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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/21/2019 in all areas

  1. Black-billed Cuckoo. It's hard enough to find one of these birds but I saw three of them in the same area this morning.
    3 points
  2. Cedar Waxwing Cedar Waxwing by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  3. Actually looks like an Eastern Wood-Pewee.
    2 points
  4. Eastern Bluebird by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    2 points
  5. Yes, a lot of experts and banders will tell you that they are completely unidentifiable but that's not fully true. Older birders tend to be stuck in the mindset that they are inseparable from the time they were one species. Typical Alder and Willow have fairly distinctive looks. Classic Willow here has a more crested head, more dull colored back with some brownish gray tones, wingbars tend to be less strong and less white, and a weak to no eyering. Alder typically has a flat head unlike typical Willow, more olive greenish overall with little to no brownish gray, stronger white wingbars, and a stronger, often complete eyering. GISS (general impression of shape and size) tends to be very useful with empids. With empid experience, you'll get a strong Willow or Alder impression on a bird.
    2 points
  6. Canada Goose by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    2 points
  7. Sorry no other photo. These small one hardly sit still lol
    1 point
  8. 1 point
  9. Talked with another local birder... This guy is younger, a college student, and on the field trips, our local audubon trip leader defers to him for a lot of ID's and counts as he's VERY observant and can hear birds that some of us can't so well. He was a LITTLE supportive of ID'ing by sight but with some words of caution... I'm sure I could be wrong but, I don't think ID'ing by sight is going to be 100% accurate. That's my "opinion" and what I'm going with. I might be wrong, MAYBE you guys can be right about those birds 100% of the time. AND it wouldn't hurt for me to learn these marks just to get better impressions. But I don't think I'll ever completely rely on the visual appearance of either as a positive ID. I'll continue to list the silent birds as empidonax sp. I am okay with being uncertain as it feels better than being completely certain only to be mistaken... which happens to me, and the VERY best of birders. That's one of the fun things that helps me feel less incompetent as a birder... knowing that even Sibley and other leaders will still make mistakes or have birds that they just can't ID sometimes. Brings a smile to my face when a couple of you that I look at as VERY experienced have different opinions on a bird. Helps me remember that sometimes, when I struggle, it's not that I'm JUST inexperienced, some of them are just THAT tough. ? anyway... Thanks for letting me ramble out my thoughts on this. No hard feelings anywhere in any of that.
    1 point
  10. I'm not going to jump in and give an ID on the warbler but the bird nuts are right about it not being a canada. There should be an eye-ring for that. And I just checked the field guide and it seems the leg color would be different on a canada. The young magnolia(earlier than May according to the book) could look sort of like that with something of a line across the throat(which is what probably prompted the canada ID in the first place) I'm going by drawings in Sibley's 1st ed. so, I'm sure things can be variable. A young magnolia(in the book) should have more marks on it I'd think but, I think it's in transition perhaps. The line around the neck is still present but the bill is darkening already and, the streaks should come in provided that's what it is. Anyway, that's my take on it. I think in the field I would have been REALLY confused if that was my photo, and probably would have posted it here to check as well. :) They're all fun.
    1 point
  11. Any other shots of the first bird? I agree with 2 and 3 including the hyphen. Undecided on bird 1.
    1 point
  12. We (both of us Bird Nuts) learned the subtle differences between the Alder and Willow by listening, observing, and studying photographs of them. I'm sure akiley did the same. What akiley wrote about the differences is consistent with what we've learned. However, I still don't like to report a Willow or Alder without hearing it first.
    1 point
  13. The first looks better for a Magnolia Warbler (black bill, no white eyering). I agree with the others (except Wood-Pewee has a hyphen ).
    1 point
  14. Say's Phoebe seconded.
    1 point
  15. Say’s Phoebe?
    1 point
  16. I'm not really sure. I've been told and have read, that the more years you keep feeding, the more show up over time.
    1 point
  17. 1. Female Canada Warbler 2. Eastern Wood pewee (a species of flycatcher) 3. Chestnut-sided warbler
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. I remember!!!! Welcome back!
    1 point
  20. I remember you! ? Welcome back!!
    1 point
  21. Yellow-bellied with always have yellow in the throat that shows very little contrast with the rest of the stomach. This definitely isn’t Yellow-bellied.
    1 point
  22. 4 looks better for Willow Flycatcher.
    1 point
  23. Dunlins are going to have dark bellies this time of year, easy ID. Image for learning purpose.Note that the Sanderlings lack a back toe, only 3.
    1 point
  24. Black-legged Kittiwake! All yellow bill, and wings that look they're dipped in ink.
    1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. Yellow Crowned Night Heron.
    1 point
  27. These are ring-necked ducks. They're pretty... similar colors to scaups but the patterns are different. That white that comes up the front/side and the ring on the bill helps ID it.
    1 point
  28. This time of year, Cassin's will give themselves away when they sing. They do the whole skylark thing, where they launch themselves into the sky, singing as they go. Botteri's just sit on top of a bush and sing.
    1 point
  29. cool, thanks. Probly not for me then.
    1 point
  30. Welcome, Justin! Good insight; you've done your research and you're exactly right! I agree with Botteri's and Cassin's respectively for the reasons you stated.
    1 point
  31. Chauncey shows up with his "How many bugs can you fit in your mouth" entry. ? Song Sparrow - Kane Co., IL
    1 point
  32. Whew, thanks. I was following this because the closest I could get, which wasn't really that close, was Great Kiskadee! The only Philly of my experience was not nearly this yellow. Nor did the face have this much contrast. @MerMaeve I'll "like" your reply tomorrow after my likes replenish.
    1 point
  33. That is actually a frog, a Spring Peeper to be exact.
    1 point
  34. Been AFK, so this one's from Wednesday... Hooded Warbler (Montrose Point, Chicago, IL)
    1 point
  35. I had a Veery close encounter with this Veery cool bird today.
    1 point
  36. Red-breasted Nuthatch getting bossy over the feeder with the chickadees.
    1 point
  37. I've been fortunate this spring on getting a few good shots of Prairie Warblers. This one is my favorite so far... Prairie Warbler by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
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