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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/27/2020 in all areas

  1. Marbled Godwit-5873 by peter spencer, on Flickr Marbled Godwit-
    4 points
  2. White "V" on scapulars is suggesting Red-tailed Hawk to me, but I'm not sure it can be IDed with certainty. Light-morph Rough-legs usually have a much paler head than this, and a pale base to the tail.
    2 points
  3. Field, Song, White-throated.
    2 points
  4. According to eBird, House Finches are a dime a dozen in SW Colorado. Maybe those are being mistaken for Purples. Just a stray thought.
    2 points
  5. The first necessity is ageing these things. The first is a juvenile (yellow eye, streaking below, brown upperparts), the second an adult (orange tone to eye, barring below, blue/darker tones to upperparts). The reddish streaking on the first bird strongly suggests Sharp-shinned, though a minority of juvenile Coops can match that color. The extensive and wide cross-barring on the side feathers also strongly suggest Sharpie. The tail-tip shape on that bird is indeterminable given the angle, but the near lack of white tips to the rectrices also strongly suggest Sharpie, and I have no problem with that ID for this bird. The second bird's blackish crown being contrastingly darker than the nape is one of the few definitive (at least, virtually so) single features differentiating Sharpie and Coop, but, obviously, only in adult plumages. Though that bird does not seem to show the bulk that I associate with female Coops, the eye being only orange (rather than reddish-orange or red) and the strongly graduated tail (see cropped photo: outermost tail feather -- rectrix 6 or r6 -- on the bird's left side is noticeably shorter than the r5, which is also noticeably shorter than the r4; the r3 is shorter than the r4, but only barely) point toward female as the sex of the bird. The eye color, alone, is not at all definitive for age, as male eye color seems to take a while to get to scarlet; this eye color is probably present in some males in their first adult plumage. However, the combo is probably definitive for sex, or as close to such as may exist in the tricky genus that is Accipiter. Recall that, in accipiters, females and juveniles have relatively longer and more-graduated tails than do males and adults, though variation in this feature seems to be fairly high in the individual age-sex classes. Other good features pointing to Coop include the head being noticeably deeper (front to back) than tall and the bill being approximately in line with the curve of the forehead, thus just an extension of that curve (unlike the jutting bill of Sharpie).
    2 points
  6. Yellow-headed Blackbird-5347Last by peter spencer, on Flickr
    2 points
  7. Seen yesterday in the SF Bay area. I'm betting that this is an immature Cooper's Hawk, but I'm happy to be corrected. It seemed to be taking weary refuge in a tree that also supported two crows. If the hawk tried to leave the tree, the crows would harass it. Thanks for your help!
    1 point
  8. Today, Pine Siskin and American Goldfinch.
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. It’s staring into my soul
    1 point
  11. yeah this looks like a COHA
    1 point
  12. Bill looks unusually short, head unusually round for Herring Gull. However I still think it is Herring Gull. Time of year this was taken would be helpful. Obviously Great Black-backed Gull, Ring-billed Gull, and anything smaller than a Ring-bill can be ruled out. This leaves Iceland Gull, Lesser Black-backed Gull, and Herring Gull. Despite being quite short, the bill is fairly stout, thicker than I would expect for "Thayer's" or "Kumlien's" Iceland Gull; primaries are also quite dark, even for Thayer's. Pink base to bill suggests Herring and causes me to lean away from Iceland or Lesser Black-backed, but since I don't know time of year I can't really use that. Patterning on back seems wrong for Lesser Black-backed. So, by deduction, Herring seems like the only one that fits, despite the rather unusual head and bill shape. If it is a Herring, its probably a female because the bill is so short and the head and bill generally seem so gracile.
    1 point
  13. Well, there's your problem, Sam. You'd see lots of Purple Finches if you couldn't tell them from House Finches.
    1 point
  14. It is very difficult to hear what is going on in this, but it sounds kind of like Hermit Thrush call notes to me.
    1 point
  15. I think it's just a ruffled up second or third year bird, looks a little damp as well.
    1 point
  16. Southwest Colorado does NOT have Purple Finches - the species is rare everywhere in the state, but better known from the eastern border than anywhere.
    1 point
  17. Head shape is perfect for Horned, wrong for Eared. Note how large the Eared Grebe's bill is relative to the depth (front to back) of the bird's head. Horned Grebe has a larger head, which then dwarfs the length of the bill.
    1 point
  18. https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/63.pdf
    1 point
  19. 1. Yes, House Finches 2. Looks good for a Bushtit to me 3. Lesser Goldfinch
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. I knew crows would mimic sounds but never saw one in a disguise! Haha I did use to know a lady who had a decades old talking raven though - knew more swear words than a pirate's Polly and barked like a dog to boot.?
    1 point
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