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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/05/2020 in all areas

  1. 2nd Boreal this week...the first was a chickadee. Boreal Owl2 by Fred Durkin, on Flickr
    10 points
  2. Green-crowned Brilliant by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    8 points
  3. These guys can play hide a seek really well!
    8 points
  4. Sorry about that, I posted here thinking I was in Lifers and tried to delete the whole post (so I could then post in Lifers) however the image still appears on my desktop, but not on tablet/phone.
    7 points
  5. Well I don't have photos but I DO have a good story! So where I grew up we had an old pole dairy barn (I mean cedar poles cut when the place was logged cirra 1900) Anyhow we kept a few cows and hence a few dozen tons of hay in that old barn ... a big hay pile seemed an inviting place for young boys to throw down a sleeping bag ... the barn also was a favorite place for a barn owl to sleep. All slept in happy harmony for many a night and we enjoyed the glimpses we got of the shadowy visitor ... until one night while I was fast asleep he came in to roost and LITERALLY gave me an earful !!! ... of fresh white sticky stuff plastered all over the whole side of my face! 😝 Needless to say I was suddenly very much awake and destined for a midnight shower 😂
    4 points
  6. Boreal Chickadee from this weekend. Boreal Chickadee2 by Fred Durkin, on Flickr
    4 points
  7. It was January 30th, my last of 28 days on St George Island, FL. I decided to take my Canon Rebel EOS T6 on my last beach walk. Walking with lens cap on, I saw a Bald Eagle flying away from me. It disappeared behind a cottage before I could get ready. Hoping it would come back, I took off my lens cap, checked the shutter speed - 1200 in shutter speed priority mode - zoomed in at the max - 300X - and got a long focus on the sky. I knew the camera was in burst mode, so I let the it hang from my neck. My girlfriend and I stopped to talk with another couple who had also seen the eagle. We were pointing to where it had been flying and then this pair flew up in front of us. Here are the photos. They are cropped quite a bit, so the resolution is not great. I wish that weren't the case, so I would appreciate any advice in that department. But still, I am proud of the results, and I feel very lucky to have witnessed this with a ready camera. I guess the lesson is to keep your camera near, especially on St George Island. Another lesson might be to hide your lunch from Bald Eagles.
    3 points
  8. Looks better for a fish crow, grackles would have longer tail as you mentioned and would be smaller overall.
    3 points
  9. Sorry about double posting this pic. This is the first of nine pictures in a sequence that shows a Bald Eagle stealing a fish from an Osprey. This is my favorite of the series. See "Bald Eagle steals Osprey's catch of the day" in the "Photo Sharing and Discussion" forum.
    3 points
  10. 3 points
  11. Scarlet Macaw by Mark Goodwin, on Flickr
    3 points
  12. Thanks for the observations @Jerry Friedman! The extent to which I try to teach proper pronunciation varies tremendously depending on the person and the situation. I don't correct anyone at all unless they ask me to, and if I don't even understand what name they're saying I limit myself to repeating it. Those who want further help or correction will ask. But a lot of people I hang out with are professional bird guides or are in training, so they tend to be very interested in learning the correct pronunciations and ask me to help them. I will go as far as teaching them the proper mouth position, etc. to pronounce the sounds if they want! Mayan language speakers generally do better, probably both because they are already bilingual (there is good evidence that learning a third language is easier than a second one) and because the Mayan languages have more vowel sounds than Spanish. But in the most recent case of the Scaup my friend asked me what the correct pronunciation is so he could hear me say it, and I didn't know! Serious birders here use scientific names, and usually also English common names. Guides always use the English common names. The problem with common names in Spanish is they aren't standardized. It's not even an issue of Mexican vs Guatemalan names; they aren't even consistent within Guatemala. "Azulejo" is commonly used for both Eastern Bluebirds and Blue-Gray Tanagers; "Zanate" can be a Great-Tailed Grackle, Bronzed Cowbird, or Melodious Blackbird; and many people call female grackles "Zanates" but males "Clarineros" (and don't realize they are actually the same species). Even in general terms, "gorrión" can mean sparrow to some people and hummingbird to others. And yes, we do pronounce the scientific names as if they were Spanish (how do YOU pronounce "jamaicensis"? I also use the "J" from "José") and many birders prefer them because they are easier to pronounce (even if badly LOL!) than English names. Newbie birders and non-birders always ask for Spanish names, so we spend a lot of time explaining the issues with Spanish names. But it can be a source of lots of fun! During the Christmas Bird Count in Panajachel in January one of my teammates (the one who asked me how to pronounce "Scaup") kept saying Dusky-Capped Flycatcher more like "Dus -- kycapped Flycatcher", pausing after the "dus" and linking the "-ky" with the "capped". I kept hearing it as "dos Kikab' Flycatchers", Kikab' being the Mayan name of the son of a mutual friend! It took me a few seconds to process that it was (one) Dusky-Capped, and not two Kikab' Flycatchers! We both had a good laugh and my friend started very carefully saying "Dus---ky (long pause) CAP" Flycatcher!
