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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/17/2019 in all areas

  1. I had a Veery close encounter with this Veery cool bird today.
    3 points
  2. Since I'm on a streak of one for hawks, I'm going to suggest Swainson's (adult, intermediate or rufous morph), with the white over and beside the bill, and the white mark on the breast suggesting a "bib". A Red-tail would have more mottled plumage with a visible belly-band (unless it was much darker than this). Harlan's in particular is mottled, never has this much rufous as far as I knew, and should be in Canada or Alaska now. Corey, if you got even a bad shot of the tail, that might help. That rock is so inconvenient. ?
    2 points
  3. Dark-eyed Junco [Oregon]. ?
    2 points
  4. Cedar Waxwings Cedar Waxwings by johnd1964, on Flickr
    2 points
  5. Bare-Throated Tiger Heron
    2 points
  6. Yellow-Crowned Night Heron
    2 points
  7. Female Summer Tanager
    2 points
  8. That is a House Wren.
    1 point
  9. This is my first posting so please forgive any errors. I saw this bird at my feeder in Central Iowa and am unable to identify it. I've never seen one before and cannot find it in my bird book. We had heavy thunderstorms last night and I'm wondering if the little guy got blown off course. Hoping someone out there can help. Sorry for the poor picture quality.
    1 point
  10. Every four or five days at most; and maybe three if it's really hot. Otherwise it starts to go bad. That's another reason small feeders are better than larger ones. Those large ones make sense if you're down in Brownsville TX where hummies migrate through by the thousands and people use literally gallons of food in a week.
    1 point
  11. Very interested in the feedback on that Hummbug feeder! I keep seeing them, and thinking it sounds cool..... For what its worth I make up a pint or two of hummingbird sugar water and keep it in the fridge so that my husband can fill the feeders if he feels inclined (and he often is). I only use smaller feeders that hold less than a cup of liquid, I find that even during the busiest parts of the season multiple small feeders works better for me than one or two larger ones. Ruby Throated Hummers don't share feeders well.
    1 point
  12. My guess would be a Dark Morph Red Tailed Hawk (Harlan's) but wait for the experts.
    1 point
  13. Thanks for the additional photos. The warbler is a female Black-throated Blue (pale lower eye arc and supercilium).
    1 point
  14. Tanager is correct. This is a molting male Summer Tanager.
    1 point
  15. Asked and answered! Sorry for the confusion.
    1 point
  16. Thought I saw a notch on that tail feather, but it just looks like a light spot, so I agree with Allen's. I think your first cormorant is a Brandt's, and I see Brandt's and Double-crested in your group pic.
    1 point
  17. The pale gray spotting on the chest of the thrush make it a Veery. Second bird is a warbler with the thin bill, I think Bay-breasted. Last bird is a female House Finch.
    1 point
  18. I think Charlie used the wrong code. Likely meant SESA. @Charlie Spencer feel free to correct me.
    1 point
  19. Maybe molting, but it could be a brood patch. Females lose some feathers on the belly when incubating eggs to keep the eggs close to the body for warmth.
    1 point
  20. Pale belly and grayish chest, short straight bill, black legs. I agree with Semi Sand. Charlie, not sure where you're seeing Spotted Sand, but there is a Semi Sand and Semi Plovs in the last two photos.
    1 point
  21. Try forming a House Owners Association.
    1 point
  22. Bumped, by appointment to Her Royal Majesty.
    1 point
  23. Yes. One of our few year round gull species here in San Diego.
    1 point
  24. faint breast streaking-female yellow
    1 point
  25. Everything's bigger in Texas! ?
    1 point
  26. In TEcate Mexico May 13.
    1 point
  27. Ash-throated Flycatcher. ?
    1 point
  28. Last one looks like a Veery. Others are Swainson's.
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. Z-95 Headhunter Star Fighter
    1 point
  31. Adult Male and second year male Orchard Orioles there.
    1 point
  32. X wing Fighter :)
    1 point
  33. Oooopppsss!!!! Sorry 'bout that!
    1 point
  34. Looks like a Common Yellowthroat. Tennessee Warblers have dark eyelines, light superciliums, shorter tails, straighter beaks, and a more horizontal posture.
    1 point
  35. Upset Tree Swallow ? 1-Yolo Bypass NWR 4-05-2014 029 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    1 point
  36. Yep, House. House on a house?
    1 point
  37. Tree Swallow 1-Yolo Bypass NWR 4-05-2014 077 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    1 point
  38. It is a rail... I believe Virginia.
    1 point
  39. I've been fortunate this spring on getting a few good shots of Prairie Warblers. This one is my favorite so far... Prairie Warbler by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  40. Couldn't decide which photo I liked best... Indigo Bunting by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr Indigo Bunting by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  41. Yes, a female Wild Turkey. It's not unusual to see them in urban areas, especially as urbanity is encroaching into wilderness areas more and more each and every day!!! This is also nesting season for them, so they are not in flocks like they are for most of the year.
    1 point
  42. Common Yellowthroat by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
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