Green Heron Estero Llano Grande State Park 4-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  24. Fork-Tailed Flycatcher
    1 point
  25. You might check out Northern Harrier.
    1 point
  26. 1 point
  27. This is the Little Blue x Tricolored Heron hybrid that has been coming back to Hammo for at least 6-7 years.
    1 point
  28. No white chin so red-breasted
    1 point
  29. The males and females of this species cannot be told apart by plumage. However, there are two morphs of White-throated Sparrow, the tan-striped (which your bird looks to be) and the white-striped.
    1 point
  30. White-throated Sparrow.
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. Tulip festival time in the pacific north west
    1 point
  33. Last year it took a while before I was able to get a nice photo of an Orchard Oriole, but this spring I've been able to get some nice shots early. I couldn't decide which photo I liked better, so I'm cheating a little and posting two... Orchard Oriole by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr Orchard Oriole by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. Laughing Gull Anahauc NWR 10-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher, first of year by hbvol50, on Flickr
    1 point
  37. My first visit to Yellowstone and came away with many fond memories, one of which is this magnificent blue Mountain Bluebird. I just joined a couple of weeks back and have been greatly helped by members of this forum who helped identify the birds that I photographed in my visit to the US last April/May. Thank you.
    1 point
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