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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/28/2019 in all areas

  1. Sticking With Mom! by hbvol50, on Flickr
    5 points
  2. I am sure I posted this before but this Grackle was nasty to this Black Crowned Night Heron
    4 points
  3. Hooded Oriole by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    2 points
  4. Blinded Sphinx (photo taken at nearly midnight -- I love my new ring light!!)
    2 points
  5. WE HAVE BABIES!!! Our Hummingbird finally hatched!! I was getting worried! This is the 1st time I've been able to get a picture.. Whoooo hooooo!!!
    2 points
  6. Baltimore Oriole w/ snack for the fledglings Baltimore Oriole by Johnny, on Flickr
    2 points
  7. There has been a Hummingbird near my house every year but this is a 1st for me! Every night when I came home a bird would zoom out from under the eaves near the door. Then a few nights ago my man friend says hey there is a Hummingbird stuck up in the corner under the eaves. He said he turned out the front light so maybe it would calm and find its way out. We brain stormed as to why it might be there, roosting, catching bugs, but we never thought it would be nesting... Not only nesting but doing it on the TOP OF A WINDCHIME!!! .. We are to excited!!! There are 2 eggs!! Silly girl!!! What other crazy places have folks found nests?
    1 point
  8. Thanks so much! I've never heard that term. I'm very excited to have this strange little guy in my life!
    1 point
  9. Hi and welcome! I moved this to the North American ID forum for you. That does look like a leucistic Blue Jay to me. Leucism is when there is some abnormal absence of color but the bird is not fully albino, just what you describe. Sometimes they seem to do just fine, but it can affect their behavior too. Many of us like seeing them because they are a bit uncommon!
    1 point
  10. Turquoise--browed Motmot by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  11. 1 point
  12. Welcome to Whatbird!! Nighthawks, and by range should be Common Nighthawks. Nice shots!! Out of range for a Whip-poor-will. EDIT: I suppose a Whip-poor-will could be there, but color pattern fits Nighthawk better.
    1 point
  13. It may look tougher but it may also make it tougher to eat. The tips of the upper and lower mandibles don't meet as they normally would. I suspect this bird may sometimes eat using the sides of his beak.
    1 point
  14. I wouldn’t call it a deformity if it makes it look tougher lol
    1 point
  15. purple gallinule purple gallinule by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  16. I see: Marbled Godwits, a Black-necked Stilt, an American Avocet, Western Willets, at least a few Dowitchers (look like Long-billed), and a group of Wilson's Phalaropes on the right side.
    1 point
  17. Looks like a California Gull with a bill deformity.
    1 point
  18. White-winged Dove by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    1 point
  19. Welcome to Whatbird!! You have a Mourning Dove.
    1 point
  20. If you want a guaranteed opportunity, weather permitting, to photograph Atlantic Puffins, this is the tour to take. I first heard of this tour on PBS's "Wild Photo Adventures". I have wanted to go to New England for quite some time so I included this tour on my things to do. I will try to be informative but brief. I booked this tour through Bold Coast Charters out of Cutler, ME. Your Captain is Captain Andrew "Andy" Patterson. They start taking reservations shortly after the New Year. This year, reservations were closed by Feb. 15. I tried to make one for the "peak" (June 19) of the season on Jan. 3. That date was already booked. I was able to make a reservation for June 12 by Jan. 6. The fee is $150, half due at the time of reservation the other half at departure. Cash or check. Refunds provided for weather related cancellations. You might not go. You might go but not land. Please go to the Bold Coast Charter website for more particulars. I chose what turned out to be a "perfect" day. We left at 8 a.m. It takes about an hour to get to the island. The Island is disputed between the USA and Canada. If you land, you are on a Bird Sanctuary. You are expected to follow directions that are given. Nothing major. Just do as you are told. Once everyone in the party is on the dock you go up to a gathering spot, offered use of the outhouse (one at a time walking to and from), then you are escorted to your photo blind. Four people per blind and we were allowed 1 hour. Blind time might vary. There are so many puffins and Razorbills so close to the blind I would have been satisfied with 15 minutes. You do not need a very long lens. I used my Zuiko 50-200mm zoom with 2x teleconverter. Our blind was oriented south (door) to north. Four slide up shutters along each side alternating standing and kneeling eye levels and one standing opening on the North end. 4 strangers and we all took turns at different openings. You do not need a tripod or monopod. The window openings are adequate. The host of the PBS show used a tripod, but he had an entire blind to himself (with photographer). He supposedly had only a half hour! Birds - On the island you will see: My personal lifers - Atlantic Puffins, Razorbills, Artic Terns, and Savannah Sparrows were very common. I also saw a Northern Gannet and a Red-breasted Nuthatch. The only previous seen bird were Common Terns. When you walk to and from the outhouse the terns, protecting their nests will harass you flying around your head. I was pecked twice. Fortunately I had a knit cap on. On departure, Captain Andy cruised briefly offshore the main island and a very small neighboring island. From the boat I was able to photograph Lifers - Common Eiders and Common Murres. Also some seals and a Bald Eagle (not a lifer). Going and coming I photographed for the first time a Common Loon and a Black Guillemot. So one trip, 10 lifers if my math is correct. Some people in the group had taken the tour multiple times. Some were planning on going again. I enjoyed it, but the weather was so nice I think this was a once in a lifetime opportunity for me and am looking forward to visiting other areas of the USA for bird photography, Atlantic Puffin Razorbill Arctic Tern
    1 point
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