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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/18/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
  2. I'm thinking Yellow Crowned Night Herons
    2 points
  3. Been AFK, so this one's from Wednesday... Hooded Warbler (Montrose Point, Chicago, IL)
    2 points
  4. 2 points
  5. Red-breasted Nuthatch getting bossy over the feeder with the chickadees.
    2 points
  6. Iceland Gull Sea gulls on a cliff by christianschmaler, on Flickr
    1 point
  7. I agree. Those head plumes are distinctive.
    1 point
  8. From my bird haul this morning I can't seem to identify this last one. Looking through references in southern Nevada I just don't see it. This wikipedia photo of a willow flycatcher seems to match https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willow_flycatcher Photo taken today in Henderson, NV
    1 point
  9. They are definitely White Ibis. May be the lighting.
    1 point
  10. This is a Swainson’s Thrush. Note the buff in the face.
    1 point
  11. @Creeker Wow! A turkey mafia! Thanks for the link. That article answers a lot of my questions.
    1 point
  12. I think I’m seeing Caspian, too
    1 point
  13. This is a Ruddy Turnstone.
    1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. Here is my AAR on our families Spring Break trip to Corpus Cristi (Padre Island). Stayed at the El Constante Condominiums from 5/14 to 5/19. Wife and kids were happy. Plenty of beautiful weather and all the beach they could want. 14 life birds for me. Most seen just driving around. On Mustang Island there are plenty of places to park on the west side of the island and walk around. We found a fenced off plover breeding area with many Wilson's and Piping plovers running around. You can also get photos like this: DSC06408r Long-billed Curlew and Whimbrel by Mark Ross, on Flickr This was taken out the window of my car car. The birds were perhaps 10 feet away. So no great accomplishment getting most of these birds. The only one I am proud of is this one my wife spotted by the side of the road driving to the National Seashore visitor's center. She made me stop and back up. I am glad she did. DSC05447r Upland Sandpiper by Mark Ross, on Flickr Here is my complete list of new birds: White-winged Dove, American Acovet, NT Cormorant, White-tailed Hawk, R Spoonbill, Scissortail flycatcher, LB Curlew, Whimbrel, W Plover, Reddish Egret, Sandwich Tern, Caracara, Upland Sandpiper, Great-tailed Grackle.
    1 point
  16. Sayeth Doc "Comm Grackle" Holliday: "I'm Your Huckleberry "
    1 point
  17. Forgot to add, maybe an indigo bunting in the first. And I think it's the Tennessee warbler you're asking about. Fast high pitched...
    1 point
  18. Too much..... ha... 1. I hear a cardinal, titmouse, eastern wood-pewee, a mosquito or some other insect at one point... A tennessee warbler is singing as well, fast pulsating or however you might describe it. A vireo of some sort I think, and perhaps a northern mockingbird. Maybe a blue jay right at the end. There's a LOT going on in there... and I'm not sure which one you're hearing that you're asking about. 2. I'm not sure. Doesn't quite sound fast enough for a tennessee warbler... almost want to wonder if it's just a cardinal. My ears aren't great and sometimes I hear just part of a sound, and this year I've been hearing a LOT of partial cardinal songs that have thrown me by how fast they've been.
    1 point
  19. The orange feet, two wingbars, gray and green plumage, and the broken eyering all fit Blackpoll. See this photo: https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/blackpoll-warbler#photo2
    1 point
  20. Looks like a juvenile Say's Phoebe to me.
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. Heron, little blue.
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. Yes, Broad-winged -- my favorite!
    1 point
  25. I had a Veery close encounter with this Veery cool bird today.
    1 point
  26. American Kestrel, male by hbvol50, on Flickr
    1 point
  27. I've been fortunate this spring on getting a few good shots of Prairie Warblers. This one is my favorite so far... Prairie Warbler by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  28. Excuse me, do you mind?!?!?
    1 point
  29. Dove might be a Eurasian Collared.
    1 point
  30. I'd say short billed. The Buffy tips go up the sides of the feather. In long billed, the Buffy colour is limited to the tips.
    1 point
  31. Couldn't decide which photo I liked best... Indigo Bunting by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr Indigo Bunting by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  32. Avian version of Tombstone: Starring, Wyatt "GT Grackle" Earp and Ike "Red-Shouldered" Clanton: "I see red shoulders I kill the hawk wearing them. So fly you curr! Fly! Tell all the other currs the law's coming. You tell 'em I'm coming, and hell's coming with me!"
    1 point
  33. Had my best day birding my local hotspot on Friday. 80 species, 23 warbler species including lifer Golden-winged Warbler. I looked at it and went "Chestnut-side...WAIT!!!....where did it go?" Luckily it was noisy and active so eventually managed a decent shot after a few rather blurry behind branch ones.
    1 point
  34. Why would I go off on you? It's just a bird, regardless of what species it turns out to be (or not). Lacking any feedback, I'd settled on Caspian as the default anyway.
    1 point
  35. I can't believe that it took me so long to find this one. Red-Eyed Vireo
    1 point
  36. 78 Scissor-tail flycatcher!
    1 point
  37. 72: Crested Caracara.
    1 point
  38. Long-eared Owl
    1 point
  39. Red-cockaded Woodpecker from last Saturday. We saw two and possibly a third. Their range is limited to the southeast. RCWs are somewhat endangered. They are the only woodpecker to nest in live trees and they only nest in Longleaf pines. The pines have to be about eighty years old before they are large enough for nesting purposes. In years past, many Longleaf pines were harvested and replaced with fast growing Loblolly pines. More recently, steps have been taken to restore Longleaf pine habitat. Much of this has been done on military bases. Locally we have a few colonies on the Fort Gordon Army base. This is also the first banded bird I have seen. Virtually all RCWs are banded. The photos aren’t great but good enough for ID. As always, woohoo!
    1 point
  40. It's always nice when you see a lifer and you actually get a decent photo of it. I just returned from two weeks down in the Yucatan, we often stay in a condo by the beach in Playacar, which is about 40 miles south of Cancun. We've been going there for years and I always walk the neighborhood looking for birds. These days I don't often pick up lifers in that area, just the usual native birds. I always check out this one small park as I often see several species of orioles there. On this trip I got a glimpse of this bird and initially thought it was an oriole, but as soon as I got a decent look at it I knew it was something different. I stalked it through the park for a while and finally got a few decent photos of the bird. At the time I thought it might be a Cacique, but I wasn't sure until I was able to check the guide. It is a Yellow-winged Cacique and going by the guide, it was pretty far out of its usual range. I saw it several times in that park, so for whatever reason it seems to be living there or close to it. Yellow-winged Cacique by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  41. A productive whirlwind trip to South Georgia. (got a few other neat birds to, that were on the rare side, but they weren't lifers!) Sandhill Cranes by midgetinvasion, on Flickr Vermillion Flycatcher by midgetinvasion, on Flickr Limpkin by midgetinvasion, on Flickr
    1 point
  42. This was my first ABA lifer in over a year. I didn't have a single ABA lifer in all of 2018! Red-flanked Bluetail by mattag2002, on Flickr
    1 point
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