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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/11/2019 in all areas

  1. Sorry to be a little scarce lately! I had some major internet problems and the September craziness is in full swing (the 15th is Independence Day here, and we have activities all month long). But I've deleted the ID requests that were reposted, as well as @Charlie Spencer's replies to them and my own. @Shazam, I hid your post rather than deleting it, bcause you haven't reposted the ID request. If you need the post back let me know.
    5 points
  2. It occurs to me that whenever I see a bird rendered particularly unattractive by molt, that it's almost always a male. Obviously that doesn't apply to species where the sexes look the same. This male AMGO reminded me that I see far more male Bald-Headed Cardinals and Patchy Eastern Bluebirds than female ones. Is it just me, or does it seem that way to anyone else? Is there a research grant or doctoral thesis available to a Young Birder?
    4 points
  3. 100% of the one time a friend of mine got bitten by a cormorant, he got an annoying infection. I was partly going by that. I'm glad to know the odds aren't so bad, but the chance of a simple infection would still induce me to use antibiotic cream or something.
    3 points
  4. MN, Not sure if it's a Juv. Red-tailed Hawk or not. The photo's are of the same bird.
    2 points
  5. But it's worse than that. I had three reports in 2018 and one report had a photo! I guess some birds aren't very memorable, at least with a memory like mine. Now if I forget my Avocets...
    2 points
  6. I used to be troubled by belligerent squirrels raiding my six bird feeders. Two are filled with BOSS, one with suet, one with nyjer, and two with nectar for the hummingbirds. I used to hurl an ice cube at them from the upper deck but they ignored that. Now I bang on the guard rail with a steel rod to get their attention and hurl a fistful of ice cubes in their direction. Lately, they flee when they hear the banging. That's good enough for me. It saves the ice for my summer drinks.
    2 points
  7. I've been bit, scratched, clawed, and punctured by many species of birds. Mostly Raptors, but some water birds as well. The worst thing that happened was a simple infection. Usually nothing happens.
    2 points
  8. No albatross would be found on a dock, and any albatross is nearly unheard of anywhere on the east coast. It's important to remember that size is variable in birds, by age, sex, subspecies, individual variation, etc. We often get questions here of "It looked like x bird but was so much bigger", when the photos confirm that it is x species, no question. Size is hard to judge and variable. Not all that useful in many bird identifications to be honest.
    2 points
  9. "Wanna piece of me??!!?? Huh?? Well, come on! I'm ready!!!!" IMG_2312-001 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    2 points
  10. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59663691 Found a first county record American Redstart in my yard!
    2 points
  11. Reposting because the above photo was deleted. @Aveschapines Could you please delete the post above? Thanks!! Praying Mantis by The Bird Nuts, on Flickr
    2 points
  12. Fascinating observation, Charlie. Now that I think of it, I really did observe, but not question, that point. I really don't know much about molts, but it might have to do with many factors. In many species, the males are the only ones with the colorful plumages, and the female is nearly the same year-round. The nonbreeding plumage of males may also very similar to the female year-round plumage. I also observed that adult female plumages are usually similar to juvenile plumages. This brings up some points. I just think that in many cases, it's our perception that brings this observat
    1 point
  13. I'm getting a Caspian impression from that bird. Looks big and bulky. Those are Least Sandpipers.
    1 point
  14. Niiiice!! It's weird to me to think that AMREs are rare.....they are our most common warbler where I live! When in doubt, it's a redstart! 😜
    1 point
  15. 1. I'd call this a Warbling based on the lack of dark lores 2-3. Agree with Pine Warbler 4. Agree with Blackburnian Warbler 5. Cape May Warbler, I think 6-7. Agree with Warbling Vireo
    1 point
  16. I'm a brit, just here on work but trying to find what I can. thanks.
    1 point
  17. That's a very interesting theory. I haven't thought of that before. It would take quite a bit of research to work on species that aren't sexually dimorphic such as Blue Jays.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. Don't you hate that? "Hey, that's a lifer! Oh, wait; eBird shows it as the only bird on an Incidental report from June of 2013. What was I doing at some historical marker in lower Alabama?"
    1 point
  20. All of which just assures you'll come down with the world's first case of avian rabies.
    1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. Hard to decide...... Yellow-billed Magpie IMG_2319-001 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr or Black Phoebe. IMG_2304-001 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    1 point
  23. I would say Chipping Sparrow. EDIT: Reason being, the tail has white outer tail feathers, the bill looks too wide for a warbler, and I think I'm seeing a white supercilium, and the black stripe across the eye.
    1 point
  24. Another for Cooper's Hawk for the reasons Jerry gave plus the sturdy legs.
    1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. Double-crested Cormorant IMG_2227 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr IMG_2228 by Wayne J Smith, on Flickr
    1 point
  27. Yeah? You want some too?
    1 point
  28. Sunrise over the Rio Grande Valley
    1 point
  29. Wow. It is the same rock. I zoomed in and I can see the orange stuff on the end. That's crazy. I knew I recognized the rock from somewhere.
    1 point
  30. Anna's Hummingbird at my feeder this morning.
    1 point
  31. Wow. It could be the same rock 🙂 It was taken on the road to Slough Creek campgrounds (in the Lamar Valley area). Here is the full photo for little more context:
    1 point
  32. Ruby-throated Hummingbird enjoys a zinnia
    1 point
  33. A young Common Yellowthroat. He stayed pretty well hidden in the wildflower garden but came out of hiding long enough to nab a few photos.
    1 point
  34. I came here today for the first time in a long time, but kept getting warnings from FireFox that the site was not secure and the certificate had expired - with the usual "proceed at your own risk"
    1 point
  35. 1 point
  36. Blinded Sphinx (photo taken at nearly midnight -- I love my new ring light!!)
    1 point
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