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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/21/2019 in all areas

  1. I was at a bird banding yesterday in Lake Jackson Texas when this Barred Owl was caught in the misting nets (extremely rare occurrence). They brought the owl back to the banding station and banded it. Was amazing to witness.
    5 points
  2. Red-winged Blackbird by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    4 points
  3. I can't drive 55, what makes them think 30 will do?
    3 points
  4. Phinizy Swamp Nature Park, Augusta, GA; today. I saw my first Common Yellowthroat but he was too fast for me to get photos. I did get this Yellow Warbler and a couple of Bobolinks!
    2 points
  5. Looks like he's molting. Birds molt the same feathers on either side of their tail, at the same time, so when they get to the inner feathers it can make the tail look notched. (Agreed with SOSP)
    2 points
  6. 2 points
  7. My best guess is drab Pine Warbler.
    2 points
  8. Cattle Egret with dragonfly Cattle Egret with lunch by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  9. Yes, they can be tricky when high overhead and lighting not favorable. Agree on the immature Bald Eagle. Note the white 'armpits' aka wingpits and the white band along lower end of tail. These are telltale signs of a young Bald. A young Golden will have white areas concentrated further up the wing at the base of the primaries, and at the base of the tail. An adult will be brown overall, with somewhat paler flight feathers visible in good lighting.
    2 points
  10. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher has lunch...
    2 points
  11. 1 point
  12. I think they molt from the center out, which would explain why the remaining tail feathers are rather ragged at the ends.
    1 point
  13. Seen yesterday on the coast near Pescadero Beach just south of San Francisco. I suppose it's a Song Sparrow, but I'm a little confused by the tail which is notched. Cornell says that the tail should be rounded. Thanks for your help.
    1 point
  14. Looks like a Brewster's Warbler (Golden-winged / Blue-winged hybrid) to me.
    1 point
  15. Really!!! And I agree with Tree.
    1 point
  16. Happy Resurrection Day! Happy Easter!
    1 point
  17. Ok, cool. I can see that now. I got the bill shape wrong. It just threw me off because they appeared larger than the other Lesser Goldfinches I have seen in the area. Thanks guys. Learn something new every day.
    1 point
  18. Probably just a 2nd year male or just a late molting male.
    1 point
  19. Lark Sparrow. That facial pattern is pretty distinctive.
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. Maybe Blackburnian Warbler.
    1 point
  23. I believe it is a White-eyed Vireo.
    1 point
  24. Northern Flicker, yellow-shafted šŸ™‚
    1 point
  25. Definitely for the foreground bird. Less sure about the background bird, but Iā€™d still lean Greater.
    1 point
  26. I second that, Marbled Godwit
    1 point
  27. 1 point
  28. No, Barn Swallow fledglings have yellow gapes.
    1 point
  29. Red-Tailed Hawk out hunting this morning.
    1 point
  30. 1. Yes 2. Dowitcher sp. 3. Fox Sparrow, I believe 4. Pacific Wren, by range 5. Ruby-crowned Kinglet l 6. Ditto 7. Yellow-rumped Warbler 8. Common Loon 9. Not sure on age, but yes to WC Sparrow
    1 point
  31. Prairie Warbler by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  32. Chestnut Sided Warbler Anhauc NWR 4-14-19 Chestnut Sided Warbler Anhauc NWR 4-14-19 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  33. Yellow Grosbeak. šŸ™‚ Photo Credit: Wikipedia / Arjan Haverkamp
    1 point
  34. Into shape--oh, you have an ID question? Yes, those are American Pipits.
    1 point
  35. Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher, first of year by hbvol50, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. I didn't know Red-headed Woodpeckers would make holes to stash acorns in like an Acorn Woodpecker _91A5752 by chipperatl2, on Flickr Osprey 691A3652.jpg by chipperatl2, on Flickr
    1 point
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