    2 points
  13. Lifer (obviously) Ivory Gull. INCREDIBLE to see! Full story here: https://idahobirder.weebly.com/blog/ivory-gull-adventure
    2 points
  14. Just returned from a week long trip to the NE US. We spent most of our time in MA. Here is a species list. Lifers in all-caps. May add photos later. Brant BARNACLE GOOSE- Two birds continuing in Bristol Co. Mass Canada Goose Snow Goose Mute Swan Gadwall Eurasian Wigeon- a drake on Long Island American Wigeon Mallard American Black Duck Northern Pintail Green-winged Teal Canvasback Redhead Ring-necked Duck TUFTED DUCK- a male in Rhode Island Greater Scaup Lesser Scaup Common Eider Harlequin Duck- many Surf Scoter White-winged Scoter Black Scoter Long-tailed Duck Bufflehead Common Goldeneye Barrow’s Goldeneye- a pair at Great Herring Pond MA and a lone hen at Macmillan Wharf Hooded Merganser Common Merganser Red-breasted Merganser Ruddy Duck Pied-billed Grebe Horned Grebe Rock Pigeon Mourning Dove American Coot Killdeer Sanderling Dunlin DOVEKIE- two days in a row at Macmillan Wharf and several fly-blys farther up the coast THICK-BILLED MURRE- 4 at Macmillan Wharf, 2 at Jodrey Pier Razorbill Black Guillemot- including MA’s first Mandt’s subspecies Ring-billed Gull Herring Gull Iceland Gull- several at Race Point. A couple more randomly found up the coast Lesser Black-backed Gull Great Black-backed Gull Red-throated Loon Common Loon Great Cormorant Great Blue Heron Black Vulture Turkey Vulture Bald Eagle Northern Harrier Cooper’s Hawk Red-shouldered Hawk Red-tailed Hawk Rough-legged Hawk- a couple on Plum Island Eastern Screech-Owl Snowy Owl- Plum Island Short-eared Owl- Cumberland Farms and Plum Island Belted Kingfisher Red-bellied Woodpecker Northern Flicker Pileated Woodpecker NORTHERN SHRIKE- Plum Island Blue Jay American Crow Fish Crow Horned Lark Tree Swallow Black-capped Chickadee Tufted Titmouse White-breasted Nuthatch Carolina Wren Golden-crowned Kinglet Eastern Bluebird American Robin Northern Mockingbird European Starling House Sparrow House Finch American Goldfinch AMERICAN TREE SPARROW- according to eBird, the #1 bird I needed in the US, many at different locations Savannah Sparrow Song Sparrow White-throated Sparrow Dark-eyed Junco Red-winged Blackbird Yellow-rumped Warbler Northern Cardinal
    1 point
  15. --Brown Pelican Anahauc NWR 7-18 by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  16. Congrats!! What number is it for you?
    1 point
  17. Yes, unfortunately. Goldens would never have that much white close to the body and have smaller beaks/heads and longer tails.
    1 point
  18. This is certainly a bird that was produced much farther north, as the local adults and juveniles are typically noticeably paler-headed and -bellied.
    1 point
  19. Juvenile (not immature) Cooper's https://cobirds.org/CFO/ColoradoBirds/InTheScope/87.pdf
    1 point
  20. 1. Male Mallard x American Black Duck with what appears to be a pure American Black Duck (front right). 2. Northern Gannet 3. Pass
    1 point
  21. My trick for that (when people ask me for help) is to tell them to pronounce a long "sssssssss" sound and then go into the rest of the word; that prevents the automatic "e" at the beginning. With practice they can learn it (just like we can learn to use very short vowels and roll "r" and "rr" correctly!)
    1 point
  22. I've heard "scowp", as if it were German, but that's wrong. There's nothing German about the word. Go with the "hawk" vowel. If you're trying to teach Spanish speakers to say it, I agree with @akandula that "scap" and "scop" are the closest. But if you're teaching them English, maybe you should try to teach them English sounds that don't occur in Spanish? What are you doing about "hawk"? (Anyway, the biggest problem may be getting them not to say "escap".) The official Mexican name seems to be "pato boludo", though the Spanish Wikipedia says "porrón bastardo", which I think is rude, and "porrón bola". I don't know whether Guatemalans would want to use Mexican names. The one Mexican trained as a naturalist who I've met used scientific names, which he pronounced in Spanish, e.g., Buteo jamaicensis with the "j" as in "José".
    1 point
  23. Definitely young Cooper's. Note the thin streaking, tubular overall, relatively large, blocky head, small eyes close to the front of the head, and shorter outer-tail feathers. "Squareness" and "roundness" of the tail are misleading; instead look at the relative length of the outer tail feathers. On Cooper's, they're noticeably smaller than the inner feathers, while on Sharp-shinned, all the feathers are about the same length.
    1 point
  24. Lola is fast. Lola is smart. Lola cheats. Lola launches forward when I am in the middle of my back swing! My wife thinks she can train Lola for agility competition. I think Lola is better suited for drag races than for autocross meets. Lola might do well in a tractor pull competition. Lola is exceptionally large for a female of the Bouver des Flandres breed. Bouviers were bred to pull milk carts and herd oxen to market and serve as a general purpose farm dog who could protect people and property and livestock from intruders.
    1 point
  25. This is actually an immature White-crowned Sparrow. Chipping Sparrows have black lores, pinker bills, and usually a flatter head shape.
    1 point
  26. Northern Mockingbird, 16 Dec 20, Batesburg-Leesville Industrial Park, SC
    1 point
  27. Gods, this bird could be dead by now.
    1 point
  28. Bearded Warbler by johnd1964, on Flickr
    1 point
  29. Lesser Yellowlegs-5851 by peter spencer, on Flickr
    1 point
  30. My yearlist went up three species today! Northern Pintail, Common Goldeneye and Hooded Merganser.
    1 point
  31. Neat idea Mel! Here's one... was out for a couple of hours today and it was getting late/losing light. I took a shortcut through the woods going back to my truck (had given up on any more birds photos) and ran into this group: Young buck The Doe and the big guy stepped into light It was (any day is) a good day to be out!
    1 point
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